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Comment: Never had more fun in an FPS than HL2 on the Rift (Score 2) 154

While I know some people are very suspetible to gettin simsick, I just want to add that some arent. I have used a Rift DK1 to play Half-Life 2, and it is the best FPS experience I have ever had. It adds an unbeliable amount of spacial sense and experience. I would not play it again without the Rift.

That said, I do need to take breaks every 45 minutes or so, and cannot play for more than three hours or so. Still, its absolutely worth it.

Comment: Re:36% less pain (Score 1) 274

by Knutsi (#46878653) Attached to: Male Scent Molecules May Be Compromising Biomedical Research

I feel people are pretty good at this. In a clinical setting, we ask people to rate their paint between 0 and 10, 10 being the worst pain imaginable. Another way is to use a visual analog scale.

At least, people appear to be aware of degrees of pain, but only relatively. It does differ with personality and previous experience. So, it might be better to use for tracking perception of change in a condition than actual pain measured.

If mice actually feel less pain or not sounds very hard to tell. It might just be that they ignore it more in light of other things, like the hunter who just entered the room (funny that, why would a male human give this effect, when I'm pretty sure most of the mice's natural predators are just as dangerous if they are female..).

Comment: Lets wait and see (Score 1) 535

by Knutsi (#46578553) Attached to: Facebook Buying Oculus VR For $2 Billion

Allot of negative comments here. I see how this can go bad too. Oculus seemed hellbent on providing great consumer level VR. That is what they do, and it's the *only* thing they do. That is why they would make a great platform. When large companies come in, they have larger strategies into which to fit everything. They do *many* things, and ends up doing many of them worse for that single reason. Big choices gets affected by strategy for other things, and the quality gets watered down.

Then again, Facebook has not broke Instagram? Perhaps it is just natural that they expand, and I agree with them very much that VR presence goes way beyond gaming. I'm in healthcare, and this is where I see it's potential besides gaming. This is why I got DK1 and have DK2 on the way. As long as Facebook does not destroy the platform, but rather adds to it's expanse, it will all be well.

Oh, and it might help with the fight agains Sony looming on the horizon.

+ - Oculus VR releases second devkit

Submitted by Knutsi
Knutsi (959723) writes "Oculus VR has just announced the second version of the virtual reality devkit that came out of their wildly popular Kickstarter campaign. "The second development kit features many of the key technical breakthroughs and core elements of the consumer Rift including a low-persistence, high-definition display and precise, low-latency positional head tracking". The kit is available for pre-order right now, and ships in July."

Comment: Re:Windows 8.x is un-usable without Start8 (Score 1) 200

by Knutsi (#46490613) Attached to: Mozilla Scraps Firefox For Windows 8, Citing Low Adoption of Metro

I have dropped someone who has never used that classic shell into it. In fact, he has never really used a computer before. It's unbelieveably confusing for him. His laptop is Windows 8.1. It does not have touch screen. So, I cannot teach him the new Explorer, because he cannot swipe from the sides, and the mouse does different things depending on where he right-clicks. I added explorer to the taskbar in Deskop, and told him to use that. But then, there is no visible way to restart the computer og shut it down. While some of the metro apps (like Mail) would be good for him, they too are hard to use without swipes. Mixing the metro space with the desktop space is also terribly confusing.

The man is somewhat old, and new to computers, but he gets lost so fast on Windows 8 it's scary. I gave him an iPad, and he surfed. I can adapt, most users find that hard. If you are to push someone to adapt thus, it should be for great gain. I think the metro-desktop combination gives no such gain at present, and just serves to pull the otherwise excellent Windows 8 down. If they did not catch this is user testing, that is beyond my comprehention.

As good as metro is on tablets, it serves no real purpose on desktops and laptops other than a way to spread it, IMHO. So MS is sacrificing it's usability to gain a foothold in the tablet space. THAT appears to be working, but it made my friend struggle greatly with his first computer.

Comment: Re:Javascript! (Score 1) 387

by Knutsi (#46034861) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: It's 2014 -- Which New Technologies Should I Learn?

Think there might be something to this. I feel .js is showing up everywhere these days. I've not really worked as programmer for some years, but now that I ended up doing some coding again, I settled on TypeScript (which transpiles to JavaScript) for a both client and server, with loads of shared code between the two. It's a very interesting fusion of things, and the strong typing and tooling that TypeScript adds to Javascript really fixed some of my complaints about .js. If you are curious, check it out. Also, WebStorm IDE has excellent tool support.

Comment: It's the reasons I got my retina Macbook (Score 2) 333

by Knutsi (#45766053) Attached to: Rise of the Super-High-Res Notebook Display

I recently bought a new laptop to replace my old Windows laptop. I ended up getting Macbook precisely because of the extraordinary quality of the retina screen.

I do allot of reading, writing and some coding on my laptop, and the change has been extremely pleasing. For the same price, I could have gotten a marginally more powerful machine with more memory and disk space and touch screen, but all things considered, the high-def "retina" screen *completely* trumped that for me. High-def screens is one of those things I think you need to experience yourself. My girlfriend has a lower resolution screen, and I find it hard not to get annoyed at pixels when I use it, and everything seems blurred. I find reading much easier on the eyes on the new machine than others. To me that means its not just a luxury thing - it really makes a difference.

So, I for one welcome our new high resolution overlords with open arms. The very argument "X should be enough for everyone, no need to progress" was invalidated a long time ago anyway. Screen tech is obviously evolving in synergistic ways between laptops, phones and tablets, and as long as they can make them better, please do.

Comment: Re:VR (Score 1) 414

by Knutsi (#44448525) Attached to: Are We At the Limit of Screen Resolution Improvements?

I was about to say the same. I own a development kit, and the pixels are really visible at today's 720p in a 7 inch panel. People call this the "screen-door effect as the space between the pixels resembles the wires in a screen door). For this tech to be as crisp as we all would like, what you suggest sounds about right. Even though they are showing off the HD prototype (1080p), they are very careful not to say the problem is gone with that model. And even if the pixels dissipated, it's in VR that you really want to seek out that retina resolution (:

I have no doubt VR-devices will drive not just screen tech, but also 3D-graphics in the years to come, and take over as the pushing force that mobiles provide today. (The 3D has to improve since the level of detail you desire is much higher with the Rift than on a flat panel - you get closer, see more - also it must run at a higher resolution eventually).

I feel that consumer VR is becoming a reality because of cellphone evolution, but future cellphones (whatever form they might take - AR, anyone?) will be a reality because of VR evolution.

Comment: Can't files be cracked, like passwords? (Score 1) 69

by Knutsi (#44315001) Attached to: BitTorrent Sync Beta Released

So this thing stores segments of your synced stuff in a distributed fashion across multiple unknowns computers. right? I've been following a recent article series on Arstechnica about cracking passwords, and that left me worried. Now, what is to stop anyone participating in my sync from forcefully cracking and viewing encrypted parts of my files?

Comment: Me lacking fear does not make this right (Score 4, Insightful) 404

It seem too me that the capacities of surveillance tech has evolved much faster than public understanding and emotion on the issue. As a non-US citizen, I am disgusted by the idea of my emails or metadata derived from them are massively stored away if they pass through the US, or even my own country. I understand and respect that some level of this must exist in modern society, but we need to have checks and balances that can be vetted by he public.

And can it not be wrong, even though I have nothing to fear? Have I nothing to fear from this system even if I am not a criminal?

Ethically, it is limiting to my freedom that there exists a stash of information somewhere that might be abused when taken out of context. Does that not limit my freedom to express radical opinion in private discussions, or even do so satirically? Can I no long play with unpopular ideas using electronic communications? Can I no longer listen to the voice of my opponent without fear of at some point being labeled one of them?

Legally, how can it be that an email is less of my property than a letter I store in a deposit box in my bank, or send in the mail? Is it not mine or the recipients only? If the state had an army of people standing by to make copies of every letter sent, the situation would be perfectly analogous. Is that not ransacking me, or confiscating my property only to provide me a copy?

Safety wise, if a record of my life is aggregated in a single source that I have no knowledge of, how can I know that it is truly safe? How can I ensure politicians spend enough on it's safety? I keep my IDs safe to prevent identity theft. What happens the day my life is stolen, but the theft is classified?

And last but not least, what happens to the balance of power between a state and its people here? The state is the servant of the people, and it should always respect that. When the people become submissive to the state, nothing good happens. We've spend much blood in the past to put it where it belongs, but it always threatens to slip back. We need people like Edward Snowden to blow the whistle when that happens. The very fact that he is now in hiding shows how the power-balance has it's centre of gravity atm.

Comment: Have we lost control? (Score 2) 257

by Knutsi (#41271749) Attached to: For Android Users, 2012 Is Still the Year of Gingerbread

Perhaps the fact that we cannot ourselves (easily) update our tablets and phones says something about how much control we've lost on our devices? That scares me. If i buy one of the new style of laptop-tablet hybrid, can I expect the same? Will this not easily cut years of value off these things, and slow down the software ecosystem?

I had an _expensive_ Window Phone. Then Microsoft told me I could not upgrade my 6 months old phone to WP8. I felt so cheated, and still do. I will never buy another. It is such a disrespect for the customer.

Comment: A single factor does not a guideline make.. (Score 1) 234

by Knutsi (#40038357) Attached to: NIH Study Finds That Coffee Drinkers Have Lower Risk of Death

I guess the most interesting point in this article is what is written towards the top: "we believe these results do provide some reassurance that coffee drinking does not adversely affect health.". If it was poison, this study would show. I remember learning about cafestol at some point (by a researcher), and how recommendations should be given to make sure to only drink filtered coffee. It's, according to our teacher, the most "cholesterologenic" substance know. So I guess a single factor does not a guideline make.

On a funny personal note, this news came exactly on the day I decided to cut down my own consumption :p

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