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Comment: Re:First thought... (Score 1) 287

by LitelySalted (#30783888) Attached to: "Doomsday Clock" Moves Away From Midnight

I would say that is very hopeful thinking. The biggest threat does not actually come from the explosion itself (okay, yes, the explosion is also bad), but from the nuclear fallout that occurs after.

Nuclear fallout can affect HUGE areas of the world. When a nuclear device is detonated, radioactive particles get launched into the atmosphere that can travel across the globe.

Nuclear Fallout

I also see comments below about the bombs dropped on Japan - people need to keep in mind that was 65 years ago AND the bomb types were nuclear FISSION, not nuclear fusion. There's a distinct difference. I'm not exactly sure what types of bombs Pakistan and India have, but it's probably bad either way.

Comment: Re:This has been an issue for quite awhile. (Score 2, Insightful) 420

People tend to forget that NEED is the real motivation behind technological advances and implementation. Japan, for example, has a high need to handle transit, housing, and recreation within their limited space and with a high population density. Therefore, Japan's need has compelled them to implement technology to handle these limitations. Such examples can be seen in their train infrastructure or space efficient housing.

On the other hand, the United States’ need for the same technology is not as high. Generally speaking, our space constraints are not as limiting and we don't have such a high population density that mass public transit has becomes a necessity rather than a convenience, thus we have large automobiles and expansive houses. The same examples can be drawn for most of the developed world. The transit system in Europe is more developed because the price of gasoline as a commodity is higher - they have a need for a cheaper alternative.

To think that one country is leaps and bounds ahead of others is naive. There are no countries full of Cowboy Astronaut Millionaires. With how globally tied together our countries have become, technological advances tend to propagate worldwide in a year or two, taking into account social and political considerations - the only exception to the trend is military technology.

Comment: This sounds like Tiger Bot Hesh (Score 1) 428

by LitelySalted (#30145432) Attached to: IBM Takes a (Feline) Step Toward Thinking Machines

(From Sealab 2021)

Sparks: Um, ok, but remember, you'll have the strength of five gorillas.
Debbie DuPree: Why settle for a cat Hesh? You could be a robot... tiger.
Marco: No, no, no! Absolamente no! If I have to be five foot nothing Hesh can't be a tiger!
Captain Murphy: Your not the boss of tiger bot Hesh!

+ - Robot Fish might soon help ocean researches->

Submitted by redfire111
redfire111 (1650697) writes "Michigan State University is currently working on a program that would create robotic fish to monitor water conditions. The robots will use fish-like mechanisms to stay afloat and enable scientists to constantly monitor an area. Right now there is just one prototype and it isn't yet able to withstand strong currents so it must be confined to stiller waters."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Yep, this is going to do nothing. (Score 3, Insightful) 455

by LitelySalted (#29838653) Attached to: Court Orders the Pirate Bay To Delete Torrents

The only way to control this is by requiring users to have login names and controlling who can post what (perhaps instituting a probationary period of say 3-7 days so that they don't get spammed with new users).

Otherwise, this is just going to be a repeat of YouTube and other file sharing networks, copyright material still gets uploaded, even if it eventually gets deleted.

This is exactly why the Pirate Bay claims not to have any responsibility for the content on the site - they do not micromanage any of the who or what, they simply provide the service of hosting.

"Your stupidity, Allen, is simply not up to par." -- Dave Mack (mack@inco.UUCP) "Yours is." -- Allen Gwinn (allen@sulaco.sigma.com), in alt.flame

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