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Submission + - China Claimed Millions of Computers Hacked by U.S.-based Servers (xinhuanet.com)

hackingbear writes: While we have heard reports of computers being hacked from China almost every other day, China's National Computer Network Emergency Response Centre identified 7.8 million computers in China had been hacked in the first six months of last year, with the most common location of the attackers being in the US (pay wall). According to CNCERT, 73,286 overseas IPs were involved in hacking China’s 14.19 million IPs, among which 10.5 million received attacks from US-based servers, 780,000 from South Korea and 778,000 from Germany. Apparently, as neither side can prove their claims or disprove the other's claims with absolutely indisputable evidences, the war of words will keep going.

Submission + - Ball Lightning Caused By Magnetic Hallucinations (technologyreview.com) 3

KentuckyFC writes: Transcranial magnetic stimulation involves placing a human in a rapidly changing magnetic field that is powerful enough to induce eddy currents in the brain. Focus the field in the visual cortex, for example, and the induced eddys cause the subject to 'see' lights that appear as discs and lines. Move the the field within the cortex and the subject sees the lights move too. But if this happens in the lab, then why not in the real world too, say physicists who have calculated that the fields associated with certain kinds of multiple lightning strikes are powerful enough to induce the same kind of visual hallucinations in anybody unlucky enough to be within 200 metres or so. These fields ought to induce hallucinations similar to those experienced in the lab. These would take the form of luminous lines and balls that float in front of the subject's eyes, an effect that would explain observations otherwise classed as ball lightning, say the scientists.

16.5 feet in the Twilight Zone = 1 Rod Serling