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Comment: Another cure that is worse than the disease (Score 5, Interesting) 170

by melonman (#45538537) Attached to: Spamhaus Calls for Fining Operators of Insecure Servers

This sounds great in theory but, in practice, it's going to be almost impossible to enforce (eg whose definition of 'vulnerable'?) and it would promptly create several new Internet plagues, eg the "Your server has a vulnerability, pay us now to stop us reporting it" spam email.

Comment: Re:That's overly simplistic - population density k (Score 3, Insightful) 569

by melonman (#45263121) Attached to: Why Is Broadband More Expensive In the US Than Elsewhere?

The picture you paint of Europe is a little simplistic too. France has a few large cities, but the tenth-biggest one has less than half a million inhabitants. It has tens of thousands of villages with 1000 or less inhabitants. And you get a choice of cheap ADSL provider in most of those small villages.

Comment: Re:Obvious but baffling that it's not done yet (Score 1) 1532

by LordYUK (#45000739) Attached to: U.S. Government: Sorry, We're Closed

Well, looking at the US deficit and debt, one could argue that the Tea Party might be loonies but at least it isn't their policy to spend their grandchildren's earnings.

It wasn't Bill Clinton's policy to spend his grandchildren's earnings either. He left office with the budget in balance.

It was George W. Bush's policy to spend that surplus on tax breaks for his billionaire friends, and then spend $3 trillion for a war in Iraq for the purpose of (what was it again?), most of which went to his no-bid contractors like Halliburton. Bush left us in debt that your grandchildren will be paying for.

The Tea Party is funded by the same loonies that got those no-bid contracts.

yeah man no bid contracts never go to Haliburton under Obama! He farts rainbows and rides a unicorn to work every day!

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2010/may/13/obamas-mounting-hypocrisy/

Comment: Not if, when (Score 1) 466

by melonman (#44875503) Attached to: Can GM Challenge Tesla With a Long-Range Electric Car?

The answer to "Could someone else make this thing I just made" is always "yes", eventually. We have patents to slow the arrival of the "yes" answer enough so that the first person to do so gets to make a bit of money.

But in this case (and most other cases) there's more than one way to do it and a lot of relevant technology, a lot of which is general car technology. And in every case, sooner or later, the huge company with a huge patent portfolio and huge expertise in manufacturing is going to win the "lowest price point" game... if they want to.

At the moment, the big players don't think there's a big enough market to make it worth their while to compete aggressively. At some point that will change, and at that point GM and other huge companies will develop, licence or acquire whatever technology they need. At the moment, Tesla is selling a niche product. That's great, but it hardly the same as producing electric cars for everyone.

Or, to put it the other way round, does anyone see Tesla scaling production up to anything like GM's level while GM quietly hands them market share and eventually gets out of the car business?

Comment: Re:Stack Overflow (Score 1) 211

by melonman (#44754337) Attached to: Writing Documentation: Teach, Don't Tell

My experience is that I have to read 10 Stack Overflow responses to find one that gives me a clue to the right answer... and that this is still usually a faster way to find a solution than trying to work it all out myself. It's usually one of the "No, that's wrong because..." post that turns the lights on for me.

Comment: Re:Superlatives are superlative! (Score 1) 104

by melonman (#44592933) Attached to: Ubuntu Edge Now Most-Backed Crowdfunding Campaign Ever

I can't see how this tells them anything useful about price points for retail sale. The people who pledged money are agreeing to buy an untested phone in a year's time. That's way beyond even "normal" "early adopters". To do that, you have to be really passionate about new technology AND be able to pay a premium price for a phone you can't use for 12 months.

I've spoken to several people who, like me, might well have paid if the phone would be shipped today or in a couple of months. But with the timescales in the proposal the "price points" are for venture capitalists plus people with money to spare who just want a slice of a neat idea.

None of this tells us anything about how much they could sell production phones with this spec for in a year's time, and it's pretty much certain that to achieve any kind of market share they'd have so drop prices compared with the ones they tried this month.

Comment: Thinly disguised non-story (Score 1) 220

by melonman (#44586153) Attached to: Excess Coffee May Be Linked To Early Death

They make this claim in the first paragraph and then spend the next four pages pointing out that they didn't check lifestyle, didn't distinguish caffeinated and decaff and that half a dozen other studies have shown health benefits of drinking coffee, and conclude by saying that health experts are not putting coffee on any lists for lack of hard evidence.

Comment: Slow death despite nostalgia? (Score 5, Insightful) 312

by melonman (#44342595) Attached to: Poll Shows That 75% Prefer Printed Books To eBooks

I'd be interested to see the answers broken down by age. It may well be that most of the people who love paper books will be dead in 20 years.

I suspect there's also a "fake good" effect, in that people feel they ought to be supporting their local bookshop and therefore say that they do, even if, in fact, they buy a book a year in an airport and every other book on Amazon.

Personally, I really like paper, even for technical books, but all my colleagues look at me like I'm wearing sabre-toothed tiger skins and wielding a club.

Comment: Definition of "reminder" (Score 1) 200

by melonman (#44038847) Attached to: Trying To Learn a Foreign Language? Avoid Reminders of Home

If we take this to its logical conclusion, ex-pats should lose the ability to speak the local language whenever they look at their spouse. And Chinese staff in a Chinese restaurant outside of China wouldn't have a hope. This has not been my experience. I suspect that the experiment is not demonstrating what the experimenters think it is demonstrating.

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