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Comment Re: in-vehicle concierge (Score 1) 417

Think On-Star where you say "hey, can you find me a Sushi restaurant?"

Apparently that is an actual thing, I'm not sure.

We used to call that Yellow Pages, but now there's an app for that. Of course real drivers don't eat sushi, but a passenger might.

Submission + - The bog bodies of Europe->

schwit1 writes: The peat bogs preserve the bodies, providing scientists a window into the past. However, many of the bodies exhibit one mysterious tendency: violent death.

Since the 18th century, the peat bogs of Northern Europe have yielded hundreds of human corpses dating from as far back as 8,000 B.C. Like Tollund Man, many of these so-called bog bodies are exquisitely preserved-their skin, intestines, internal organs, nails, hair, and even the contents of their stomachs and some of their clothes left in remarkable condition. Despite their great diversity-they comprise men and women, adults and children, kings and commoners-a surprising number seem to have been violently dispatched and deliberately placed in bogs, leading some experts to conclude that the bogs served as mass graves for offed outcasts and religious sacrifices. Tollund Man, for example, had evidently been hanged.

It is a fascinating combination of history, archeology, and forensics.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - EFF releases Privacy Badger an addon that algorithmically blocks online trackers->

zfc writes: Online tracking has become a pervasive invisible reality of the modern web. Most sites you load are likely to be full of ads, tracking pixels, social media share buttons, and other invisible trackers all harvesting data about your web browsing. These trackers use cookies and other methods to read unique IDs associated with your browser, the result being that they record all the sites you visit as you browse around the internet.

This sort of tracking is invisible to most web users, meaning they never get the option to agree to or opt-out of it. Today EFF has launched the 1.0 version of Privacy Badger, an extension designed to prevent these trackers from accessing unique info about you and your browsing.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Britain shuts off 750,000 streetlights with no impact on crime or crashes->

Flash Modin writes: English cities are hard up for cash as the national government dolls out cuts. And in response, the country's councils — local governing bodies — have slashed costs by turning off an estimated 750,000 streetlights. Fans of the night sky and reduced energy usage are happy, but the move has also sparked a national debate. The Automobile Association claims six people have died as a direct result of dimming the lights. But a new study released Wednesday looked at 14 years of data from 63 local authorities across England and Wales and found that residents' chances of being attacked, robbed, or struck by a car were no worse on the darker streets.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - OwnStar Device Can Remotely Find, Unlock and Start GM Cars

Trailrunner7 writes: Car hacking just jumped up a few levels. A security researcher has built a small device that can intercept the traffic from the OnStar RemoteLink mobile app and give him persistent access to a user’s vehicle to locate, unlock, and start it.

The device is called OwnStar and it’s the creation of Samy Kamkar, a security researcher and hardware hacker who makes a habit of finding clever ways around the security of various systems, including garage doors, wireless keyboards, and drones. His newest creation essentially allows him to take remote control of users’ vehicles simply by sending a few special packets to the OnStar service. The attack is a car thief’s dream.

Kamkar said that by standing near a user who has the RemoteLink mobile app open, he can use the OwnStar device to intercept requests from the app to the OnStar service. He can then take over control of the functions that RemoteLink handles, including unlocking and remotely starting the vehicle.

Submission + - UK trade union sues Uber over taxi-drivers' rights->

An anonymous reader writes: The GMB, one of the UK’s largest trade unions, announced yesterday that it would be taking legal action against U.S. taxi-hailing app Uber on grounds of unfair pay and working conditions. The union said that Uber should pay drivers the UK national minimum wage, offer paid holiday days as well as ensuring that they take breaks.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - All Your Face Are Belong To Us !!!

LeadSongDog writes: It seems the backlash to Facebook's use of facial recognition is growing. It seems the EFF is lined up against big business for what may turn out to be the last bastion of our collective delusion of privacy.
http://business.financialpost....
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-07-28/facebook-s-use-of-facial-recognition-tool-draws-privacy-concerns
http://www.biometricupdate.com/201507/privacy-advocates-criticize-facebooks-facial-recognition-policy-ntia-meetings-continue
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/sns-wp-blm-news-bc-face-recognition28-20150728-story.html

Submission + - Stretchable Conducting Fiber Provides Super Hero Capabilities->

schwit1 writes: The list of potential applications for a new electrically conducting fiber-artificial muscles, exoskeletons and morphing aircraft-sounds like something out of science fiction or a comic book. With a list like that, it's got to be a pretty special fiber... and it is. The fiber, made from sheets of carbon nanotubes wrapped around a rubber core, can be stretched to 14 times its original length and actually increase its electrical conductivity while being stretched, without losing any of its resistance.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - How Experts Stay Safe Online And What Non-Experts Can Learn From Them

An anonymous reader writes: Google researchers have asked 231 security experts and 294 web-users who aren’t security experts about their security best practices, and the list of top ones for each group differs considerably. Experts recognize the benefits of updates, while non-experts are concerned about the potential risks of software updates. Non-experts are less likely to use password managers: some find them difficult to use, some don't realize how helpful they can be, and others are simply reluctant to (as they see it) "write" passwords down. Another interesting thing to point out is that non-experts love and use antivirus software.

If I have not seen so far it is because I stood in giant's footsteps.

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