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Hardware Hacking

Ben Heck's PS3 Slim Laptop 84

Posted by Soulskill
from the making-small-bigger dept.
We've occasionally discussed Ben Heckendorn's various console modifications, and he's now come out with a new one: a laptop version of the PS3 Slim. It has volume control buttons for the built-in speakers, and plenty of vents for cooling. The display is a 17" widescreen panel, and the Slim's hardware doesn't fill that much space in the case, so there's a neat little compartment for the power cord. Ben's blog post shows details of the laptop's construction.

Comment: Re:Wait, what? (Score 1) 103

by LeninZhiv (#26242877) Attached to: Streaming Video Service Coming To the Wii

You can play Guitar Hero DLC from an SD card, but yeah, I agree with you that this doesn't really sound like something that fits in with the Wii universe. Unlike the HD consoles, both of which set out to be media centers. When the Wii launched they were explicit that they did not want it to be one, which is why it doesn't play DVD movies even though it has a DVD drive.

Comment: Re:It's not just you (Score 1) 366

by LeninZhiv (#25816597) Attached to: AIX On the Desktop Is Getting the Boot

Yes, CDE is still included in Solaris (as of version 9, but I'd be surprised if 10 didn't have it), including the free version of Solaris Intel. Gnome is the default, but it's there for anyone who's feeling nostalgic.

Solaris Intel also runs on VirtualBox, so there's no excuse for anyone not to be running CDE who wants it :-)

Comment: rev (Score 1) 2362

by LeninZhiv (#25649065) Attached to: (Useful) Stupid Unix Tricks?

The rev command has got to be one of the most useless Unix commands I've ever come across. It's almost as if someone's first c program somehow got taken up as a part of standard Unix! Maybe in the days before sed and awk and perl it had some function in pipes that I can't grok, but nowadays other than making hints for video game websites I can't imagine what it's for.

Google

Google's Shareholders Vote Against Human Rights 376

Posted by kdawson
from the easier-not-to-be-evil-before-the-ipo dept.
yo_cruyff notes a Computerworld article on Google's recent annual shareholder meeting, which was dominated by argument over the company's human rights policies. Google's shareholders, on advice from their board, have voted down two proposals on Thursday that would have compelled Google to change its policies. "Google [has been] coming under fire for operating a version of its search engine that complies with China's censorship rules. Google argues that it's better for it to have a presence in the country and to offer people some information, rather than for it not to be active in China at all... [S]hareholders and rights groups including Amnesty International... continue to push Google to improve its policies in countries known for human rights abuses and limits on freedom of speech... Sergey Brin, cofounder and president of technology for Google, abstained from voting on either of the proposals. 'I agreed with the spirit of these proposals,' Brin said. But he said he didn't fully support them as they were written, and so did not want to vote for them."
The Courts

Class Action Complaint Against RIAA Now Online 176

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the stuff-to-read-if-you're-insane dept.
NewYorkCountryLawyer writes "Recommended reading for all interested in the RIAA's litigation war against p2p file sharing is the amended class action complaint just filed in Oregon in Andersen v. Atlantic. This landmark 109-page document (pdf) tells both the general story of the RIAA's campaign against ordinary folks, and the specific story of its harassment of Tanya Andersen, and even of her young daughter. The complaint includes federal and state RICO claims, as well as other legal theories, and alleges that "The world's four major recording studios had devised an illegal enterprise intent on maintaining their virtually complete monopoly over the distribution of recorded music." The point has been made by one commentator that the RIAA won't be able to weasel its out of this one by simply withdrawing it; this one, they will have to answer for. If the relief requested in the complaint is granted, the RIAA's entire campaign will be shut down for good."

Sony Reader Now Available 402

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the my-book-is-out-of-batteries dept.
Yaksha42 writes "The Sony Reader, which debuted at CES in January, is now available for purchase on the Sony website. The six inch screen uses E Ink, rather than an LCD, to display the text, reducing strain on the eye while reading. While you can buy books on Sony's Connect site, you can also load eBooks and other text onto the Reader in a variety of formats, including PDF and TXT files. It also comes with the ability to receive newsfeeds, display JPG images, and can play unsecured MP3 and AAC music files. Additional information can also be found on the Learning Center site."

Breaking Gender Cliques at Work? 806

Posted by Cliff
from the be-nice-gentlemen dept.
An anonymous reader asks: "No-one likes finding themselves being the 'odd one out' of a clique, and gender barriers make them harder to break. The question is simple: what can a girl in IT do when she finds herself on the outside of those cliques of boy coworkers? Or inversely, what should groups of boys at work be doing to be more welcoming for that lone girl in the IT office?"

How are 'Secret Questions' Secure? 116

Posted by Cliff
from the security-versus-usability dept.
Anonymous Howard wonders: "It seems that every authentication system these days requires me to provide the answers to several personal questions, such as 'Mother's Maiden Name' and 'Name of High School' for resetting lost passwords. I've always disliked this method because it is completely open to anyone with some personal information about me, but now it seems that its security continues to degrade as more and more Help Desk Reps can easily see this same information about me. Can anyone explain to me how these questions/answers, which seem to vary little among systems, are in the least bit secure?" You have to have some way of identifying yourself if you forget your password. If you feel the same way about these 'secret questions', how would you implement a secure facility to change passwords?

IE7 to be Pushed to Users Via Windows Update 608

Posted by samzenpus
from the have-some-explorer dept.
dfrick writes "CNET is reporting that IE7 will be pushed to users via Windows Update. This has serious implications for e-commerce websites whose functionality might be affected by any bugs in the software. Also to have end users suddenly using a new browser right before the holiday shopping season could magnify the cost any bugs that might create a bad user experience on sites."

Light-Weight Software Process for ISO 9000? 56

Posted by Cliff
from the distilled-to-its-bare-essence dept.
Disgruntled Software Engineer asks: "I work for a large engineering firm and it was recently decided in our company to have our software be ISO 9000 compliant. There exists a software development process in my organization, but it is extremely heavy-weight -- over two-dozen documents totaling 200 pages each! My team doesn't even have the time to read such a process, much less abide by it. I have been tasked by my team in creating a more light-weight process for our team to follow so that our software can pass the audit that is coming soon, but reading through the convoluted ISO website is not helping, and a 'plain English translation' that I found of the standard contains a bulleted list that is 17 pages long! I have not been able to get any idea of how to design a light-weight software engineering process that is ISO 9000 compliant with all of these extremely verbose documents and somewhat odd requirements. Also, the software that my team produces is more for research than for productization, and the dynamic nature of research does not mix well with the rigidity of a software process. What are the bare-minimum set of requirements for ISO 9000 software engineering compliance? What are some tips for designing a process that is light-weight and causes minimal damage in terms of efficient software development? Do you have any interesting experiences or wisdom regarding ISO 9000 and software engineering?"

Linux/Mac/Windows File Name Friction 638

Posted by Hemos
from the like-doing-it-with-sandpaper dept.
lessthan0 writes "In 1995, Microsoft added long file name support to Windows, allowing more descriptive names than the limited 8.3 DOS format. Mac users scoffed, having had long file names for a decade and because Windows still stored a DOS file name in the background. Linux was born with long file name support four years before it showed up in Windows. Today, long file names are well supported by all three operating systems though key differences remain. "

You can bring any calculator you like to the midterm, as long as it doesn't dim the lights when you turn it on. -- Hepler, Systems Design 182

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