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Comment It makes sense to me (Score 2) 143

Its ease of use is second to none and that does matter. It also makes sense, sadly, that its plugin repo is now full of freemium. There's clearly a large market but I hope that the genuinely free and quality plugins will remain. Without them, this number wouldn't be.

Submission + - Aaron Swartz and MIT: The inside story (

An anonymous reader writes: The Boston Globe has reviewed over 7,000 pages of documents from Aaron Swartz's court case, shedding light on the activities that got in trouble and how MIT handled his case. Quoting: 'Most vividly, the e-mails underscore the dissonant instincts the university grappled with. There was the eagerness of some MIT employees to help investigators and prosecutors with the case, and then there was, by contrast, the glacial pace of the institution’s early reaction to the intruder’s provocation. MIT, for example, knew for 2½ months which campus building the downloader had operated out of before anyone searched it for him or his laptop — even as the university told JSTOR they had no way to identify the interloper.

And once Swartz was unmasked, the ambivalence continued. MIT never encouraged Swartz’s prosecution, and once told his prosecutor they had no interest in jail time. However, e-mails illustrate how MIT energetically assisted authorities in capturing him and gathering evidence — even prodding JSTOR to get answers for prosecutors more quickly — before a subpoena had been issued. ... But a number of JSTOR’s internal e-mails show a much angrier face in the months that Swartz eluded capture, with employees sharing frustration about MIT’s “rather tepid level of concern.” JSTOR officials repeatedly raised the prospect, among themselves, of going to the police, e-mails show.

Submission + - WSJ: Prepare to hang up the phone - forever ( 1

retroworks writes: Telecom giants AT&T and Verizon Communications are lobbying states, one by one, to hang up the plain, old telephone system, what the industry now calls POTS--the copper-wired landline phone system whose reliability and reach made the U.S. a communications powerhouse for more than 100 years. Is landline obsolete, and should be immune from grandparents era social protection?

Comment Re: Guaranteed... (Score 1) 51

It's been a painfully helpful thing, like an ice bath for a fever (maybe?) to See my beloved Android system (software and hardware) lose its aura that you can trust stuff because it's free and open source. I still prefer it to alternatives. But I confess that I was naive and went along with the worship of open source. I just don't think I control my phone anymore

Comment They should have lowered the price (Score 1) 276

I have been a prime member since the start and I would pay even more than that for it. However, I think they are making a mistake by thinking about cases like mine. The increase in cost of shipping is a terrible excuse. No doubt that the cost has gone up but I suspect the prime membership cannot even come close to breaking even. Those who do NOT sign up for it are the ones who are making that exact calculation. I did too at first because I used to shop for books and other stuff almost on most major sites. Once you have prime, you just keep using Amazon because of free and FAST shipping. Sure other sites have sometimes free shipping but the cheapest and slowest ones. Everyone who has prime in my experience buys more from Amazon. The more you buy the more they "lose" on shipping but they win in the end. I would have lowered it to get more people hooked...

Comment The ones I would love to ditch but can't (Score 1) 531

In order of importance for my work 1. Adobe Acrobat Pro (repeat the above line eight more times) 10. MS Word I can almost do all MS Word stuff with freeware alternatives, but almost. Acrobat alternatives? For pdf power users there is no alternative. None. I don't do graphics much but I can see that GIMP is no photoshop. It *seems* to me that Acrobat vs alternatives' gap is even bigger. But may just be because I don't do graphic works. MS Word

Comment "no one forced you to" (Score 1) 259

I see this perspective - 'no one forced you to publish with them' etc - voiced in some comments here. I appreciate that many of us need such fantasies of individual sovereignty to even get out of bed in the morning, this doesn't apply to academia. Most people have no choice practically of where the top journals in their fields are. They could theoretically publish elsewhere, only not to be read the very few peers there are to begin with, or lose a chance at tenure, placement, etc.

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