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Comment: $10 per view? (Score 1) 160

by Lanczos (#37633986) Attached to: Indian Mathematician Takes Shot At Proving Riemann Hypothesis

If you can prove the Reimann hypothesis, do it, collect the $1000000 millennium prize and then millions more in speaking deals, chaired positions at top universities etc.

If you can't prove the Reimann hypothesis, charge $10 a head for people to watch you talk about quasicrystal nonsense.

The point being if he actually had any legitimate chance at doing this, this is not the format he would choose.

Comment: Re:Tor (Score 1) 964

by Lanczos (#35932520) Attached to: Bizarre Porn Raid Underscores Wi-Fi Privacy Risks

Tor can't (and doesn't) encrypt the packets between the exit node and the open internet though. If you're operating an exit node and someone requests an illicit webpage through you than it appears that you requested the webpage.

Tor admits as much on their website.

http://www.torproject.org/about/overview.html.en

Comment: Re:relative to what? (Score 2) 148

by Lanczos (#35783156) Attached to: Einstein Pedometer App Measures Relative Time Gain

The problem is that the article is a little bit wrong. In special relativity lets say I'm sitting next to someone and then I go for a walk and come back. When we compare clocks they will be the same since otherwise there would be symmetry breaking and we could establish a preferred inertial frame. Now in general relativity the symmetry is broken by the bending of time caused by my acceleration and when I return to my desk I will be younger than my stationary friend. i.e. this is all a consequence of general relativity not special.

Comment: Re:String theory comes to mind (Score 2) 962

by Lanczos (#35405462) Attached to: The Encroachment of Fact-Free Science

Out of mod points but this is exactly what I thought too. Every time I hear Brian Greene talk about the multiverse as if it were something other than an unobservable mathematical construct I want to jump out the window. By definition science can't make any claims to what happens outside the observable universe since those claims are unobservable. This is so tautological I always think it should go without saying but alas...

Comment: Re:It's not that bad at all... (Score 2, Insightful) 452

by Lanczos (#32561464) Attached to: The Truth About the Polygraph, According To the NSA

It is absolutely that bad. I took the test for a job at the NSA. I had nothing to hide. I am/was the most straightedge person on the planet.

I was strapped to the machine for 3.5 hours while they asked me the same 6 questions at least 8-12 times. Every time they told me that I was flunking the question regarding "falsifying information on my NSA security forms." I falsified nothing.
Once they detect a problem they shift from Mr. nice we'll have you in and out in five minutes guy to an actual interrogator. He left me alone in the room to sweat it out for 20 minutes. He kept going back to different things on my forms trying to catch me in a lie. He gave me all the lines about how he was just trying to help playing the ridiculous good cop/bad cop game with a guy who just wanted to do some interesting math not blow up the country.

I wasn't lying about anything by I was treated like a criminal. It was honestly one of the worst experiences of my life. I never found out if I passed or not as I ended up working at a DOE lab. If they had told me that I had to come back to try again I would have withdrawn my application. I wasn't lying the first time, why would the results be any different the second. And with the dogs sniffing in my car and the insane psych exam the whole culture seemed toxic and paranoid. I work at an NW lab now and IT has looser security than the NSA interview site has.

The machine does not work, end of story. And any propaganda video that tells you the polygraph is a painless procedure is a complete load of crap. A friend of mine later had a similar experience so I know it wasn't just me.

Comment: Re:How long will it last? (Score 1) 410

I'm not a geologist but I heard one on the news yesterday address this issue. He said that typically after a few days an erupting volcano runs out of solid matter to eject and just starts ejecting gas. So basically even if it keeps going forever it will be mostly just volcanic gas (which may or may not also have an effect, I don't know) and no more particulate matter. This guy didn't seem concerned about the year long eruption disrupting air space forever.

Round Numbers are always false. -- Samuel Johnson

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