Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:not protects (Score 1) 1066

by LexNaturalis (#33612312) Attached to: HDCP Master Key Is Legitimate; Blu-ray Is Cracked
Try the Oxford English Dictionary. The definition it cites is:

3. a. A person or company who reproduces or uses the work of another (as a book, recording, computer program, etc.) without authority and esp. in contravention of patent or copyright; a plagiarist. Also: a thing reproduced or used in this way.

The first quote it provides is from 1608. It also provides quotes from 1668, 1703, 1758, 1822, 1887, 1928, and 1996. I would consider a word in use for over 400 years to be "old", but that's just me.

Comment: Re:Duh (Score 1) 561

by fahrbot-bot (#31739556) Attached to: Young Men Who Smoke Have Lower IQs

since I liked my first puff of cigarette smoke I was addicted from the first puff.

Not at all and you're correct that physical addiction takes some (variable) amount of time, depending on the substance. That said, I find it very hard to believe you actually liked/enjoyed your first N cigarettes. The motivators to take up smoking are varied, but "enjoy" in the common sense of the word isn't one of them. Thoughts to the contrary are, I suspect, rose-colored remembrances.

Comment: Re:CmdrTaco drags big brass ones along the ground (Score 0, Flamebait) 750

by elrous0 (#31737632) Attached to: iPad Review
It's fine to develop a whole new category of devices. But if you're going to do so, it follows that you should start by at least defining who your audience is and what the purpose of the device is. And many of us simply can't figure out the point of this thing. Of course the die-hard Macheads would happily shell out cash if Steve Jobs took a crap on a plate and sold it as the iShit, but why should someone who's not just an Apple fan in general want one? So it's not an iPhone or a netbook, okay that's fine, but what exactly is it then and why should we buy it? Aside from some typical Apple doublespeak, I've yet to hear a good answer.
Programming

Programming As Art — 13 Amazing Code Demos 210

Posted by Zonk
from the i-know-it-when-i-see-it dept.
cranberryzero writes "The demo scene has been around for twenty years now, and it has grown by leaps and bounds. From the early days of programmers pushing the limits of Ataris and Amigas to modern landscapes with full lighting, mapping, and motion capture, demo groups have done it all and done it under 100k. To celebrate this art form, I heart Chaos takes a look at thirteen of the best demo programs on the web. Flash video links are included, but it's more fun to download them and give your processor something fun to chew on."

Laser Turns All Metals Black 333

Posted by Zonk
from the bzoooom-whaaaawwwww dept.
Roland Piquepaille writes "Researchers at the University of Rochester have found a way to change the properties of almost any metal by using a femtosecond laser pulse. This ultra-intense laser blast creates true 'black metal' from copper, gold or zinc by forming nanostructures at the surface of the metal. As these nanostructures capture radiation, the metals turn black. And as the process needs surprisingly low power, it could soon be used for a variety of applications, such as stealth planes, black jewels or car paintings. But read more for additional references and a picture of this femtosecond laser system."

How to Hack the Vote and Steal the Election 587

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the vote-early-vote-often dept.
divisionbyzero writes "Many people have asked for it so that the government will have to deal with it. So here it is: a guide to stealing an election that uses electronic voting machines written by Jon Stokes over at Arstechnica. From the article: "In all this time, I've yet to find a good way to convey to the non-technical public how well and truly screwed up we presently are, six years after the Florida recount. So now it's time to hit the panic button: In this article, I'm going to show you how to steal an election.""

The Myth of the 40 Hour Game 428

Posted by Zonk
from the simple-solution-is-not-to-have-a-life dept.
Over at Wired, Clive Thompson talks about the myth of the 40 hour game, the typical length of time listed on the side of a game box nowadays. Mr. Thompsons discusses the ways in which that estimate fails to jive with reality. From the article: "This game offers about 40 hours of play. This is precisely what I was told by Eidos — and countless game reviewers — when I picked up Tomb Raider: Legend earlier this year. As I gushed at the time, Legend was the first genuinely superb Lara Croft game in years... I was hooked — and eager to finish the game and solve the mystery. So I shoved it into my PS2, dual-wielded the pistols and began playing... until about four weeks later, when I finally threw in the towel. Why? Because I couldn't get anywhere near the end. I plugged away at the game whenever I could squeeze an hour away from my day job and my family. All told, I spent far more than 40 hours — but still only got two-thirds through."

Charge in 5 minutes, Drive 500 miles? 319

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the shocking-discoveries dept.
ctroutwi writes "In the wake of rising gasoline costs there have been plenty of alternatives seen on the horizon. Including Hybrids, Biofuels, fuel cells and battery powered all electric cars. CNN has recently posted a story about a company (EEStor) that plans on offering Ultra-Capacitor storage products. The claim being that you charge the ultra-capacitor in 5 minutes, with approximately 9$ (~$.45 a gallon) of electricity and then drive 500 miles."

Jailed Spam King Caught Conspiring to Kill Witness 290

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the spam-mafioso dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Spam king Christopher William Smith, aka Rizler, is facing up to life in prison for conspiracy to tamper with a witness and up to 20 years for endeavoring to obstruct justice. The charges are based on an alleged phone call in which he threatened to have a witness or the witness' family killed to prevent them from testifying against him in an upcoming trial on drug and related charges.

SCOTUS To Hear Patentable Thought Case 394

Posted by Zonk
from the get-out-of-my-head dept.
skayell writes "The Supreme Court of the United States will hear a landmark patent case involving whether or not thoughts and relationships are patentable. Michael Crichton's essay in the New York Times attempts a thoughtful summary of Metabolite's primary assertion: they not only own the connection between homocysteine levels in the blood and vitamin B12 deficiency, but also any thought connecting the two."

The reason that every major university maintains a department of mathematics is that it's cheaper than institutionalizing all those people.

Working...