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Comment: Disruptive Technologies (Score 1) 717

by Kiralan (#43646669) Attached to: The First Fully 3D-Printed Gun Has Been Successfully Test-Fired
Guns may be the hot button, but it got the conversation started. These printers have been around for a while. The bigger picture is that anyone can get and use a 3-d printer, cost permitting (which will drop eventually), and 'print' pretty much anything that can be made from these types of plastics. In the future, will the 'copyright/trademark police' come after you for printing copies for profit, rather than pay the manufacturers prices, or 'making available' the files to do so?
Media

Roku Finally Gets a 2D Menu System 80

Posted by samzenpus
from the new-look dept.
DeviceGuru writes "Many of us have griped for years about Roku's retro one-dimensional user interface. Finally, in conjunction with the release of the new Roku 3 model, the Linux-based media streaming player is getting a two-dimensional facelift, making it quicker and easier to access favorite channels and find new ones. Current Roku users, who will now begin suffering from UI-envy, will be glad to learn that Roku plans to push out a firmware update next month to many earlier models, including the Roku LT, Roku HD (model 2500R), Roku 2 HD, Roku 2 XD, Roku 2 XS, and Roku Streaming Stick. A short demo of the new 2D Roku menu system is available in this YouTube video."

Comment: Re:There are sockets for this package style (Score 1) 1009

by Kiralan (#42098945) Attached to: Is Intel Planning To Kill Enthusiast PCs?
Let us hope that they have better QC and design than was used on the X-Box 360. If I recall, the key reason for the RROD (Red Ring of Death) was fractures in the Ball-Grid array soldering due to board flexing, which will occur when memory, PCI cards, cables, etc. are installed or removed.

Comment: Re:Kill XP? (Score 1) 405

by Kiralan (#41387737) Attached to: Maybe With Help From Google and Adobe, Microsoft Can Kill Windows XP
We have many older applications on our systems, that either are not compatible with Win7, even in 'compatibility mode', or would require re-activation with the vendor, which would require either new licenses (send money, please), or is not possible due to the licensing servers no longer being available (Vendor stopped supporting the app). There are no replacement apps for these, either. Also, some of these same older apps that 'shell' out to Internet Explorer will not work with anything above IE6. We fall in the 'not broken, does the job, leave it alone' category.

Comment: I have to wonder... (Score 5, Interesting) 462

by Kiralan (#37633830) Attached to: Ohio Supreme Court Drawn Into Magnetic Homes Case
... just how strong the magnetic field is, for it to affect the hard drive of a computer at any likely distance. It seems like metal objects would be flying through the air and sticking to the floor. Also, I have to wonder how a static magnetic field would affect most phones. Seems there would have to be an alternating field of some sort to do so. Finally, any links to the 'numbers' (field strength, gauss, whatever the proper term is)?
Bug

SCADA Problems Too Big To Call 'Bugs,' Says DHS 92

Posted by Soulskill
from the just-a-remote-unauthorized-access-feature dept.
chicksdaddy writes "With the one year anniversary of Stuxnet upon us, a senior cybersecurity official at the Department of Homeland Security says the agency is reevaluating whether it makes sense to warn the public about all of the security failings of industrial control system (ICS) and SCADA software used to control the U.S.'s critical infrastructure. DHS says it is rethinking the conditions under which it will use security advisories from ICS-CERT to warn the public about security issues in ICS products. The changes could recast certain kinds of vulnerabilities as 'design issues' rather than a security holes. No surprise: independent ICS experts like Ralph Langner worry that DHS is ducking responsibility for forcing changes that will secure the software used to run the nation's critical infrastructure. 'This radically cuts the amount of vulnerabilities in the ICS space by roughly 90%, since the vast majority of security "issues" we have are not bugs, but design flaws,' Langner writes on his blog. 'So today everybody has gotten much more secure because so many vulnerabilities just disappeared.'"

The universe seems neither benign nor hostile, merely indifferent. -- Sagan

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