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+ - Flame used MS certificates intended for TS licensing->

Submitted by
yuhong
yuhong writes "From the article:
"What we found is that certificates issued by our Terminal Services licensing certification authority, which are intended to only be used for license server verification, could also be used to sign code as Microsoft. Specifically, when an enterprise customer requests a Terminal Services activation license, the certificate issued by Microsoft in response to the request allows code signing without accessing Microsoft’s internal PKI infrastructure."
Microsoft released an update adding the affected CAs to the Untrusted Certificate Store."

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Networking

+ - IEEE vet: Carriers capping LTE services to avoid fixed-line cannibalization->

Submitted by alphadogg
alphadogg (971356) writes "Roberto Saracco isn't buying carriers' claims that they need to put data caps on their LTE services due to excessive traffic causing massive engineering challenges. Saracco, a senior member of the IEEE and the director of the Telecom Italia Future Centre, said during an interview Tuesday that the major reason carriers are placing data caps on their LTE services is to prevent users from going exclusively with wireless data services and ditching their landline connections. "You're always going to want to make the maximum amount of value," he said. "And you don't want to have your fixed-line network being cannibalized by mobile.""
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Databases

+ - Oracle Issues Massive Security Update for 88 Vulnerabilities->

Submitted by wiredmikey
wiredmikey (1824622) writes "Oracle issued a massive update today to patch 88 security vulnerabilities, including dozens of remote code execution issues that can be exploited without user authentication.

The largest number of fixes was for Oracle’s Financial Services Software, with a total of 17 patches. The Oracle Sun products suite contains 15 patches, including five that are remotely exploitable without authentication. Among the Sun products, the most serious of the bugs is a vulnerability in the Oracle Grid Engine that scored a 9.0 out of a possible in 10 on the CVSS 2.0 scoring system. The most critical bug overall belonged to JRockit, Oracle’s proprietary Java Virtual Machine, which scored a 10 on the CVSS scale.

No Java update is on the menu in this release, as Oracle releases those updates on a separate schedule. Java vulnerabilities have been in the news lately due to well publicized attack campaigns such as the resurgence of the Mac OS X Flashback Trojan. The vulnerability targeted in that attack was closed by Oracle in February."

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Education

+ - Teachers Think White Females Lag in Math-> 2

Submitted by ancarett
ancarett (221103) writes "Researchers from the University of Texas at Austin found that American high school math teachers tend to rate white female students’ math abilities lower than those of their white male peers, even when their grades and test scores are comparable. Their research drew from the Education Longitudional Study (2002) with data on about 15,000 students and their teachers. According to the researchers "teachers hold the belief that math is just easier for white males than it is for white females." Their findings appear in the April 2012 issue of Gender & Society."
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Programming

+ - Light Table - a new IDE concept->

Submitted by omar.sahal
omar.sahal (687649) writes "Bret Victor (covered previously on slashdot) demoed the idea of instant feedback on your code. Victor's concept runs a little like a interpretor on your code, but in realtime. This allows the programer to instantly see what his programe is doing. Chris Granger has turned this novel idea into Light Table — a new IDE designed to make use of the Victor's insights.

Bret Victor — Inventing on Principle — https://vimeo.com/36579366
Update on the project — http://www.chris-granger.com/2012/04/15/light-tables-numbers/"

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Google

+ - Oracle and Google to Finally Enter Courtroom->

Submitted by
Fluffeh
Fluffeh writes "After around 900 motions and filings, not to mention a timeline of two years, Google and Oracle are finally putting their case before a jury which will be selected on Monday. While Oracle originally sued for billions, the possible damages have come down to a more reasonable US$30-something million (the details vary depending on if you ask Google or Oracle). However, the sides are still far apart. Oracle's proposal was a minimum, not a maximum, and Oracle has asked for a tripling of damages because of the "willful and deliberate nature of Google's infringement." For ongoing royalties from future sales, Google has proposed payment of just over one-half of one percent of revenue if patent infringement is proven, but Oracle wants more. Beyond financial damages, Oracle has asked for a permanent order preventing Google from continuing to infringe the patents and copyrights. The case is planned to start on Monday afternoon, after jury selection or Tuesday at the latest."
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Security

+ - Google: loads of new bugs->

Submitted by
Mikeprg
Mikeprg writes "In services and products of Google on Monday, September, 24th, 2007, three vulnerabilities allowed the malefactor to execute an any code written in language JavaScript on behalf of a site and to steal requisites of registration record, kept in cookies have been found out, and in one case — to steal photos from online-storehouse. Vulnerability to between-sites scripting (CSS/XSS) have been found out in Google Groups, the search machine and Picasa."
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Hardware Hacking

DIY Biochemical Scanner From a Hacked CD Drive 70

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the bargain-health-care dept.
holy_calamity writes "Turns out hacking two extra light sensors into a CD drive can turn it into a lab scanner to read the results of high-accuracy immunoassays used to detect disease markers or pathogens, New Scientist reports. The drive proved able to detect pesticides at concentrations as low as 0.02 micrograms per liter."

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