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Submission + - BBC blocks UK residents (

An anonymous reader writes: Ok, this takes the p*ss.

As a UK resident who has been funding the BBC for many years I was shocked to receive the following message when trying to access a page on their website:

"We're sorry but this site is not accessible from the UK as it is part of our international service and is not funded by the licence fee. It is run commercially by BBC Worldwide, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the BBC, the profits made from it go back to BBC programme-makers to help fund great new BBC programmes. You can find out more about BBC Worldwide and its digital activities at"

The Beeb should be reminded that there would be no BBC International were if it were not for the licence fee.

Totally disgusted....


Submission + - Reuters Was Hacked Via An Old Version Of WordPress

An anonymous reader writes: The Reuters blogging platform was hacked on Friday, and a false story about an alleged interview with a Syrian rebel leader was posted. On Sunday, Reuters suffered a second security breach in which hackers gained control of one of its Twitter accounts. While Twitter hasn't commented on the latter, we have more information on the former: Reuters forgot to keep its WordPress installation updated.

Submission + - Cisco cuts 1,300 jobs in "limited restructuring" (

alphadogg writes: Cisco is cutting 2% of its global workforce, or about 1,300 employees, in a “limited restructuring,” the company said today.
“We routinely review our business to determine where we need to align investment based on growth opportunities,” wrote Cisco spokesperson Karen Tillman in an e-mailed statement. “Additionally, we continue to evaluate our organizational structure as part of our plan to drive simplicity, speed of decisions and agility across Cisco." Cisco last July said it was cutting 6,500 jobs, or 9% of its workforce, in an effort to better focus its business and reduce operating expenses by $1 billion a year.


Submission + - Objective-C Overtakes C++ but C is Number One! (

mikejuk writes: Although the TIOBE Index has its shortcomings, the finding that Objective-C has overtaken C++ is reiterated in the open source Transparent Language Popularity Index. The reason is, of course, that Objective-C is the language you have to use to create iOS applications and as iPads and iPhones have risen in popularity so has Objective-C.
If you look at the raw charts then you can see that C++ has been in decline since about 2005 and Objective-C has shot up to overtake it with amazing growth. But the two charts are on different scales — if you plot both on the same chart you can see that rather than rocketing up Objective-C has just crawled its way passed and it is as much to do with the decline of C++. It simply hasn't reached the popularity of C++ in its heydays before 2005.
However the real story is that C, a raw machine independent assembler like language, with no pretense to be object oriented or sophisticated has beaten all three of the object oriented heavy weights — Java, C++ and Objective C.
Yes C is number one (and a close second in the transparent index).
Now this is something to think about...


Submission + - Developers hate the App Store. Should we care? (

jfruhlinger writes: "The simmering resentment developers have been feeling over the past few months over the inadequacies of the iPhone App Store — the opacity and arbitrariness of Apple's decision making, the economics that have turned it into a dollar store full of fart apps — has boiled over in the controversy over the rejection of Google Voice apps. The developers may be right in that the system is rigged so that it's impossible to make a living off of writing iPhone apps. The question is, can they make anyone else care?"

Submission + - Canada to join the surveilance state club

earthforce_1 writes: "Under a newly proposed bill, police will be given new powers to eavesdrop on Internet based communication. All ISPs will be forced to "upgrade" their systems to allow law enforcement to tap in, and obtain information about users and their digital conversations, under the proposed legislation, with the usual excuses. "Terrorist groups, pornographers and pedophile networks, illegal traffickers in weapons, drugs and human beings, money launderers and cyber criminals, Internet and telemarketing fraudsters all use technology to develop activities, perpetrate crimes and avoid detection," the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police said in a November 2008 position paper supporting a new law. Federal Privacy Commissioner Jennifer Stoddard recently warned that forcing ISPs to surrender information "is a serious step forward toward mass surveillance" that violates the rights of Canadians."

The two most common things in the Universe are hydrogen and stupidity. -- Harlan Ellison