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Comment: Re:Supply / Demand curve (Score 1) 188

by roman_mir (#48682301) Attached to: Uber Pushing For Patent On Surge Pricing

You are talking about super regulated markets, markets where governments are heavily involved and declaring that the way they are regulated and corrupted by the governments is something that would prevent a bakery from changing prices on the fly should their market conditions change, for example a giant influx of consumers wouldn't change the market conditions for bakery enough to change prices. I showed that as market conditions change the producers quickly modify their behaviour. I don't know what you are even trying to say, however comparing stable and predictable market conditions to changing market conditions and declaring that changing market conditions do not cause producers to changing prices is too silly.

Comment: Re:Prediction: (Score 4, Insightful) 201

by daveschroeder (#48680051) Attached to: N. Korea Blames US For Internet Outage, Compares Obama to "a Monkey"

First of all, you say, "North Korea didn't hack Sony," as if it is an indisputable, known fact. It is not -- by any stretch of the imagination.

The fact is, it cannot be proven either way in a public forum, or without having independent access to evidence which proves -- from a social, not technical, standpoint -- how the attack originated. Since neither of those are possible, the MOST that can be accurate stated is that no one, in a public context, can definitively demonstrate for certain who hacked Sony.

Blameless in your scenario is the only entity actually responsible, which is that entity that attacked Sony in the first place.

Whether that is the DPRK, someone directed by the DPRK, someone else entirely, or a combination of the above, your larger point appears to be that somehow the US is to blame for a US subsidiary of a Japanese corporation getting hacked -- or perhaps simply for existing.

As a bonus, you could blame Sony for saying its security controls weren't strong enough, while still reserving enough blame for the US as the only "jackass".

Bravo.

Comment: Prediction: (Score 5, Insightful) 201

by daveschroeder (#48679895) Attached to: N. Korea Blames US For Internet Outage, Compares Obama to "a Monkey"

Many of the same slashdotters who accept "experts" who claim NK didn't hack Sony will readily accept as truth that it was "obviously" the US that attacked NK, even though there is even less objective proof of that, and could just as easily be some Anonymous offshoot, or any number of other organizations, or even North Korea itself.

See the logical disconnect, here?

For those now jumping on the "North Korea didn't hack Sony" bandwagon that some security "experts" are leading for their own political or ideological reasons, including using rationales as puzzling and pedestrian as source IP addresses of the attacks being elsewhere, some comments:

Attribution in cyber is hard, and the general public is never going to know the classified intelligence that went into making an attribution determination, and experts -- actual and self-appointed -- will make claims about what they think occurred.

With cyber, you could have nation-states, terrorists organizations, or even activist hacking groups attacking other nation-states, companies, or organizations, for any number of motives, and making it appear, from a social and technical standpoint, that the attack originated from and/or was ordered by another entity entirely.

That's a HUGE problem, but there are ways to mitigate it. A Sony "insider" may indeed -- wittingly or unwittingly -- have been key in pulling off this hack. That doesn't mean that DPRK wasn't involved. I am not making a formal statement one way or the other; just saying that the public won't be privy to the specific attribution rationale.

Also, any offensive cyber action that isn't totally worthless is going to attempt to mask or completely divert attention from its true origins (unless part of the strategic intent is to make it clear who did it), or at a minimum maintain some semblance of deniability.

At some point you have to apply Occam's razor and ask who benefits.

And for those riding the kooky "This is all a big marketing scam by Sony" train:

So, you're saying that Sony leaked thousands of extremely embarrassing and in some cases damaging internal documents and emails that will probably result in the CEO of Sony Pictures Entertainment being ousted, including private and statutorily-protected personal health information of employees, and issued terroristic messages threatening 9/11-style attacks at US movie theaters, committing dozens to hundreds of federal felonies, while derailing any hopes for a mass release and instead having it end up on YouTube for rental, all to promote one of hundreds of second-rate movies?

Yeah...no.

Comment: Re:Nice troll (Score 1) 519

by roman_mir (#48678719) Attached to: Paul Graham: Let the Other 95% of Great Programmers In

You are either a full or a liar, Henry Ford's model was not to pay workers so that they would 'buy' anything, his model was to pay more to his employees to reduce turn over of highly specialised professionals, who were becoming very efficient but leaving the company once they achieved proficiency to go work somewhere with less stress. So he doubled people's salary and reduced turnover, keeping the trained employees and doubling his productive output in a very short time after that.

He was NOT paying his people to buy anything, he was paying his people so that they would have hard time quitting the jobs.

The reality is that globalisation requires a real free market environment and that is something people really hate - competing and allowing the best competitors to become much wealthier while raising the overall standard of living in the economy.

You are growing statism, fascism and nazism and you are destroying individual freedoms with every new regulation, law, tax, barrier to entry, license, newly printed paper dollar and you think you can create a prosperous economy based on any of that, well you cannot and the time is proving that you cannot. No amount of natzism (national socialism) will help you because you are asking the wrong question, the answer doesn't matter.

The real question is what is virtue and not how to divide a shrinking pie. The virtue is in non-initiation of force and in allowing true free market economy based on capitalist principles to destroy the old guard, the fascism, the nazism, the socialism, those are self-destructing, corrupt principles that arise from position of desire to dictate to others. What is virtue is the only real question. Virtue is non-initiation of force and it leads to voluntary exchange and freedom, which is the only way to have a cooperative environment, where each works for himself, for his own profits, but the result is a robust wealthy economy.

Comment: Re:Supply / Demand curve (Score 1) 188

by roman_mir (#48678669) Attached to: Uber Pushing For Patent On Surge Pricing

Your example is false because it does not address real situations that a bakery can face that are caused by changing market conditions, you are looking at stable market environment and deduce that because bakeries in stable market environments can operate without changing prices that it means that those very bakeries would not change prices quickly if market environments changed quickly.

Comment: Re:What Paul Graham doesn't get... (Score 4, Insightful) 519

by Penguinisto (#48677435) Attached to: Paul Graham: Let the Other 95% of Great Programmers In

Paul Graham is correct (posting anonymously to keep my "foes" quota manageable).

No reason to hate someone if their argument is coherent and clear. So let's see what we have here...

The exact same complaints about wages were no doubt made when Jackie Robinson integrated USA baseball, or Red Aurbach began recruiting African American players.

Bad comparison; Jackie Robinson was a US-born citizen, as were his pioneer contemporaries. He wasn't shipped into the job from overseas and threatened with deportation if he bitched about his pay. He also didn't have rival baseball teams clamoring Congress for tickets to import more black players. Also, your argument sets up a strawman for later, the part which I won't even bother to address due to the fact that it is also irrelevant.

The arguments against Graham's do not suggest that programming will be weaker, or that the software industry will be weaker, by allowing H1B recruits.

False argument: no one is credibly arguing that importation of a rockstar H1B-holders would weaken programming or the software industry in the US --if that were truly the case (it most often isn't).

I can say however, as someone who once worked at an H1-B-happy corporation, that I've found one big fat problem: cultural and language difficulties have often gotten in the way of communication within a given team, causing information and data to take up to twice as long to get across (especially if a conference phone is involved). I am confident that others have also found this to be a problem, and I defy you to prove otherwise.

Comment: Re:show me the measurement for programmers (Score 5, Interesting) 519

by Penguinisto (#48677125) Attached to: Paul Graham: Let the Other 95% of Great Programmers In

Show me how do you measure what a great programmer is?

Why, the ability to work 110 hours each week to crank out working code for $15/hr, of course!

Of course, it's easy for the VC types to demand more foreign (read: cheap and abusable) labor... it allows them (and their beneficiaries, the start-ups) to spend less money on overhead like employee salaries, and more money on infrastructure, executive bonuses, wild parties... shit like that.

If you have a procedure with 10 parameters, you probably missed some.

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