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Comment: Ad hominem attacks & category errors (Score 0, Troll) 133

by LaissezFaire (#49663367) Attached to: FCC Tosses Petition Challenging Its New Internet Regulations

I didn't see a single pro-net neutrality comment that talked about The Fine Article. Lots, though, that stated anyone who opposes net neutrality is in the KKK, demonized the right wing, complained about corporate personhood, and complained that corporations have purchased the votes of Congress. The article talked about how a specific bureaucracy received a petition from those it now regulates, and told them "We thought about it and decided we're right. Go away." Normal discussions about the article would talk about strategy, "This seems like just a first step in the ongoing litigation so the corporations can say they tried to play nice," or the underlying legal aspects "wow, this administrative law thing is kinda cool, I hope we can pull more from the regular court system and get everything we like tried by the administrative branch and not the judicial branch, at least until Evil Republicans get the White House back."

You're embarrassing your own side. Please keep it up.

Comment: Re:Why is it even a discussion? (Score 1) 441

by LaissezFaire (#49475487) Attached to: Republicans Introduce a Bill To Overturn Net Neutrality

I understand the bumper sticker version of net neutrality says that every packet is equal under they eyes of the regulator, and will be treated exactly the same. VOIP 911 emergency calls must be treated exactly the same as pornography.

The second part of your paragraph doesn't make any sense. I certainly don't want to take private ownership of the Tubes and give it to the government. And certainly not to then lease out to companies to charge prices set by regulators for particular rates. One, you can't know the fair price unless you have a free market, which obviously isn't in place in your proposed scenario. Two, with government owning the infrastructure, we've then pretty much abandoned innovation. Sure, if smart techies got to write and implement the regulations and the infrastructure we might get there, but there's no way that happens in this scenario. Remember, we're talking about the current failure of the existing regulation not being good enough. What magic wand is going to make it better?

Comment: Re:Why is it even a discussion? (Score 1) 441

by LaissezFaire (#49468093) Attached to: Republicans Introduce a Bill To Overturn Net Neutrality

No, I think the FCC limited entry into the phone system to prevent "wasteful duplication" and "needless competition." (http://object.cato.org/sites/cato.org/files/serials/files/cato-journal/1994/11/cj14n2-6.pdf). These are the same arguments against Uber. The regulation system encouraged a monopoly, and then we got one. AT&T had the strength to enforce phone rentals because the government regulations encouraged regional monopolies. Perhaps not on purpose, but that's why the primary measure of a law or regulation is not the intent behind it, but its effects.

Comment: Re:Why is it even a discussion? (Score 0) 441

by LaissezFaire (#49467831) Attached to: Republicans Introduce a Bill To Overturn Net Neutrality

You said that a free market "does not truly exist," but the current situation "keeps screwing the customer more and more." So the only way to fix the current awful regulation is better regulators? Good luck with that. Remember, the very first time a net neutrality regulator gives preference over one piece of traffic over another, net neutrality regulation is broken. The regulations are then the exact opposite of what you want. How long do you think that will take to happen?

Comment: Re:Why is it even a discussion? (Score 0) 441

by LaissezFaire (#49467771) Attached to: Republicans Introduce a Bill To Overturn Net Neutrality

Why did you have to rent your phone? Because government regulations and laws enforced a monopoly. Your example is crappy regulation, not a free market system. Yes, after a few decades, the regulation got better. I wonder what we'd have had without those decades of awful regulation?

Comment: Re:Fox/henhouse (Score 1) 81

by LaissezFaire (#48728025) Attached to: FCC Says It Will Vote On Net Neutrality In February

Since there is no such thing in the U.S. as a national referendum on laws or regulations, do you have any other suggestions?

Since you asked, yes. A constitutional amendment ending corporate personhood and establishing that money is not speech.

Good. Let's wait to pass net neutrality after you ban corporations like the New York Times, and people aren't allowed to spend money to advance their opinions.

The thing that net neutrality advocates fail to do is to describe the regulatory system they want to put in place.

That's horseshit. We have a very nice regulatory model to put in place. It's called, "common carrier".

You're advocating a model like taxis where the regulators are overtly hostile to innovation, such as Lyft and Uber. Or if you want to go the utility route, where electric companies are forced to use a certain percentage of their electricity from favored producers such as wind farms and solar and rates are set by a centralized board. Maybe a slogan like "Net Neutrality, it'll be run just like the FAA!" would catch on.

Ah, the exceptions. Once VOIP 911 calls are mandated to be prioritized over other data, then you'll get medical data prioritized, which makes sense, because we don't want to kill people, and then ... the same big bad companies will lobby for their data, and net neutrality becomes the opposite of net neutrality. Whoops.

Good job inventing red herrings. "Net Neutrality is bad because bad people might do bad things in the future."

Free markets have utterly failed when it comes to infrastructure. Why should we trust it with something as important as communications?

We should trust free markets with infrastructure because they built the infrastructure we're using to discuss this. It's working pretty well. If you prefer a historical example, compare the great northern railroad with the first transcontinental railroad. The first was privately built and quite successful, the second received massive government subsidies, had shoddy construction, and was designed to scam the investors out of their money. As for red herrings, the phrase you're looking for is "regulatory capture," http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R.... If net neutrality comes into being, I can absolutely guarantee you Cisco, Comcast, and Google will be sending their armies (figuratively) to capture the agency.

Comment: Re:Fox/henhouse (Score 1) 81

by LaissezFaire (#48725139) Attached to: FCC Says It Will Vote On Net Neutrality In February

Since there is no such thing in the U.S. as a national referendum on laws or regulations

We can change that: http://www.gallup.com/poll/163...

And changing it requires amending the Constitution, either with the normal Congressional and state ratification process, or a Constitutional convention. I suspect what you really want is national referendums, and net neutrality is just the way you're bringing it up today, since you didn't respond to anything about net neutrality, or even propose a solution to making it law or regulation that has any chance in the near future.

Comment: Re:Fox/henhouse (Score 2, Insightful) 81

by LaissezFaire (#48724985) Attached to: FCC Says It Will Vote On Net Neutrality In February

Put it on the ballot as a national referendum in 2016, you wanna see Big Pipes shit themselves.

Since there is no such thing in the U.S. as a national referendum on laws or regulations, do you have any other suggestions?

The thing that net neutrality advocates fail to do is to describe the regulatory system they want to put in place. Take the comic from The Oatmeal, for example (http://theoatmeal.com/blog/net_neutrality). "And I'm going to do that by being a super terrific A+ dude and explaining to you exactly how Net Neutrality works." There are lots of panels describing the goal, and none showing the way it would work. How is it run? How are complaints logged? How are ISPs monitored? What reporting mechanisms to ISPs have? What features will be mandated or forbidden in network devices? How is good versus bad traffic shaping to be defined? What are the penalties? What are the exceptions?

Ah, the exceptions. Once VOIP 911 calls are mandated to be prioritized over other data, then you'll get medical data prioritized, which makes sense, because we don't want to kill people, and then ... the same big bad companies will lobby for their data, and net neutrality becomes the opposite of net neutrality. Whoops.

Comment: Category error (Score 1) 549

by LaissezFaire (#48140849) Attached to: Password Security: Why the Horse Battery Staple Is Not Correct
The XKCD comic is about what can be done right now; changing the password checking algorithms is a small cost in most places. The article is about the future -- how to change innumerable systems structurally to make a better password system. Heck, most systems today can't even do two-factor authentication, and the number that can do hardware authentication is smaller again. Even systems that can do software PKI is a tiny number.

The random-password tracking tools are great, and they work for a lot of people. But to be used universally, they have to work in 99% of cases, which they're unlikely to. Can you use your favorite one at a library computer? Without your laptop? In a place that forbids USB drives? Without Internet access? It's a similar problem set to why we aren't all using software PKI or GPG email. How do I get the dang keys around to where I am, securely? Here, it's how do I get my password list around to where I am, securely?

Comment: Re:Hasn't the contract been awarded? (Score 1) 139

by LaissezFaire (#48070825) Attached to: NASA Asks Boeing, SpaceX To Stop Work On Next-Gen Space Taxi
It's not the contract, it's the law. If the loser files the right kind of protest in the right amount of time, a stop work must be ordered. It's to avoid unscrupulous contracting officers from throwing a bid to their buddies. It's totally normal for US government contracting.

The biggest difference between time and space is that you can't reuse time. -- Merrick Furst

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