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+ - Keep smiling, waste spammers' time with OpenBSD tools->

Submitted by badger.foo
badger.foo (447981) writes "When you're in the business of building the networks people need and the services they need to run on them, you may also be running a mail service. If you do, you will sooner or later need to deal with spam. This article is about how to waste spammers' time and have a good time while doing it, using the free tools OpenBSD offers to do your greylisting and greytrapping before any content filtering. It's fun and easy."
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Mars

4-Billion-Pixel Panorama View From Curiosity Rover 101

Posted by samzenpus
from the take-a-look dept.
SternisheFan points out that there is a great new panorama made from shots from the Curiosity Rover. "Sweep your gaze around Gale Crater on Mars, where NASA's Curiosity rover is currently exploring, with this 4-billion-pixel panorama stitched together from 295 images. ...The entire image stretches 90,000 by 45,000 pixels and uses pictures taken by the rover's two MastCams. The best way to enjoy it is to go into fullscreen mode and slowly soak up the scenery — from the distant high edges of the crater to the enormous and looming Mount Sharp, the rover's eventual destination."

Comment: Stroustrup chose proportional-width (Score 4, Interesting) 394

by Looke (#30797874) Attached to: Programming With Proportional Fonts?

All code in Stroustrup's "The C++ Programming Language" is presented in a proportional-width font: "At first glance, this presentation style will seem 'unnatural' to programmers accustomed to seeing code in constant-width fonts. However, proportional-width fonts are generally regarded as better than constant-width fonts for presentation of text. Using a proportional-width font also allows me to present code with fewer illogical line breaks. Furthermore, my experiments show that most people find the new style more readable after a short while."

Not only is the font proportional, but it's bold, italic, and serif as well. Now, reading a textbook is of course pretty different from editing on-screen, but I remember reconsidering some of my habits after reading that book. That code ain't hard to read.

Comment: Re:Cheap Printer? (Score 1) 970

by Looke (#30318082) Attached to: What Do You Do When Printers Cost Less Than Ink?
My dirt-cheap Brother DCP-130C came with full cartridges. I guess that's because the fixed costs of producing two lines of ink for the same printers are too high. HP, Epson and Canon sell a lot more printers and ink.

The downside to this printer is that it refuses to print anything, even plain b/w, once one colour cartridge is empty. I fooled it with a piece of black tape.

Comment: Re:it's all about screen size (Score 1) 220

by Looke (#29768565) Attached to: The Sad State of the Mobile Web
"Scrolling the text sideways"? It doesn't sound like you ever tried a decent mobile browser, like Opera Mini. It reflows text and resizes images to fit your little 3 inch window. For a whole lot of sites out there, neat and simple tricks like that work brilliantly.

As for the rise of web apps that the article brings up, that's where a mobile browser like Opera Mini falls short.

Comment: Re:..and if you are color blind? (Score 1) 132

by Looke (#27985335) Attached to: IBM Patents Changing Color of E-Mail Text
It could be be an advantage for the colour blind, too. If text is tagged "important" instead of "red" or "bold", then it can render blue for koreans and bold for colour blinds. This means you cannot blame it on software anymore; you should have clicked the "important" button, not what you thought was "red".
Media

AACS Hack Blamed on Bad Player Implementation 272

Posted by Zonk
from the finger-pointing-but-no-porn dept.
seriouslywtf writes "The AACS LA, those responsible for the AACS protection used by HD DVD and Blu-ray, has issued a statement claiming that AACS has not been compromised. Instead, they blame the implementation of AACS on specific players and claim that the makers of those players should follow the Compliance and Robustness Rules. 'It's not us, it's them!' This, however, does not appear to be the entire truth. From the Ars Technica article: 'This is an curious accusation because, according to the AACS documentation reviewed by Ars Technica, the AACS specification does not, in fact, account for this attack vector. ... We believe the AACS LA may be able to stop this particular hack. While little is truly known about how effective the key revocation system in AACS is, in theory it should be possible for the AACS LA to identify the players responsible for the breach and prevent later pressings of discs from playing back on those players until they are updated. As such, if the hole can be patched in the players, the leak of volume keys could be limited to essentially what is already on the market. That is, until another hole is found.'"

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