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Submission + - Appeals Court Tosses Out $11M Spamhaus Judgement (

Panaqqa writes: "In a not unexpected move, the U.S. 7th Circuit Court of Appeals threw out the $11 million awarded to e360 Insight, and vacated a permanent injunction against Spamhaus requiring them to stop listing e360 Insight as a spammer. The ruling [PDF] does not, however, set aside the default judgement, meaning that Spamhaus has still lost its opportunity to argue the case. Unfortunate, considering a recent CDA 230(c)(2) ruling concerning spyware."

Submission + - Don't Believe the Hype

An anonymous reader writes: Julian Murdoch at the always-excellent Gamers with Jobs says you shouldn't buy Halo 3. At least, not until a little time has passed. The reason? Hype never wins. From the article:

It's just marketing. It's not even particularly brilliant marketing. It's hype for hype's sake. But the irony is that the slogan, "BELIEVE," is the problem with all marketing towards the hardcore gamer. We (and I mean me) read everything. We watch everything. We drool over the plate-scraps of developers. We BELIEVE in capital letters. We want to believe. Our belief that what is coming tomorrow is better than today is unshakable. Boy are we stupid.
Read the whole thing.
The Courts

Judge Says, Record DNA of Everyone In the UK 403

Many readers informed us about the opinion of Lord Justice Sedley, a senior UK Appeal Court judge, who said that everyone in the UK should have their DNA recorded in the national database — including visitors. Reader ChiefGeneralManager writes, "Sedley calls the current database 'indefensible' because it contains a hodge-podge mix of people, including children and those who have been in contact with the police. His view is that we should make it compulsory for all DNA to be recorded to remove this anomaly. The UK Information Commissioner has expressed some concerns, but not dismissed the idea outright." And reader john.wingfield adds, "Just under two weeks ago, the Independent reported that the Government has admitted that an eighth of all records on the DNA database are false, misspelled, or incorrect — over half a million records. This raises the possibility of a breach of the 4th data protection principle of the Data Protection Act 1998: 'Personal data shall be accurate and, where necessary, kept up to date.'"

Submission + - Microsoft forces shutdown of Autopatcher

kaufmanmoore writes: Posts on Neowin and Autopatcher's site announce Microsoft has forced the closure of the Autopatcher download section. Details are scarce as to the exact reason for the take down after over 4 years of availability, but an official from Microsoft legal says that it has nothing to do with Windows Genuine Advantage. Goodbye to another useful tool that helped sysadmins apply Microsoft's numerous patches.

Submission + - Microsoft releases Windows Vista SP1 details (

katurday writes: "According to Microsoft Watch, "Microsoft plans to release the first Vista service pack beta to 10,000 to 15,000 select testers in just a few weeks. Microsoft also plans to release Windows XP Service Pack 3 beta to testers about the same time." They also point out that Beta testing may be limited to MSDN and TechNet, and that a release version may not be available until the first quarter of 2008. Microsoft has previously hinted that a Vista service pack would launched in unison with the Windows Server 2008 product."

Submission + - Microsoft patents HUD for cars ( 1

Amigan writes: "Ars Technica is reporting:
United States Patent Application 20070194902 from Microsoft is titled an "adaptive heads-up user interface for automobiles." The patent app says that the heads-up display (HUD) could be used for a variety of tasks, or "elements," like displaying navigational information, information about a driver's health, speed of the car, and media such as iPods or CDs."


Submission + - Poverty Down, Uninsured Up: What's the Link? (

IConrad01 writes: "Functionalism In Action: A Screed Towards Explaining the Link Between Poverty Decrease And "Un-Insured" Increase is a commentary by a technophile libertarian (yours truly) that attempts to make the case for a very simple reform — already suggested — that could simultaneously decrease poverty & increase health-insurance coverage by millions of people, in both categories.

To summarize: replace corporate tax breaks with individualized tax credits — and reduce the regulatory burden on small (read: 1-50 employees) businesses so that they don't have to pay between 4-10x as much per employee."

Feed The Register: Zango abandons PC Tools adware lawsuit (

Adware classification rumpus

Controversial adware outfit Zango has withdrawn legal proceedings against anti-spyware firm PC Tools. The decision follows its failure to persuade a court to issue a temporary restraining order that would have prevented PC Tools from classifying Zango's software as potentially malicious. Both firms hail the outcome of the case as a victory.

Feed Techdirt: Researchers Want To Test How The Plague Would Spread In World Of Warcraft (

There are all sorts of questions about how the government would respond in the event of a serious outbreak of a dangerous virus or a plague. Certainly, various gov't agencies have plans and procedures in place, but it's difficult to account for all the different possibilities and how something might spread. However, some researchers have an idea for how they might get a better idea and perhaps get some training in at the same time: use online video games like "World of Warcraft" and see what happens when some players are infected with a contagious plague. The researchers note that "World of Warcraft" had its own plague a few years ago, which gave them the original idea to approach Blizzard to work out some sort of deal to do this kind of research. They hope that by seeing how real people react, with virtual characters whom they've invested a lot of time in, they'll get a better idea of how people react to certain situations such as quarantines. Whether or not it actually will work, it certainly seems like a creative solution to get a better understanding of some potential scenarios, prior to an actual emergency situation.
The Internet

Submission + - Attack, User Data Stolen (

Placid writes: "The BBC has an article detailing a successful attack on the US recruitment site, According to the article, "A computer program was used to access the employers' section of the website using stolen log-in credentials" and that the stolen details were "uploaded to a remote web server". Apparently, this remote server "held over 1.6 million entries with personal information belonging to several hundred thousands of candidates, mainly based in the US, who had posted their resumes to the website". The article also links the break-in to a phishing e-mail sent out recently where personal details were used to entice users to download a "Monster Job Seeker Tool".

What does this mean for spam? Will we now be inundated with job requests for pharmaceutical companies and African investment opportunities?...Oh, wait..."

16.5 feet in the Twilight Zone = 1 Rod Serling