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Submission + - Body Implants are Turning Us into the Cyberpunks We've Read About (hackaday.com)

szczys writes: Body modification has been growing in popularity. It's pretty common to see people with multiple piercings or stretched earlobes (called gauging). With this wider acceptance has risen a specific subset of Biohacking that seeks to add technology to your body through implants and other augmentation. The commonly available tech right now includes the addition of a magnet in your fingertip, or an RFID chip in your hand to unlock doors and start your car. Cameron Coward looked into this movement — called Grinding — to ask what it's like to live with tech implants, and where the future will take us.

Submission + - There is No .bro in Brotli: Google/Mozilla Engineers Nix File Type as Offensive 1

theodp writes: Several weeks ago, Google launched Brotli, a new open source compression algorithm for the web. Since then, controversy broke out over the choice of 'bro' as the content encoding type. "We are hoping to establish a file ending .bro for brotli compressed files, a command line tool 'bro' for compressing and uncompressing brotli files, and a accept/content encoding type 'bro'," explained Google software engineer Jyrki Alakuijala. "Can I talk you out of it?," replied Mozilla SW engineer Patrick McManus. "'bro' has a gender problem, even though the dual meaning is unintentional. It comes of[f] misogynistic and unprofessional due to the world it lives in." Despite some pushback from commenters, a GitHub commit made by Google's Zoltan Szabadka shows that there will be no '.bro' in Brotli. "I have asked a feminist friend from the North American culture-sphere, and she advised against bro," explained Alakuijala. "We have found a compromise that satisfies us, so we don't need to discuss this further. Even if we don't understand why people are upset from our cultural standpoint, they would be (unnecessarily) upset and this is enough reason not to use it."

Submission + - Open-Source Doom 3 Advances With EAX Audio, 64-bit ARM/x86 Support (phoronix.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Dhewm3, one of the leading implementations of the Doom 3 engine built off the open-source id Tech 4 engine, has released a new version of the GPL-licensed engine that takes Doom 3 far beyond where it was left off by id Software. The newest code has full SDL support, OpenAL + OpenAL EFX for audio, 64-bit x86/ARM support, better support for widescreen resolutions, and CMake build system support on Linux/Windows/OSX/FreeBSD. This new open-source code can be downloaded from Dhewm3 on GitHub but continues to depend upon the retail Doom 3 game assets.

Submission + - Microsoft started to shut down Nokia Foundation in Brazil (d24am.com) 4

lskbr writes: After Nokia acquisition, Microsoft kept the Nokia Foundation (http://www.fundacaonokia.org/) open, until the announcement this week that new applications are now suspended. The Nokia Foundation was the largest social project of Nokia providing technical high school education in different areas like Informatics (CS), Electronics and Mechatronics among others. The institution is installed in an industrial zone in Manaus, Amazonas, in the heart of the Brazilian Amazon. After 30 years, the Nokia Foundation (created by Sharp, than maintained by Nokia and now Microsoft) successfully prepared thousands of students with high quality standards, some of them are now working for Microsoft itself, as well as other companies around the world. The suspension of new applications for 2016 was announced just a few months before the competition that new applicants are subject before enrollment. As a social project, this school accepts 70% of its new students from public schools. The Nokia Foundation work was very well placed on Brazilian technology competitions like the Brazilian Olympiads in Informatics, Mathematics, Chemistry, Robotics and the Brazilian National Course Examination (kind of SAT for high schools), being the best technical school in the North, Northeast and Middle-west regions of the country. This short notice lets the Nokia Foundation in a very bad position and no time to find a new maintainer. In a world that claims for more STEM education, why are they closing a technical high school in the Third World?

Submission + - Amazon Escalates Its Battle Against Publishers (nytimes.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Just weeks after the retailing giant began pressuring the publisher on pricing by delaying shipping and cutting discounts, it is now refusing orders for coming books. The retailer began refusing orders late Thursday for coming Hachette books, including J.K. Rowling’s new novel. The paperback edition of Brad Stone’s “The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon” — a book Amazon disliked so much it denounced it — is suddenly listed as “unavailable.” In some cases, even the pages promoting the books have disappeared. Anne Rivers Siddons’s new novel, “The Girls of August,” coming in July, no longer has a page for the physical book or even the Kindle edition. Only the audio edition is still being sold (for more than $60). Otherwise it is as if it did not exist. Amazon is also flexing its muscles in Germany, delaying deliveries of books issued by Bonnier, a major publisher.

Submission + - The Technical Difficulty In Porting a PS3 Game to the PS4 (edge-online.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Last of Us was one of the last major projects for the PlayStation 3. The code optimization done by development studio Naughty Dog was a real technical achievement — making graphics look modern and impressive on a 7-year-old piece of hardware. Now, they're in the process of porting it to the much more capable PS4, which will end up being a technical accomplishment in its own right. Creative director Neil Druckmann said, 'Just getting an image onscreen, even an inferior one with the shadows broken, lighting broken and with it crashing every 30 seconds that took a long time. These engineers are some of the best in the industry and they optimised the game so much for the PS3’s SPUs specifically. It was optimised on a binary level, but after shifting those things over [to PS4] you have to go back to the high level, make sure the [game] systems are intact, and optimise it again. I can't describe how difficult a task that is. And once it’s running well, you’re running the [versions] side by side to make sure you didn't screw something up in the process, like physics being slightly off, which throws the game off, or lighting being shifted and all of a sudden it’s a drastically different look. That’s not ‘improved’ any more; that’s different. We want to stay faithful while being better.'

Submission + - Free software foundation condemns Mozilla's move to support DRM in Firefox. (fsf.org)

ptr_88 writes: Free software foundation has opposed Mozilla's move to support DRM in Firefox browser partnership with Adobe. This is what FSF has to say about this move : The Free Software Foundation is deeply disappointed in Mozilla's announcement. The decision compromises important principles in order to alleviate misguided fears about loss of browser market share. It allies Mozilla with a company hostile to the free software movement and to Mozilla's own fundamental ideals .

Submission + - Employees Admit They'd Walk Out With Stolen Data If Fired (threatpost.com)

Gunkerty Jeb writes: In a recent survey of IT managers and executives, nearly half of respondents admitted that if they were fired tomorrow they would walk out with proprietary data such as privileged password lists, company databases, R&D plans and financial reports — even though they know they are not entitled to it. So, it's no surprise that 71 percent believe the insider threat is the priority security concern and poses the most significant business risk. Despite growing awareness of the need to better monitor privileged accounts, only 57 percent say they actively do so. The other 43 percent weren't sure or knew they didn't. And of those that monitored, more than half said they could get around the current controls.

"Survey says..." -- Richard Dawson, weenie, on "Family Feud"