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Comment: Re:Growing pains. (Score 0, Flamebait) 159

A lot of people who complain about government are people who would like to terminate most, if not all, labor protections. They bury that desire in ideological ruminations, and have convinced vast legions of rubes that the only good government is a non existent government, and somehow the magic of market forces will protect workers.

Comment: Re:No difference (Score 0) 101

by MightyMartian (#47715819) Attached to: Do Readers Absorb Less On Kindles Than On Paper? Not Necessarily

I agree completely. When I first started using an dreaded (an old LG keyboard phone with a JavaME spun reader I had hacked on to it) I found reading a bit of a chore. It took me a few days to get really comfortable with the seemingly small and yet ultimately pricing differences. Now I regularly read books on my smartphone and tablet without a hitch, and have noticed no recall problems.

Comment: Re:Ubiquitous Common Denominator (Score 3, Interesting) 235

by MightyMartian (#47684975) Attached to: Email Is Not Going Anywhere

There is still some faxing going on at our office, but the ubiquitousness of easy-to-use scanners means more and more of the documents that we used faxes for are just being sent via email. We won a contract a few years ago and literally had the hundred page document faxed to us, and then we signed and witnessed the back sheet and sent it back via fax. The last amendment was done via email. When even the lawyers are walking away from fax machines, it is definitely a technology on the wane.

Comment: Re:Reduced rights (Score 1) 166

by MightyMartian (#47681319) Attached to: Watch a Cat Video, Get Hacked: the Death of Clear-Text

Well, there have been a whole host of attacks associated with vulnerable versions of Flash and Java that could at least cripple a profile. I ran up against one of them around 2010. One of the staff at one of our remote locations suddenly had all their files supposedly disappear, desktop wiped out and the like, and a notification about a ransom if they wanted the files back. The user had no admin privileges, so I checked, and sure enough, the other profiles were untouched. What had happened is the auto updater for the workstation had failed.

Now, while it's true that the operating system itself was not compromised, and no other systems or users on the network were compromised, certainly there was enough control to potentially view confidential data on shared drives. While this was relatively unsophisticated ransomware, it did teach me than merely obsessing about privilege escalation does not lead to a secure system. User profiles and directories can still potentially be vulnerable even if the malware can't root the system.

Comment: Re:I'm interested in this sort of thing for my hou (Score 1) 107

by rthille (#47680839) Attached to: Samsung Buys Kickstarter-Funded Internet of Things Startup For $200MM

We have two big dogs, and I'm not really worried about a break-in, but I still don't feel comfortable ceding my coming and going to a for-profit company with unknown security practices.

If I were really worried about a real break in, I wouldn't have had the alarm system ripped out during the remodel...

Comment: I'm interested in this sort of thing for my house (Score 4, Informative) 107

by rthille (#47678457) Attached to: Samsung Buys Kickstarter-Funded Internet of Things Startup For $200MM

But I'm sure as hell not going to run my door locks over wireless with some consumer product that's produced as cheaply as can be for the mass market.

On the other hand, I know that roll-it-yourself security is almost always broken.

So, I deal with having to reach into my pocket to get my keys, and turn on lights with a switch rather than automatically.

Somehow I survive.

"Well, social relevance is a schtick, like mysteries, social relevance, science fiction..." -- Art Spiegelman

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