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Comment: WTF is this noise? (Score 2, Insightful) 464

by KillerCow (#34656552) Attached to: Scientifically, You Are Likely In the Slowest Line

FIRST... no he dose not prove that you are in the SLOWEST line. He demonstrates that it's most likely that you are NOT IN THE FASTEST LINE. The exact same argument can be used to show that you are likely NOT IN THE SLOWEST line [of course, Slashdot editors and readers have never written any kind of mathematical proof, so the concept of "similarly" is foreign to them].

SECOND... this is elementary probability... barely even high-school level.

Given 3 lines
WLOG, randomly choose one
there is 1/3 probability that your line is the fastest
therefore there is 2/3 probability that your line is not fastest
therefore it is more likely that you are not in the fastest line

THIRD... there is nothing ironic about the single queue being fastest. This is obvious to anyone who has even set next to someone who's brother's dog licked someone who accidentally clicked on the wiki page for queuing theory.

I cannot believe that this drivel got posted. Apparently, Slashdot is now for remedial math. AND the poster (and editors) didn't even get it right! Slashdot editors fail remedial math.

I know this site went to shit about 7 or 8 years ago, but all nerd cred is forever lost in my eyes. It is now just for 12 year old mouth breathers who have no idea what they are talking about.

Logging into my account that I created when I officially gave up on this website. I am not going back to routing *.slashdot.org to 0.0.0.0 so that I am never tempted to return here on a lark.

Medicine

UK's FSA Finds No Health Benefits To Organic Food 921

Posted by samzenpus
from the 30-day-detox-delusion dept.
blackbeak writes "The UK Food Standards Agency's 'Independant Organic Review' results were just released, and the BBC rushed to publish the findings in the shockingly titled article, 'No Health Benefits to Organic Food.' From the article, 'There is little difference in nutritional value and no evidence of any extra health benefits from eating organic produce, UK researchers found.' A peek into the research at Postpeakpublishing provides a slightly deeper look."
Government

Canada Considering Online Voting In Elections 324

Posted by timothy
from the no-more-polls-here-in-canada-south dept.
ehud42 writes "Slashdot readers generally agree that voting machines such as those from Diebold are a bad idea. Well, what about online voting? That is what the Vancouver Sun is reporting. Given that voter turnout in our most recent election was the worst on record, Elections Canada is kicking around the idea of allowing voters to register online, update registration information online, and maybe even vote online."
The Almighty Buck

Why Isn't the US Government Funding Research? 599

Posted by samzenpus
from the we-got-all-the-science-we-need dept.
thesandbender writes "The recent post about GM opening its own battery research facility led me to wonder why the US government is pouring billions into buying companies instead of heavily funding useful research. You can give $10 billion to a company to squander or you can invest $10 billion into a battery research and just give the findings to the whole of the US industry for free. From a historical standpoint, the US government has little experience with commercial enterprise ... but has an amazing record for driving innovation. The Manhattan Project and the Apollo moon missions are two of the pinnacles of 20th century scientific achievement, yet it seems to me that this drive died in the '70s and that's when the US started its slow decline. To be true to the 'Ask Slashdot' theme, what practical research do you think the US government should embark upon to get the most return for its citizens and the world?"
Programming

Can "Page's Law" Be Broken? 255

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the sounds-about-right dept.
theodp writes "Speaking at the Google I/O Developer Conference, Sergey Brin described Google's efforts to defeat "Page's Law," the tendency of software to get twice as slow every 18 months. 'Fortunately, the hardware folks offset that,' Brin joked. 'We would like to break Page's Law and have our software become increasingly fast on the same hardware.' Page, of course, refers to Google co-founder Larry Page, last seen delivering a nice from-the-heart commencement address at Michigan that's worth a watch (or read)."

A System For Handling 'Impostor' Complaints 165

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the just-let-everyone-fight-to-the-death dept.
Frequent Slashdot contributor Bennett Haselton writes "A woman sued Yahoo because they wouldn't remove a page created by her ex-boyfriend pretending to be her and soliciting strangers for sex. What would be an effective system for large companies like Yahoo to handle 'impostor' complaints, without getting bogged down by phony complaints and unrelated disputes? This is a harder problem than it seems because of the several possible cases that have to be considered. One possible solution is given here." Read on for Bennett's analysis.
Privacy

Court Sets Rules For RIAA Hard Drive Inspection 470

Posted by Soulskill
from the this-far-and-no-farther dept.
NewYorkCountryLawyer writes "In a Boston RIAA case, SONY BMG Music Entertainment v. Tenenbaum, the Court has issued a detailed protective order establishing strict protocols for the RIAA's requested inspection of the defendant's hard drive, in order to protect the defendant's privacy. The order (PDF) provides that the hard drive will be turned over to a computer forensics expert of the RIAA's choosing, for mirror imaging, but that only the forensics expert — and not the plaintiffs or their attorneys — will be able to examine the mirror image. The forensics expert will then issue a report which will describe (a) any music files found on the drive, (b) any file-sharing information associated with each file, and any other records of file-sharing activity, and (c) any evidence that the hard-drive has been 'wiped' or erased since the initiation of the litigation. The expert will be precluded from examining 'any non-relevant files or data, including ... emails, word-processing documents, PDF documents, spreadsheet documents, image files, video files, or stored web-pages.'"
Earth

Climate Engineering As US Policy? 355

Posted by samzenpus
from the get-in-there-and-fix-it dept.
EricTheGreen writes "The Associated Press has an article featuring Obama administration science advisor John Holdren discussing potential climate engineering responses to global warming. Among the possible approaches? His own version of Operation Dark Storm — shooting micro-particulate pollution high into the atmosphere to reflect the sun's rays. I'm sure the rest of the world would have no issue with that at all, of course. Yikes ..."
The Almighty Buck

When To Consider Taking Shares In an IT Company? 315

Posted by timothy
from the opportunity-costs-and-the-time-value-of-time dept.
pgpark writes "I've been working as a key resource for a small IT consulting firm in the US. While the job has been interesting and the company's growth quite impressive over the last few years, it's been almost half a dozen years now and being ready for something new, I was ready to quit for consulting. It looks like the CEO would prefer to see me stay, as she is offering me ten percent of shares in the company in exchange for five additional years of my services. So the big question for me now is 'should I stay or should I go now?' Have you guys on Slashdot ever been dealing with such a situation? What points would you consider in order to make your choice?"
Earth

More Climate Scientists Now Support Geoengineering 458

Posted by Soulskill
from the this-earth-is-busted-let's-build-a-new-one dept.
ofcourseyouare writes "The Independent is a UK newspaper which has been pushing hard for cuts in CO2 emissions for years. It recently polled a group of 'the world's leading climate scientists,' revealing a 'growing support for geoengineering' in addition to cutting CO2 — not as a substitute. For example, Jim Lovelock, author of The Gaia Theory, comments: 'I disagree that geoengineering the climate is a dangerous distraction and I disagree that on no account should it ever be considered. I strongly agree that we now need a "plan B" where a geoengineering strategy is drawn up in parallel with other measures to curb CO2 emissions.' Professor Kerry Emanuel of MIT said, 'While a geoengineering solution is bound to be less than desirable, the probability of getting global agreement on emissions reductions before it is too late is very small.'"
Google

As Christmas Bonus, Google Hands Out "Dogfood" 366

Posted by kdawson
from the meaty-bits-with-gravy dept.
theodp writes "You know times are tough when the best place to work in America replaces holiday bonuses with a request for unpaid labor. Blaming the economic crisis, Google management has canceled the traditional cash holiday bonus — reportedly as much as $20K-$30K per Googler — and substituted an unlocked Google Android cell phone, retail price $400. An accompanying email calls for employees to celebrate the 'chance for us to once again dogfood a product and make it even better!'" Update: 12/23 01:09 GMT by KD : A reader pointed out that comments to the article note a couple of inaccuracies: the Android phone being offered is an unlocked dev model, which goes for $400; and the reporter may have confused holiday bonuses with performance bonuses. The former have traditionally been in the range of $1,000, according to two comments.
The Internet

Network Neutrality Defenders Quietly Backing Off? 171

Posted by timothy
from the but-you-said-earlier dept.
SteveOHT writes "Google Inc. has approached major cable and phone companies that carry Internet traffic with a proposal to create a fast lane for its own content, according to documents reviewed by The Wall Street Journal. Google has traditionally been one of the loudest advocates of equal network access for all content providers. The story claims that Microsoft, Yahoo, and Amazon have quietly withdrawn from a coalition of companies and groups backing network neutrality (the coalition is not named), though Amazon's name is reportedly once again listed on the coalition's Web site. Google has already responded, calling the WSJ story "confused" and explaining that they're only talking about edge caching, and remain as committed as ever to network neutrality. The blogosphere is alight with the debate.
Transportation

Feds Target "Mongols" Biker Club's Intellectual Property 393

Posted by kdawson
from the shirt-off-your-back dept.
couchslug writes in with a Reuters account of a Federal raid on a California-based motorcycle club, the Mongols, on charges "ranging from murder and robbery to extortion, money laundering, gun trafficking and drug dealing." The interesting twist is that the authorities are asking the courts to seize the IP of the biker club — specifically, their trademarked name "Mongols." "Federal agents and police in seven states arrested more than 60 members of the Mongols motorcycle gang on Tuesday in a sweep that also targeted for the first time an outlaw group's 'intellectual property,' prosecutors said. The arrests cap a three-year undercover investigation in which US agents posed as gang members and their girlfriends to infiltrate the group, even submitting to polygraph tests administered by the bikers ... [T]he name 'Mongols,' which appears on the gang's arm patch insignia, was trademarked by the group. The indictment seeks a court order outlawing further use of the name, which would allow any police officer 'who sees a Mongol wearing this patch ... to stop that gang member and literally take the jacket right off his back' ..."

"We are on the verge: Today our program proved Fermat's next-to-last theorem." -- Epigrams in Programming, ACM SIGPLAN Sept. 1982

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