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Comment: Re:I've always thought that the best way for Israe (Score 3, Insightful) 263

by LavouraArcaica (#47439145) Attached to: A Skeptical View of Israel's Iron Dome Rocket Defense System

It's not defense, it's a rampage. Almost a genocide.
You should remember that Israel (which have one of the best armies in the world) is fighting against a ethnical group without army.
If anyone else in the world did that, We could call it a massacre, a butchery or even a genocide.

Comment: Re:Of course it was calm (Score 2, Informative) 86

by LavouraArcaica (#46636399) Attached to: 8.2 Earthquake Off the Coast of Chile, Tsunami Triggered

how in the hell a flamebait like this is modded +5 Informative?

And Chile is not a beacon of democracy: they had the worst dictatorship (and the longer) in the whole south america.
Yes, they have a good rate of gdp/capita. But mostly because they are sitting on a giant copper mine.

Comment: Re:The title says it all. (Score 5, Insightful) 2219

by LavouraArcaica (#46180673) Attached to: Slashdot Tries Something New; Audience Responds!

You're right. Always some post catches my eye, I read most of the comments. And the comments are always better than the post itself (which, by the way, is usually submitted by someone from the community). The discussion at slashdot is (most of the time) high quality. Actually, I don't know any other site with such high quality discussion (yes, it could be better, but if you feel down about the quality here, go check the discussion on youtube).

Slashdot is all about it's contributors. Without you, people, this site would be a empty shithole.

Comment: Re:Common sense? In MY judiciary? (Score 1) 457

by LavouraArcaica (#46167125) Attached to: Judge Says You Can Warn Others About Speed Traps

that's a i thing I never quite understood.
Here in Brazil, the fastest possible road is fixed at 110km/h (which is ridiculous, given that this kind of roads are the near perfect-ones). Usually a road have the speed limit of 80km/h (or 60km/h in urban areas). Why in the hell even 'economic' cars can go up to 160km/h? I would buy easily a car 10% cheaper for 40km/h less. And even if nobody else does, why the government don't enforce, let's say, 120km/h for cars?

Comment: Re:Not "US spying" - cost and technology... (Score 2) 439

by LavouraArcaica (#45737241) Attached to: US Spying Costs Boeing Military Jet Deal With Brazil

Grippen WAS the frontrunner in the beggining. The technicians from the brazilian airforce always said the grippen was better (for some reasons I don't really know).
In the last government, the french Rafale was the frontrunner. The reasons were not technical, but political: to get close to france and, maybe, get a chair at the UN backed by France.
Then the president of Brazil changed (Lula -> Dilma) and the odds changed too. The f-18 was, then, the frontrunner with the new president. But after the NSA shit, things changed back again.

Comment: Re:Rule #1 (Score 1) 894

by LavouraArcaica (#45697565) Attached to: How the Lessons of Columbine Saved Lives At Arapahoe High School

Brazilian here.
Guns are common place where I live. The thing in Brazil is that the law do not allow you to use your gun outside your property, but it's very easy to have access to guns to 'keep at home'. Anyway, it's a stupid law: if you shoot someone on the streets, the last law you are concerned it's the law about the limits of your gun.

Comment: Re:What it will be used for... (Score 3, Insightful) 178

by LavouraArcaica (#45480889) Attached to: Galileo Navigation System Gets Go-Ahead From EU Parliament

I really can't see how GPS (or galileo) (or odometer checking) could be more usefull than taxing the gas/diesel, since both systems could be cheated, but you cannot drive without gas.

And there is another point of taxing gas (versus km driven): it estimulates people to buy more economic mileage cars.

So, why change a system that (a) works and (b) it's fair to a system that can be cheated and it's not so fair?

The confusion of a staff member is measured by the length of his memos. -- New York Times, Jan. 20, 1981

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