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Comment: Re:Ah the Germans, they're really bad at this! (Score 3, Insightful) 176

by Kohlrabi82 (#46243943) Attached to: Germany's Renewable Plan Faces Popular Resistance

I don't know where you got your numbers, but here's what is on Wikipedia for CO2 And GWh generated. Let's at least compare the same year for each country.

  • US: CO2 6,750,000 / 4,256,100 GWh=1.59 tons of CO2 per GWh
  • Germany: CO2-810,000 / 617,600 GWh=1.31 tons of CO2 per GWh

It's certainly better than the US, but considering this big push the Germany is in for clean energy and the US is only half-ass moving in that direction, I'm a little surprised it is as close as it is.

This is because Germany now uses coal power plants instead of nuclear plants to produce the necessary electricity.

France is on the better side of this by far at: CO2-370,000 / 560,500 GWh=0.66 tons of CO2 per GWh

How surprising, nuclear energy is green energy.

+ - The Streisand Effect: A Florida journalist's smear and censor campaign backfires-> 2

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "A tragic death, freedom of speech, libel, defamation, legal threats, unethical journalism, reddit's /r/bicycling, and The Streisand effect. A South Florida "journalist" is called out for running a smear story, doubles down on his position, publicly attacks commenters and reddit, and threatens legal action when a disturbing conflict of interest is exposed."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Not a missing metric, it's bad engineering (Score 1) 251

by Kohlrabi82 (#40450737) Attached to: Quiet Victories Won In the Loudness Wars

The problem is not that we are missing some metric to calculate the loudness, that is pretty easy to define, and has been used to develop counteracting measures in ReplayGain and EBU R128 compliant loudness scanners.

The problem is that the production of music is so atrocious, most of popular and metal music is compressed into such a tiny dynamic range. Some is even clipped to digital fullscale, leading to horrible artifacts when listening. This is nothing which can be fixed by a law, it is simply (deliberate?!) bad engineering. As long as this keeps up the loudness war will not end.

From the last few pop(?) albums I listened to (Red Hot Chili Peppers, The Mars Volta), it seems that we, the listeners, are still losing big time.

Comment: Re:Why pirate network TV? (Score 5, Interesting) 312

by Kohlrabi82 (#40262883) Attached to: Game of Thrones The Most Pirated TV Show of the Season

I will explain the situation for Germany:

First of all, real popular shows you read about on the net normally haven't arrived on German networks, yet. Most of the time they arrive with at least one season lag, if at all. And even if you can watch the show by then, it is normally on networks which will drown you in ads every few minutes.

And don't get me started that not even today, with the full digitization of TV, you have the option to watch foreign shows undubbed in Germany. If you ever had to suffer through the German dubs of TV shows, you would no doubt also strongly consider piracy.

Of course you can wait for the DVD/BD box to arrive, containing an English audio track, but those may again arrive late or not at all. Coincidentally, GoT has been an exception here. Also, the pricing is oftentimes on the ludicrous side, and thanks to DVD and BD DRM you cannot even just get the US release.

Comment: Re:Social Justice (Score 2) 188

by Kohlrabi82 (#39482037) Attached to: German Pirate Party Enters 2nd State Parliament

This adds to my impression that many, many voters just voted for them because they are fed up with the old parties and system. It may very well be that these voters will leave for greener pastures in the future, causing the PP to fall below 5% again (meaning they won't get seats in state elections). Also, a good percentage of the voters are previous FDP (liberals) voters. The FDP had two positions in the past, neo-liberalism with open markets and freedom for the financial sector, and civil rights. They nearly completely expunged the latter from their party over the years (apart from the national minister Leutheusser-Schnarrenberger), and now they are paying for it: They are part of the national government, but didn't even get 2% of the votes in the Saarland. Most analysts assume that the voters left for the other bigger parties and the PP.

Comment: Two likely causes (Score 1) 311

by Kohlrabi82 (#39424537) Attached to: The Numbers Behind the Copyright Math

Dwindling sales of the RIAA labels could have two probable causes:

1. With Spotify and similar streaming services, most people can get all the music they need for 5$ a month. The offers there probably satisfy most users.

2. The CDs that get released by major labels are produced so poorly that I entirely stopped buying any major label releases (also because my taste evolved). It's completely retarded marketing on the majors end. The people buying CDs today are actually not the young people, but rather in their late twenties and thirties. Those actually know how properly mastered music sounds, and current CD releases are far from that. It's totally schizophrenic to still put out CDs, but to treat your own product in such a poor fashion that it's simply worthless.

Comment: Ian's remark about 128kbit/s MP3s (Score 3, Informative) 382

Ian Shepherd's mentioning that one should avoid 128kbit/s encoded MP3. This is leaving out a critical piece of information. Luckily he mentioned himself that heavily (audio) compressed music (data) compresses very badly. This will be especially evident if you force the encoder to only allocate a fixed number of bits to a section, called "Constant Bitrate" (CBR) in MP3 encoders. "Busy" sections will get the same data allotment as quiet sections. This problem can be diminished by using "Variable Bitrate" (VBR) mode when encoding, which encodes to a specific target quality rather than file size. With that, (LAME) MP3s can still sound good enough around 128kbit/s, since the encoder is free to allocate more bits to critical sections and less bits to non-critical section.

In short, there is no reason to use CBR encoding, unless your target device is unable to decode VBR encoded files, or you absolutely need to know the exact bandwidth requirement of a stream. It defeats the whole point of lossy encoding, which is to reproduce the original with highest possible fidelity, not reach a target file size.

Comment: Money = Sexy (Score 5, Insightful) 378

by Kohlrabi82 (#38083496) Attached to: Has Apple Made Programmers Cool?
I get it, when you sit in your basement hacking away at code potentially benefiting many people for free you are a socially unacceptable geek. As soon as you put together some graphics and make money from thousands of people you are the sex icon of the new computer era. It's not that perception has changed, but rather the contrary. Money and status derived from money is valued more than the work itself.

Comment: Re:What are ALAC's technical merits? (Score 2) 526

by Kohlrabi82 (#37866984) Attached to: Apple's Lossless Audio Codec (ALAC) Now Open Source
Though the ALAC decoder in rockbox is probably not perfect, the codec performance comparison at http://www.rockbox.org/wiki/CodecPerformanceComparison clearly shows that decoding of FLAC is far more efficient in rockbox. Maybe ALAC decoding can close the gap now that ALAC sources are open.

There's got to be more to life than compile-and-go.

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