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Comment Re:This just in... (Score 1) 168

A Boeing 787 bound for Paris from New York mysteriously landed instead at Reykjavik, Iceland today. Boeing pilots say that there was no indication of failure of onboard navigation systems. "It's a mystery" commented one Boeing engineer.

When asked to comment, an Airbus representative opined "Tough luck for Boeing".

Link, or it didn't happen.

Here!

Comment Re:Management (Score 1) 210

I'll thread this under here - I saw your comment below. I finally got the error on a box, the login issue. I resolved it by simply deleting the Slashdot cookies (all of them - there are quite a few) and any local storage associated with the site. Then I logged in again and all was good. I suspect it may have something to do with them adding https for the login.

*THANK YOU VERY MUCH* :-)

Comment Re:Management (Score 1) 210

For me, filtering the information is just a way to :
1) allow the team to work without interruption
2) obtain a clear description of the goal
3) distribute the work in function of the availability of people. If project could ask directly to the devs, it will be always the same guy who works.

If you agree that the word "proxying" can be used instead of "filtering", I can agree with you. It appears that we disagree only on the choose of words. :)

Comment Re:What management does (Score 1) 210

(sigh) Let's try again.

Communication is the main task (and, IMHO, should be the sole one) of managers.

No. I mean exactly what I said.

Budgeting, staffing, scheduling, planning, negotiating and a lot more must be done by people that knows exactly the consequences of their decisions. If the guy that does this all effectively has the skills to do that correctly, the guy's skills shouldn't be being wasted on non productive tasks. This guy should be doing active development!

You mean except for budgeting, staffing, scheduling, conflict resolution, planning, reporting, coaching, motivating, forecasting, negotiating, delegating, and the thousand other things a manager actually has to do in the real world?

If you think communication is the only thing a manager should have to do you are pretty clueless about what it takes to manage a group of people. Effective management is a hell of a lot more than just "communication".

If you think that MANAGEMENT should do anything else, you are delusional or you make money convincing people otherwise. :-)

Managers should MANAGE. Nothing more.

Managers don't take decisions. Managers manage the decision taking.

Managers don't do budgeting. Managers manage the budgeting process.

Managers don't plan. Managers manage the planning process.

Managers don't solve conflicts. Managers manage the conflict solving process.

And so on.

Reporting, coaching, etc are COMMUNICATION tasks - where Managers should excel.

Comment Re:What management does (Score 1) 210

Your list suggests that you aren't doing enough delegating, even if you're at a small company.

Alternatively, it suggests the he works on a third world company - where managers lives the illusion that they are the main and most important hole on development, being the developer's themselves just tools being used by the "master".

Comment Re:What management does (Score 1) 210

You mean except for budgeting, staffing, scheduling, conflict resolution, planning, reporting, coaching, motivating, forecasting, negotiating, delegating, and the thousand other things a manager actually has to do in the real world?

No. I mean exactly what I said.

Budgeting, staffing, scheduling, planning, coaching, negotiating and a lot more must be done by people that knows exactly the consequences of their decisions. If the guy that does this all effectively has the skills to do that correctly, the guy's skills shouldn't be being wasted on non productive tasks. This guy should be doing active development!

If you think communication is the only thing a manager should have to do you are pretty clueless about what it takes to manage a group of people. Effective management is a hell of a lot more than just "communication".

If you think that MANAGEMENT should do anything else, you are delusional or you make money convincing people otherwise. :-)

Managers should MANAGE. Nothing more.

Managers don't take decisions. Managers manage the decision taking.

Managers don't do budgeting. Managers manage the budgeting process.

Managers don't plan. Managers manage the planning process.

Managers don't solve conflicts. Managers manage the conflict solving process.

And so on.

Reporting, coaching, etc are COMMUNICATION tasks - where Managers should excel.

Comment Re:Management (Score 2) 210

Unfortunately, puritanical countries such as the US - which has the UK's classist legacy, compounded over the last 35 years by the neoliberal disease - views management as "wealth creators" and workers as "in their place". This has coincided with the decline of US economic supremacy.

If you think "puritans" are classicists, try to get a job on Portuguese colonized country.

Seriously, "doing work" here is demerit. The ones that get promoted are the ones that avoid working themselves.

Comment Re:Management (Score 1) 210

No, I think that being an effective *filter* is the main task of a manager. Communicate and prioritize the requirements from above that make sense; but block ones that are stupid or not worth it

As soon as the manager starts to filter information, it starts to take decisions indirectly about the project. If the guy knows the matter, it does it right. However, if the guy knows enough to know what to filter, the guy should not be being wasted on communications - the guy should be in a active hole on development.

Managers should manage. And nothing more.

Communicate the needs of the team up to management (again, ones that make sense) and make sure they get addressed. And, most of all, block the constant stream of questions and requests from sales/marketing/support, and force them to all pass through you. That way you (a) will soon recognize who brings reasonable requests, and who does not; (b) get to know which areas of the product get the most questions, and so may need work; and (c) allow your team to work mostly uninterrupted.

You're right that under-communication is an evil sin; but so is over-communication.

So in the bottom like, I got it right from the start. I said that Managers should communicate. :-)

And there's no such thing as "over-communication". What exists is communication to the wrong audience.

Comment Re:From a former editor (Score 1) 325

"First is highly specialized knowledge..." Explain then why people with exactly that kind of knowledge can't get their information through page sitting editors.

It's exactly what i was going to post.

I'm in a group of retrocomputing enthusiasts. We dig, bid, pursue and beyond for pisces of history of he computer industry - mainly from my own country. Problem is, n this process, we find out facts and curiosities that we just can't publish on Wikipedia.

That would be alright - except that someone else had published facts and misinformation that we know for sure about the veracity - as we own the product, the official advertising material (sometimes even the original piece) and the official manuals.

So, the current status quo is that some SOB gets there first, publish anything he thinks it's right and make a hell of a fuss against every single further contribution, no matter the source. Once I saw one editor making a insane broad interpretation for what's a "blog", to justify ignoring a technical article printed in a online service. By that interpretation, the very damned Wikipedia is a blog, god damnit.

I don't know the extension of such bigotry, but it's for sure plays a significant (even if not deterministic) hole on the problem - I just quit trying to contributing to Wikipedia, and speaking frankly, even reduced the use of it for articles on my own tongue where the problem appears to be worst. I know english (kind of, at least), so I don't need to rely on half baked articles, I can go directly to the original article - where, at least apparently, such bigotry don't affects too much the quality of the material.

Comment Re:LESSON NUMBER #1 (Score 1) 118

Agile is the death of quality!

Not necessarily. In my hands, I guarantee you that Agile can deliver Quality.

However, I had worked in a Quality Control team before, and after, in a Quality Assurance one. So I know what must be done and why, so I know when some tests can be postponed, and what tests would be useless in a given moment.

The fallacy on the Agile movement is believing that all you need is coders. Worst, they think that TWO Quality ignorant developers together will compensate for the lack of formal testing. You can't give what you don't own - you need Quality Assurance and Control aware guys in your team.

Two pregnant women don't deliver a baby each six months - and you will need a father to raise the child after. But yet, it's common sense in Agile that you can lock up two women in a room and expect two childs a year - and nobody cares about the kids after they are born.

Comment Re:LESSON NUMBER #1 (Score 1) 118

Makes me wonder then why every developer I met so far (about 100) is fatally allergic to bug fixing. They rather fake their own death than fix bugs that they put into the code. Commonly, they just state "This is not a bug!" or "This was never requested!" effectively dismissing QA having any clue or say in the matter. QA is not the bad guys, QA is a mirror that developers can stand to look into....entirely self-inflicted!

You need new friends, i mean, developers.

You get what you promotes. If you promotes bad developers, you will get bad developments.

Yes, please, write bad code if that helps you learn, but then, please, fix it once you know better and don't give me all that BS. And stop discussing and triaging bug reports, go and fix the issues. Takes typically way less time than the discussion aimed at convincing everyone not to do anything.

And by all means, fire the fscking bastards that don't fix their mess. You get what you promotes.

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