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Comment: Re: I won't notice (Score 1) 325

by KingMotley (#48904179) Attached to: UHD Spec Stomps on Current Blu-ray Spec, But Will Consumers Notice?

I can't recall a time in which it refered to anything else. Here's another example from 1985: the original Atari at service manual. http://www.atarimania.com/docu...

So it has been in use for at least 30 years. Not exactly "new". If you can find another reference before that in which it talks about resolution being described in pixel density (which would be hard I imagine as screens didn't have pixels back then). You might be able to find a reference to a tv (which isn't the same field) describing resolution in terms of lines, but again, lines isn't density either.

Comment: Re:I won't notice (Score 1) 325

by KingMotley (#48899497) Attached to: UHD Spec Stomps on Current Blu-ray Spec, But Will Consumers Notice?

Your blind test isn't actually testing to see if people can tell the difference between 1080p and 4k. It's testing to see if people can correctly identify which is which. That's not the same thing.

A better blind-study is to have two TVs placed side by side of the same make and model. Turn off all upsampling and then show a 1080p image on one and a 4K image on the other alternating randomly the which is which and have the participant identify which image looks better. You will have a much different result, and have proven that people can tell the difference quite easily.

Comment: Re:I won't notice (Score 3, Interesting) 325

by KingMotley (#48899447) Attached to: UHD Spec Stomps on Current Blu-ray Spec, But Will Consumers Notice?

Let's try an example. Enter "resolution" into google. What does it say?

the degree of sharpness of a computer-generated image as measured by the number of dots per linear inch in a hard-copy printout or the number of pixels across and down on a display screen. Their resolution never failed them, their fervour seemed never slackened.

Google says you are wrong.

Let's see what Microsoft says. Right click your desktop, and choose "Screen Resolution". What does it say? Microsoft says:

Resolution: 2560x1440 (Recommended)

Boy those silly software guys must have got it all wrong. Let's check the hardware guys... How about dell?
http://accessories.us.dell.com...

Under tech spec, that monitor says:

Native Resolution 1920 x 1200

Guess the hardware guys are wrong too. So who uses it the one true "Jane Q. Public" way?

Comment: Re:I won't notice (Score 1) 325

by KingMotley (#48899399) Attached to: UHD Spec Stomps on Current Blu-ray Spec, But Will Consumers Notice?

Don't misuse the word then try to tell me it "always has been". That's just plain false. "Never was" would be closer to the truth.

Resolution has always referred to the number of pixels available on the screen.

Dictionary.com:

1. the maximum number of pixels that can be displayed on a monitor, expressed as (number of horizontal pixels) x (number of vertical pixels), i.e., 1024x768. The ratio of horizontal to vertical resolution is usually 4:3, the same as that of conventional television sets.

In windows, when you go the screen resolution dialog, you tell it how many pixels by how many pixels your display is. It's been that way since Windows 2.0 back in 1987.

Comment: Re:Nevada (Score 1) 165

by KingMotley (#48827341) Attached to: Elon Musk Plans To Build Hyperloop Test Track

Actually, a great location would be fermi-lab in Batavia, IL. Plenty of space there considering they built it for the large collider, in fact, he could probably build it right above the collider ring and there should be very little no/resistance and no environmental impact. Not to mention the near access to some of the countries best minds right on campus.

Comment: Re:Dewhat? (Score 4, Funny) 150

by KingMotley (#48806047) Attached to: Wireless Keylogger Masquerades as USB Phone Charger

When I was in the USAF I had great fun telling users that they could have a wireless keyboard & mouse just as soon as they found FIPS 140-2 compliant ones. I then told them that not only do none exist to our knowledge, but none are planned. The main problem being once you put serious encryption in there(as 140-2 requires), you're looking at a keyboard/mouse that are closer to smartphones than keyboards. IE a AA won't last a few months, you'll need to charge it like you do your smartphone. AES encryption also isn't intended for 8-16 bits at a time, so it's not really efficient there.

That's easy to solve. Since the keyboard and mouse are very likely near a PC, just run a charging cable to one of it's USB ports and never disconnect it. Then you can get rid of the battery completely. Problem solved. Then you've got a nice battery-less, always charged wireless keyboard and mouse. Tada!

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