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Comment: Re:Dirty power (Score 1) 224

by Pharmboy (#47411463) Attached to: My most recent energy-saving bulbs last ...

Generally speaking, anything with lots of parts has more points of failures. Since CFLs all have ballasts, my experience has been that spikes does take a toll, by virtue of them dying after the storm.an incandescent is just a big resister. Yes, it can break but it is fairly tolerant by virtue of being tungsten and having no other parts. This is why I spend the money for the better CFLs. I've been using CFLs for well over a decade now. Been using them since the 90s, so not an expert, but I've owned a lot of them.

+ - FPGA for Makers: The Dream of Drag and Drop Circuits-> 12

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "FPGA's are great, but learning VHDL/Verilog can be a daunting task! This new Kickstarter project has a unique new idea so simple that it just might put FPGA's into the hands of Makers everywhere. It's as simple as pairing an FPGA with an Arduino and creating software that lets Makers draw circuits. Instead of learning a new programming language Makers can draw circuits right away using open source building blocks such as stepper controllers, audio chips, video chips, and even a bitcoin miner. Circuits are loaded to the FPGA and then controlled by the Arduino. It's a very simple arrangement with mind boggling possibilities — everything from bitcoin mining, embedded vision, robotics, to reconfigurable System on Chip designs."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Police (Score 1) 584

by Pharmboy (#47050055) Attached to: Gun Rights Groups Say They Don't Oppose Smart Guns, Just Mandates

"Junior has permission to use this gun, but only at these times"

Are you fucking kidding me? This isn't a toy or an internet device, it is a self defense tool. I think that mandating "smart" guns is stupid, but this is even more stupid. Most people can't even program their DVR, and you want them to program a GUN?

The beautiful thing about a gun is its simplicity: simple point and click interface. Add some basic safety and legal training, and the average person is just fine without any "smarts" to foolishly rely on.

Comment: Re:Guess they overestimated some. (Score 1) 131

by Pharmboy (#47025215) Attached to: Pentagon Document Lays Out Battle Plan Against Zombies

I'm glad to see that even the ACs around here see the benefit of this. I read enough of the article (really) to get a pretty good feel, and wondered if /.ers were going to trash or praise the idea. As a training tool, it is pretty useful, more practical ways than it might seem at first glance, as it is fun enough to keep people's attention when being trained.

And yes, there are some real life parallels to zombies, like the AC said, or rapidly spreading infectious disease. Interesting stuff.

Comment: Re:It's the conversation, (Score 2) 367

by Pharmboy (#46598687) Attached to: More Than 1 In 4 Car Crashes Involve Cellphone Use

Actually, you are saying that PROFESSIONAL drivers have conversations and don't get into abnormal amounts of wrecks. Ok, I believe that. The bad part is that most drivers are amateurs.

I drive two hours a day on the interstate (not a "professional", just reasonably cautious with phone features built into car and never text and drive). You would be amazed at how many "professional" truck drivers I see crossing the line while fiddling with a phone. Whether they are texting or calling, I don't know. I don't see this daily, but I do see it about once a week. I85 in NC.

Comment: How does the carpooling thing work? (Score 1) 405

by Experiment 626 (#46510151) Attached to: Paris Bans Half of All Cars On the Road
It's one thing to need 3+ people in a car to use the HOV lane, but how does this promote carpooling if you make ALL the roads in town illegal with 1-2 people in the car? The first guy can't go pick the other up, and at the end of the day if you're down to two passengers, you can't drop either of them off.

Comment: Re:Another Tesla story? (Score 1) 318

by Experiment 626 (#46340097) Attached to: Consumer Reports Says Tesla Model S Is Best Overall Vehicle

I get the Slashdot love for autonomous cars. Running off of computer, pushing the limits of AI, society having to come to terms with legal and liability issues raised by new technology. Good stuff.

But why should running off of electricity somehow make a car interesting? Because it's "new"? No, people have experimented with electric cars since the 19th century, the main difference now is we have batteries that make it semi-practical. Because storing power in a battery gives it something in common with geeky devices like laptops and tablets? Because some geeks also happen to be into environmental causes? Seriously, what is so exciting about this car that it gets so many Slashdot stories?

Comment: Re:Another Tesla story? (Score 1) 318

by Experiment 626 (#46339829) Attached to: Consumer Reports Says Tesla Model S Is Best Overall Vehicle
I have to disagree with you there. The Hennessey Venom GT's 270.49 mph run on the space shuttle landing strip was a far more interesting technological accomplishment than this, and completely ignored by the Slashdot editors. Why should a car somehow count as "interesting technology" because electricity makes it go? So what, golf carts can do that.

"And do you think (fop that I am) that I could be the Scarlet Pumpernickel?" -- Looney Tunes, The Scarlet Pumpernickel (1950, Chuck Jones)

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