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The Almighty Buck

Starbucks Partners With Square 145

Posted by Soulskill
from the physical-wallet-death-clock-just-ticked dept.
Square, the start-up mobile payment service that aims to bring credit card transactions to anyone with a smartphone, has formed a partnership with Starbucks, a move that vastly increases Square's reach and visibility. According to the NY Times, "This fall, Square will begin processing all credit and debit card transactions at Starbucks stores in the United States and eventually customers will be able to order a grande vanilla latte and charge it to their credit cards simply by saying their names. Though smartphone payments have a long way to go before they replace wallets altogether, Starbucks’s adoption of Square will catapult the start-up’s technology onto street corners nationwide, and is the clearest sign yet that mobile payments could become mainstream. ... At first, Starbucks customers will need to show the merchant a bar code on their phones. But when Starbucks uses Square’s full GPS technology, the customer’s phone will automatically notify the store that the customer has entered, and the customer’s name and photo will pop up on the cashier’s screen. The customer will give the merchant his or her name, Starbucks will match the photo and the payment will be complete."
Communications

Ask Slashdot: Resources For Identifying Telecom Right-of-Way Locations? 107

Posted by samzenpus
from the coming-through dept.
An anonymous reader writes "With threats to network neutrality, such as Verizon's recent lawsuit, I've been thinking of creating a map plotting all the locations where telecommunications companies currently use public lands via right-of-way laws. It seems that this would convey just how much telecommunications depends on public infrastructure. However, it's been difficult identifying where these locations are. Short of crowdsourcing, does anyone know of resources that could be used to create such a map?"
Education

Does Grammar Matter Anymore? 878

Posted by samzenpus
from the pretty-talk dept.
theodp writes "A lighthearted 4th of July post pointing out how Microsoft Word could help Google CEO Larry Page catch typos in his Google+ posts turned out to be fighting words for GeekWire readers. "Grammar is an important indicator of the quality of one's message," insisted one commenter. "You shouldn't have disgraced yourself by stooping to trolling your readers with an article about what essentially amounts to using a full blown word processor for a tweet. Albeit an rather long example of one," countered another. A few weeks earlier, the WSJ sparked a debate with its report that grammar gaffes have invaded the office in an age of informal e-mail, texting and Twitter. So, does grammar matter anymore?"
Hardware Hacking

Ask Slashdot: a Good Geek Project For My Arthritic Grandfather? 122

Posted by timothy
from the spy-on-the-neighbors'-lawn dept.
An anonymous reader writes "My grandfather is a retired electrician whom I've been trying to keep mentally busy. Together we've gotten an Arduino kit and have been working on some simple projects. He does the wiring and I've been writing the code. Recently his arthritis has been getting worse and he's been unable to work with the tiny components that the Arduino projects require. Does anyone have a recommendation for something similar we could work on together that would be easier for someone with his compromised manual dexterity?"
Microsoft

Microsoft To Shut Down App Store For Windows Mobile 154

Posted by Soulskill
from the if-an-app-store-falls-in-the-forest dept.
angry tapir writes "Microsoft will soon shut down the app store for Windows Mobile, the phone platform it is phasing out. Starting May 9, users of Windows Mobile phones won't be able to browse, buy or download apps to their phones from the Marketplace, Microsoft wrote in a letter to customers. The move doesn't affect users of Microsoft's new mobile OS, who will continue to be served by the Windows Phone Marketplace."
Input Devices

MIT's New Camera Can Take 1 Trillion Frames Per Second 197

Posted by timothy
from the need-a-really-big-sd-card dept.
First time accepted submitter probain writes "MIT has made a camera that can take trillion frames per second! With this high speed capability, they can actually see the movement of photons of light across a scene or object. This is just mind-boggling." ExtremeTech has a nice video of the system, too. What would you like to see slowed down to such a degree?
Privacy

Big Brother In the Home Office 298

Posted by timothy
from the where-the-raspberry-pi-comes-in dept.
hessian writes with this excerpt from the New York Times' "Bits" column: "Tens of thousands of programmers, writers, accountants and other workers labor at home doing contract work for companies like Google, Hewlett-Packard and NBC. The computers they use contain software that takes snapshots of what they are doing six times an hour. The snooping occurs randomly, making it impossible for the computer user to game the system. It is probably more invasive than what happens to those working in offices, where scooting through Facebook entries, shopping on Cyber Monday, and peeping at N.S.F.W. ('Not Safe for Work') Web sites on corporate computers is both normal and rarely observed by managers."
Japan

Russian Scientists Say They'll Clone a Mammoth Within 5 Years 302

Posted by samzenpus
from the pleistocene-park dept.
Many scientists (mainly Japanese and Russian) have dreamed of cloning a mammoth over the years. When the mammoth genome was partially reconstructed in 2008, that dream seemed a bit closer. Besides the millions of dollars needed for such a project, the biggest hurdle was the lack of a good sample of mammoth DNA. That hurdle has now been cleared, thanks to the discovery of well-preserved bone marrow in a mammoth thigh bone. Russian scientist Semyon Grigoriev, acting director of the Sakha Republic's mammoth museum, and colleagues from Japan's Kinki University say that within 5 years they'll likely have a clone. From the article: "What's been missing is woolly mammoth nuclei with undamaged genes. Scientists have been on a Holy Grail-type search for such pristine nuclei since the late 1990s. Now it sounds like the missing genes may have been found."
Earth

Physical Models In an Age of Computers 78

Posted by timothy
from the bah-all-models-should-be-life-sized dept.
Harperdog points out this article "about the Bay Model in Sausalito, California, which was built in 1959 to study a (terrible) plan to dam up San Francisco Bay. The model was at the forefront of research and testing on water issues that affected all of California; its research contributions have been rendered obsolete by computer testing, but there are many who think it could contribute still. Now used for education and tourism, the model is over 1 1/2 acres and replicates a 24-hour tidal cycle in just 14 minutes. Good stuff."

Comment: Re:collateral (Score 2) 494

by Lookin4Trouble (#36217296) Attached to: Corporate Mac Sales Surge 66%

As someone who doesn't work in a datacenter, is the rackmount absolutely necessary? Apple offers the Mac Pro in a server configuration.

Yes. Rack-mounting 2U Servers in a 42U cabinet means I can fit 16 comfortably with room to breathe, plus have my cable management solution, and room for a Power Distribution device.
Trying to shoehorn server towers into the same rack means I can fit 6 servers, with each pair sitting on a heavy-duty shelf. My cable management is screwed because I'm putting power, data, and control all bundled together up both sides of the rack, and if I need to perform hardware replacement/addition/maintenance, the server has to be removed, surgery done, and then hauled back into place.

Let's not forget the whole density thing - if I can fit 6 quad-CPU xServes in one cabinet, or 16 quad-CPU PowerEdge Servers, which one gives me the best bang for my (ridiculously expensive) pay-by-the-square-foot-per-month footprint dollar?

Technology

Fermi Lab May Have Discovered New Particle or Force 226

Posted by samzenpus
from the probably-a-build-up-of-midichlorians dept.
schleprock63 writes "Physicists at Fermi Lab have found a 'suspicious bump' in their data that could indicate they've found a new elementary particle or even a new force of nature. The discovery could 'be the most significant discovery in physics in half a century.' Physicists have ruled out that the particle could be the standard model Higgs boson, but theorize that it could be some new and unexpected version of the Higgs. This discovery comes as the Tevatron is slated to go offline sometime in September."

It's a poor workman who blames his tools.

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