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Comment: Re:Seems to still be architecturaly-gimped (Score 2) 34

by Khyber (#49625495) Attached to: Intel Launches Xeon E7-8800 and E7-4800 V3 Processor Families

Quick clarification: Not the memory controller was gimped, but how processors communicated and shared stuff out of their memory to other processors was gimped. And the E7 v3 looks to have the same limitation. Pumping up QPI speed might help alleviate that SOME but nowhere near what's needed for multiple socket multiple GPU configs in a single non-nodal system.

Comment: Seems to still be architecturaly-gimped (Score 2) 34

by Khyber (#49625487) Attached to: Intel Launches Xeon E7-8800 and E7-4800 V3 Processor Families

It appears that they didn't do much to the QPI besides boost the speed a bit. That's not going to fare well in HPC stuff. The reason I didn't use the V2 E7-8*** line was because due to how gimped the memory architecture was, you could run 2 socket 4 GPU, 4 socket 2 GPU, but not 4/4.

It was cheaper, and just as effective, to go with the E5 instead, and make multiple node systems into a single box, instead. 8 socket, 12 GPU. Fuck yea.

Comment: Re:Not Actually $3500 (Score 1) 309

by Khyber (#49614101) Attached to: Tesla's Household Battery: Costs, Prices, and Tradeoffs

Or, I'm using those GRID cards for something else, entirely. It's still supporting everything else out there. Massive simulations for photons, that is what I'm doing. Well, with ONE of those full systems, anyways. I've got a couple more on the way.

I spit loads of data, rapidly. I need those SSDs.

Comment: Re:Not Actually $3500 (Score 1) 309

by Khyber (#49613321) Attached to: Tesla's Household Battery: Costs, Prices, and Tradeoffs

"Why does every solution need to fulfill oddball out of the way requirements?"

My oddball requirements would pretty much guarantee full energy independence for 99% of the general population and for 99% of the other 1%, with a proper solar panel array and one of those batteries + inverters per room. Even apartment complexes could utilize this, and so could many businesses. The benefit is expandability and over-storage so you're essentially guaranteed to not run out of power, ever. Modularity means instead of the whole house dying when your single-battery/inverter setup fails (in case your tie-in is faulty, some how,) the rest of the place can actually continue to operate.

Sure it'll be somewhat expensive, but the reduced strain on the battery packs by distributing it across many batteries and inverters will improve the lifespan of those components and reduce the lifetime maintenance costs. Those batteries might last well beyond their warranty period and still maintain a reasonable amount of charge level. The inverters are hopefully still good if they're of any quality.

MESSENGER was over-engineered with the expectation of one year of usefulness. We got more than that, way more. The Rovers were designed for what, six months? We got how long out of them?

Over-engineering is the way to go if you want something to last. Sure, it's expensive, but those savings will become quite apparent in the long run. The way technology is advancing, it's going to become an economic no-brainer soon enough.

Comment: Re:Not Actually $3500 (Score 1) 309

by Khyber (#49610989) Attached to: Tesla's Household Battery: Costs, Prices, and Tradeoffs

"Actually, I think you overestimate the amount of power used in many circumstances."

Actually, I think you're speaking for yourself when you don't have a clue what I have running in my home.

8 kWh computer (just mine, not including the other laptops and my SO's own computer.)
3 kWh in LED grow lights.
7.2 kWh A/C (this is California.)

And so on...

Comment: Re:Not Actually $3500 (Score 1) 309

by Khyber (#49610959) Attached to: Tesla's Household Battery: Costs, Prices, and Tradeoffs

"Most rooms shouldn't chew anywhere close to a kilowatt of power. What are you idiots DOING"

My computer alone uses almost 8kWh. I can eat that power pack for lunch.

When I cook, I use at minimum three stovetop elements simultaneously. The Tesla battery pack would DIE under just my normal cooking conditions.

Comment: Re:Not Actually $3500 (Score 4, Insightful) 309

by Khyber (#49608633) Attached to: Tesla's Household Battery: Costs, Prices, and Tradeoffs

Plus inverters? No. Plus inverter. That pack, if you look at the specs and do some math, is good for a single ~20A 120V circuit, given that it's sustained discharge is ~2kWh and peak is 3kWh. Reality is more like 15A. I wouldn't trust that pack for more than one room of my home. One for each room and multiple for the kitchen given the power drain an electric stove does per burner, be it element, induction, or IR, microwaves, dishwasher, refrigerator...

You can't have everything... where would you put it? -- Steven Wright

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