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Comment: Re:Linus wants the Desktop? (Score 2) 663

by Lisias (#47718029) Attached to: Linus Torvalds: 'I Still Want the Desktop'

You guys no nothing about Linus or how he likes to use his desktop. It's funny how people export their dreams and ideas to one man like this.

I follow the guy on G+. I did read what he said about Gnome 3 at that time in first hand.

But you can read about it here.

The guy is not remotely qualified to write a desktop. Have you seen all the commands in git? The first round was a usability nightmare. Hell he himself would admit that.

Linus wrote Linux 0.99, a really little piece of crap compared to any usable UNIX kernel at that time. But yet, he managed to lead this project in a way that now Linux is probably the most used kernel (UNIX like or not) in the world. And the thing is really good (but granted, perhaps not the best).

Linus wrote git, a really piece of crap compared to any usable DCMS at that time. But yet, he managed to lead this project in a way that now git is probably the most used CMS (distributed or not) in the world. And the thing is really good (but granted, perhaps not the best).

Did this makes a ring sounds somewhere in your head? Or you need me to draw it to you? :-)

The guy is a great engineer. Great engineers don't invent great things, they build great things - most of the time, using shitty things as experiments/prototypes/proofs of concepts in order to get the great thing done.

Comment: Re:Why focus on the desktop? (Score 2) 663

by Lisias (#47716965) Attached to: Linus Torvalds: 'I Still Want the Desktop'

[...]Moving from Snow Leopard to Lion was my greatest mistake. Up to that point I had been a satisfied, kool-aid drinking, cash-spending Appletard.

I totally agree. I miss Snow Leopard very much. Lion was a piece of shit.

I'm currently using Mavericks, and I finally started to like Mac OS again - but I still miss Snow Leopard. Apple managed to dumb down the Mac OS X to a level that, frankly, offends me : why I can't use Expose? I was happy with it.

Comment: Linus wants the Desktop? (Score 3, Insightful) 663

by Lisias (#47716903) Attached to: Linus Torvalds: 'I Still Want the Desktop'

So I recommend him to start his own Desktop project. :-)

Seriously, I don't know of, now, any other Open Source leader capable of doing a decent Desktop. Torvalds finishes what he starts, and he finishes it vrey well (see git).

We had very good Desktops in the past, but nowadays things are just too shiny and too new and... too dumbed down to be useful to me: who knows me from other /. posts about this matter knows why I migrated to MacOS two years ago, and don't plan to migrate back in the short run.

I still love Linux - all my non desktop machines are Linux, no questions asked. But I just can't handle any of the present mainstream Desktops to use Linux again on my working box.

Comment: Re:All that money... (Score 1) 570

by Lisias (#47709671) Attached to: Munich Reverses Course, May Ditch Linux For Microsoft

From the DOCX specs:

Microsoft has patents that may cover your implementations of the technologies described in the Open Specifications. Neither this notice nor Microsoft's delivery of the documentation grants any licenses under those or any other Microsoft patents. However, a given Open Specification may be covered by Microsoft Open Specification Promise or the Community Promise. If you would prefer a written license, or if the technologies described in the Open Specifications are not covered by the Open Specifications Promise or Community Promise, as applicable, patent licenses are available by contacting iplg@microsoft.com.

Comment: Re:All that money... (Score 1) 570

by Lisias (#47709627) Attached to: Munich Reverses Course, May Ditch Linux For Microsoft

Yep. And then all that money that would be used to pay salaries that would be used on expenses locally, making the local economy work, will be redirected to Bill Gate's pockets.

Who in turn gave the vast bulk of his money to end disease, educate children, feed the world, etc.

Some people can live with the charity of the riches. Some other prefer to work hard to earn money, pay the taxes and then demanding proper health care and education.

I prefer to live with the second way of life.

I can live with that.

Considering Germany is a net exporter: I'm not sure "keeping the money local" is actually a need.

Perhaps not, I don't know. But would be wiser to avoid putting all their eggs on the USA's basket again.

When in a few years, when all our documents will be locked in a proprietary cloud (that anyone with the right influence will have access) or stored locally in a format that you must pay to read, remember 2004.

MS uses XML to save documents. Put them wherever you like.

Yeah. Right. You was embraced and extended. :-)

Use of cloud storage is hardly unique to MS. Want me to start citing Linux distros doing it?

Yes.

A glitch on gtalk rendered me with my cellphone out of the cell network for weeks until the support from an app (that I was thinking was the culprid) help me to locate the problem.

A friend lose this documents because his account was terminated by mistake (other company, not related to the previous case).

There's privacy concerns everywhere.

So, yes. Cloud, no matter from whom, is going to be a nighmare.

Comment: Re:All that money... (Score 1) 570

by Lisias (#47709525) Attached to: Munich Reverses Course, May Ditch Linux For Microsoft

And then all that money that would be used to pay salaries that would be used on expenses locally, making the local economy work, will be redirected to Bill Gate's pockets.

The chief idea behind this was to save money yet it resulted in a poor user experience with many complaints. Saving money by paying salaries to people to produce a product that results in many user complaints is not a good economic choice.

Agreed. But exporting jobs to an already incredibly rich country is even worser.

Tough decision.

when all our documents will be locked in a proprietary cloud

No, you have stored them on a server, in fact any sane organization already stores all their documents on a server. They are not "locked" there, you could equally store them locally if you want. Did you not know that?

Nice. Stop paying Office 365 and try to get your documents. :-)

Storing your documents in the cloud, the way we're doing now (granted, it's not the only way), is like storing private data on Facebook. You can't expect integrity in the former in the same way you can't expect privacy in the latter.

You didn't knew that, right?

that anyone with the right influence will have access

So now it is a conspiracy? The defeatist has not heard of encryption? Or not storing sensitive data on a server you do not control? Anyone with the right influence could put a backdoor in the open source software too and they wouldnt have to go through Microsoft to get one put in Windows.

Microsoft software may not be a good choice but dont be so dimwitted as to think open source is some silver bullet that solves all the problems you pointed out.

You take it on the wrong side. =]

WHen you store your documents in the cloud, the software is irrelevant. Doesn't matter if you're using open ou closed source software, the server's owner can do whatever he wants and you'll never know.

Now... About that encryption thing....

Comment: All that money... (Score 4, Insightful) 570

by Lisias (#47699203) Attached to: Munich Reverses Course, May Ditch Linux For Microsoft

Yep. And then all that money that would be used to pay salaries that would be used on expenses locally, making the local economy work, will be redirected to Bill Gate's pockets.

I remember when Munchen waived Windows, in 2004. This was noticed a lot on Open Source news, as Quilombo Digital and BR-Linux in Brazil.

I did my share of criticize - Star Office was not ready at that time for the task, and a lot of documents were locked down in a proprietary format that would be a nightmare to convert from and back to be shared. As it's nowadays, by the way.

And things are gonna be worse.

When in a few years, when all our documents will be locked in a proprietary cloud (that anyone with the right influence will have access) or stored locally in a format that you must pay to read, remember 2004.

Comment: Re:And life goes on (Score 1) 235

by Lisias (#47693417) Attached to: Email Is Not Going Anywhere

This. I deleted my facebook account 3 years ago because of all the bullshit. My wife still has one and it's gotten several orders of worse since I dropped it. The latest thing they did about how they handle messages now has her so pissed off she's considering dropping it too. They want to tie up your entire world in facebook and it becomes more than annoying.

It's weird, but I have different feelings about Facebook (other that being a piece of shit - I was happy with Orkut and didn't knew it).

But I do my part: I'm impolite and rude with spam and bulshit like "oh-my-god, is the new NAZsgulI!!". Three strikes, and they're gone - I ban the S.O.B. and problem solved.

Facebook is like real lfe (tm): tag around with people you like, avoid people you don't really like, and everything will be fine - unless you are the kind of people you don't like :-)

Comment: Re:And yet (Score 1) 268

how could these companies say with a straight face that they only want more H1B visa employees due to lack worker shortage and not because they're trying to find cheaper labor?

One thing doesn't excludes the other.

There's a man-power shortage on T.I. in the whole world, and everybody wants to pay less to the ones that are still working in the field.

Comment: Re:This obsession with everything in RAM needs to (Score 1) 161

by Lisias (#47509253) Attached to: Linux Needs Resource Management For Complex Workloads

If you're going to MARK/RELEASE why not malloc/free? Same goes for languages like Java - if you have to null a reference for it to get collected, how is that different from free() or delete? It's still a line of code you have to remember to put in your program at the right place.

For two reasons:

1) It's easier to MARK the heap on the beginning of the task, using it as there's no tomorrow and then just RELEASE everything at once on the end. (nothing prevents you from deleting some pointers in the job to save memory).

2) You avoid HEAP fragmentation, easing the memory management's life.

Anyway, it appears to me that you missed the point. I was criticizing the pretense "no overhead garbage collector" from Azul.

Comment: Re:This obsession with everything in RAM needs to (Score 2) 161

by Lisias (#47493979) Attached to: Linux Needs Resource Management For Complex Workloads

And yes, a garbage collector with zero overhead. Who would have thought? Well, pretty much anyone in the know, I guess.

MARK / RELEASE from the Pascal days used to work pretty well - this is the less overhead "garbage collector" possible.

It's impossible to have a Garbage Collector without some kind of overhead - all you can do is try to move the overhead to a place where it's not noticed.

There's no such thing as Free Lunch.

Comment: Re:This obsession with everything in RAM needs to (Score 5, Insightful) 161

by Lisias (#47492649) Attached to: Linux Needs Resource Management For Complex Workloads

I know you're afraid of the garbage collector, but it won't bite. I promise.

Yes, it will. It's not common, but it happens - and when it happens, it's nasty. Pretty nasty.

But not so nasty as micromanaging the memory by myself, so I keep licking my wounds and moving on with it.

(but sometimes would be nice to have fine control on it)

It is better to give than to lend, and it costs about the same.

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