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Businesses

Why Certifications Are Necessary (Even If Aggravating To Earn) 213

Nerval's Lobster writes: Whether or not certifications have value is a back-and-forth argument that's been going on since before Novell launched its CNE program in the 1990s. Developer David Bolton recently incited some discussion of his own when he wrote an article for Dice in which he claimed that certifications aren't worth the time and money. But there's a lot of evidence that certifications can add as much as 16 percent to a tech professional's base pay; in addition a lot of tech companies use resume-screening software that weeds out any resumes that don't feature certain acronyms. There's also the argument that the cost, difficulty, and annoyance of earning a certification is actually the best reason to go through it, especially if you're looking for a job; it broadcasts that you're serious enough about the technology to invest a serious chunk of your life in it. But others might not agree with that assessment, arguing that all a certification proves is that you're good at taking tests, not necessarily knowing a technology inside and out.
Power

Your Body, the Battery: Powering Gadgets From Human "Biofuel" 67

An anonymous reader writes: This article takes a look at the future of electronic devices powered by the human body. From the electric voltage in mammal ears called the endocochlear potential, to body heat, and muscle motion, there are a number of exciting new areas of energy research being explored. Ars reports: "Staying alive guzzles energy. In order to keep us ticking, our bodies need to burn between 2,000 and 2,500 calories per day, which is conveniently enough to power a modestly used smart phone. So if just a fraction of that energy could be siphoned, our bodies could in theory be used to run any number of electronic devices, from medical implants to electronic contact lenses—all without a battery in sight. Recently, researchers have taken important strides toward unlocking this electric potential."

Comment Affect to existing accounts? (Score 1) 205

So I'm still grandfathered in on one of these AT&T "Unlimited" accounts, should I expect to not be limited any longer? It is still very obvious every month when I hit the soft cap whatever it is, then after that things load fairly slow, which I've grown used to over the years. None of this arbitration really seems to focus on the present, but rather the past.
Python

How Much Python Do You Need To Know To Be Useful? 263

Nerval's Lobster writes: Since Python is a general-purpose language, it finds its way into a whole lot of different uses and industries. That means the industry in which you work has a way of determining what you actually need to know in terms of the language, as developer Jeff Cogswell explains in a new Dice piece. For example, if you're hired to write apps that interact with operating systems and monitor devices, you might not need to know how to use the Python modules for scientific and numerical programming. In a similar fashion, if you're hired to write Python code that interacts with a MySQL database, then you won't need to master how it works with CouchDB. The question is, how much do you need to know about Python's basics? Cogswell suggests there are three basic levels to learning Python: Learn the core language itself, such as the syntax and basic types (and the difference between Python 2 and Python 3); learn the commonly used modules, and familiarize yourself with other modules; learn the bigger picture of software development with Python, such as including Python in a build process, using the pip package manager, and so on. But is that enough?

Comment "Just annouced" eh? (Score 2) 72

I suppose one could interpret a press release from January 7th as "Samsung has just announced its new", it was announced during CES on January 7th, here's the press release: http://www.samsung.com/global/... Linked article says model numbers haven't been released either.. here you go: 128GB NVME SSD SM951 - MZVPV128HDGL-00000 256GB NVME SSD SM951 - MZHPV256HDGL-00000 512GB NVME SSD SM951 - MZHPV512HDGL-00000 They've been shipping these in Lenovo and Apple laptops, they are scarce, but available (Amazon, RamCity, Ebay, Etc) at a little more than $1 per GB.

Comment Constantly evolving (Score 1) 391

I believe the oldest part in my current PC is my PSU, its survived seven years and after having it reconditioned and the leads updated this year I suspect it will last a good while longer. The newest piece would be my case, I kickstarted the red harbinger cross desk and am loving it! It will take quite a while to piece together all the parts needed to fully realize its potential but that's the fun.
Bug

Bug Bounties Don't Help If Bugs Never Run Out 235

Bennett Haselton writes: "I was an early advocate of companies offering cash prizes to researchers who found security holes in their products, so that the vulnerabilities can be fixed before the bad guys exploited them. I still believe that prize programs can make a product safer under certain conditions. But I had naively overlooked that under an alternate set of assumptions, you might find that not only do cash prizes not make the product any safer, but that nothing makes the product any safer — you might as well not bother fixing certain security holes at all, whether they were found through a prize program or not." Read on for the rest of Bennett's thoughts.

Comment Where's the story? (Score 4, Insightful) 152

So we have a link to a story about Company A who has exclusive license to use BigShot school's patents to make a fancy wheel and at the end of the article the reporter asks Company A whats they think about Company B's simliar product. The CEO says "Company B CEO came by 18 months ago wanted to co-lab, hung out and left, but I haven't looked at his patents" and we're slashdotting "impending legal doom", yet neither side has said boo to that nature or is there any other relevant link to anything remotely newsworthy. Where's the story?

Comment Re:When you have a bad driver ... (Score 1) 961

The only thing obvious to me is your lack of information and community's need to use Roger as the scapegoat for Paul's death (hence the +4 Insightful for the idiot comment)

The short story here is that Roger was going out to shakedown the car that was at his shop being worked on for stalling issues when Paul (who was visiting for a charity event) jumped in the car they were for about a 20 minute drive. That is not to say they did not speed or were not reckless, but lets be honest here, you don't shakedown a ~350,000 supercar like a F150 do you? There's evidence of some mechanical failure but nothing that has been officially announced, just what is being discussed close to those involved.

Anyways, there is risk in everything and driving exotic cars is probably on the higher end of the spectrum and both of these fine gentlemen were well aware of those risks and embraced them.

Comment Re:Lol (Score 1) 212

Indeed. IBM's reputation is pretty well established. They are slow, tedious and yet effective. They are a glacier in IT. But I see it everywhere -- people making decisions in an IT project that have know knowledge of what it takes to make things happen. The illusion that "it's all so easy" has really gotten buried too deep in someone's head somewhere.

The magic phrase is "All You Have To Do Is..."

Those six words have destroyed more IT projects than anyone can count.

My favorite requirement is: "Works as designed"

Live within your income, even if you have to borrow to do so. -- Josh Billings

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