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+ - U.C. Berkeley "big data" class this week. Free enrollment. 2 days.->

Submitted by
pmdubs
pmdubs writes "The U.C. Berkeley AMPLab research group will be hosting a free "Big Data Bootcamp" on-campus and online, August 21 and 22. The AMP Camp will feature hands-on tutorials on big data analysis using the AMPLab software stack, including Spark, Shark, and Mesos. These tools work hand-in-hand with technologies like Hadoop to provide high performance, low latency data analysis. AMP Camp will also include high level overviews of warehouse scale computing, presentations on several big data use-cases, and talks on related projects."
Link to Original Source

+ - Where the Candidates Stand on Net Neutrality->

Submitted by
nmpost
nmpost writes "Net neutrality is one of the biggest issues with regards to the internet today. At the heart of the issues is how much control ISPs will be allowed to have over their networks. Each candidate has come out with a strong position on the matter, and whoever wins will have a drastic affect on the future of the internet. Barack Obama has been a propenent of Net Neutrality. Under his watch, the FCC has implemented Net Neutrality rules. These restrictions did not apply to wireless networks, though, a gaping loophole that in the future will be problematic as mobile internet is exploding in popularity. The issue is one that needs to be addressed in the future. Until it is, Obama can only be given a barely passing grade in regards to net neutrality. Republican Presidential candidate Mitt Romney has come down on the other side of the issue. The former Massachusetts governor strongly opposes net neutrality. According to Politico, Romney believes net neutrality will restrict ISPs, and that they alone should govern their networks. The governor has stated that he wants as little regulation of the internet as possible."
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Businesses

+ - Are 12-16 Hour Workdays 'A Good Life'?

Submitted by theodp
theodp (442580) writes "'It's important to me,' former Opsware CEO Ben Horowitz recalls saying as he threatened a manager for termination because one of his subordinates failed to conduct 1:1 meetings, 'that the people who spend 12 to 16 hours/day here, which is most of their waking life, have a good life. It’s why I come to work.' Ben seems to be cut from the same management cloth as new Yahoo CEO Marissa "I-Don't-Really-Believe-In-Burnout" Mayer, who boasted how she solved the work-life balance problems of mother-of-three 'Katie' [presumably Twitter's Katie Stanton], who was required to attend nightly 1 a.m. video conference calls with her Google Finance team in Bangalore, by no longer making Katie also stay for late meetings on her Google day shift on those occasions where it'd make her miss her kids' soccer games and recitals."
Science

+ - First Evidence that Insects Rely on Photosynthesis->

Submitted by tedlistens
tedlistens (1697590) writes "The idea that aphids may use photosynthesis, as plants do, is based on the recent finding that the bugs are able to synthesize pigments called carotenoids. These pigments are common and necessary for many animals (for non-photosynthesis uses, like maintaining a healthy immune system), but the animal must consume them from outside sources. So far, only plants, algae, fungi, and bacteria are known to be able to synthesize carotenoids themselves, and, in all of those organisms, carotenoids are a key part of photosynthesis. While the co-author of the study, published in Nature's open-access journal Scientific Reports, cautions that more research is needed before we can determine if aphids are photosynthesizing like non-animals, it stil could be one of the more remarkable findings in biology in recent memory, and may hold promise for helping address humanity’s food crisis."
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+ - Options for FOSS remote support software? 1

Submitted by Albanach
Albanach (527650) writes "I'm sure I'm not alone in being asked to help friends and family with computer issues. These folk typically run Windows (everything from XP onward) or OS X (typically 10.4 onward). Naturally, desktop sharing is often much easier than trying to talk the other end through various steps. I've found free sites like join.me but they don't work with OS X 10.4, neither does the Chrome plugin. I'd also prefer not to compromise security by using a third party in the middle of the connection. Is there a good, free solution I can run on my linux box that supports old and new clients that run Windows, OS X and possibly linux? I'd love it if the users could simply bring their systems up to date, but that doesn't solve the third party issue and it's not easy when it requires a non-trivial RAM upgrade on a Mac Mini."
Windows

+ - Build your own supercomputer->

Submitted by
Barence
Barence writes "PC Pro has a feature explaining how a home-brew approach can provide a usable measure of supercomputing power at a comparatively realistic price. The feature explores how it's possible to create 16-core and upward home computers with clustering, even using a hotchpotch of systems including netbooks, laptops, workstations and high-performance servers.

"Windows-based clusters can be assembled quite easily using the Windows HPC Server 2008 operating system, and Microsoft provides guidelines for creating 'cluster-aware' applications that will make use of cluster resources when run on such a system," the feature explains. "Alternatively, there are various free Linux distributions that are designed for clustering, such as openMosix and ClusterKnoppix. These provide a user-friendly experience that makes it almost effortless to set up a cluster of any size using the popular Beowulf system.""

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+ - SPAM: Icse board sample papers for physics

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "CSE Issued the syllabus for the students and accordingly we have make some ICSE sample papers for Physics for the students who are going to appear in the examinations, so that they can practice the sample papers and can score distinction marks in the Exams. As we all know, Physics is the part of Science. Science includes three main parts, Chemistry, Biology and Physics."
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Censorship

+ - Google Mail now blocked in China

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "For some time, access to Gmail has been deliberately "delayed" in China.
Since about 6pm on Friday, local time it has been completely blocked. The login screen "may" come up, but login itself just times out."
China

+ - China arrested a CIA spy->

Submitted by Taco Cowboy
Taco Cowboy (5327) writes "A 38-year-old Chinese national, who was a secretary to Qiu Jin, the deputy minister of state security, is alleged to have been recruited and trained by the CIA and was arrested by the Chinese authority sometime this year

It was reported that the man was approached by the CIA while he was a student studying in the USA

To "cement" the relationship, the CIA arranged a classic "honey trap", where the guy was photographed with a woman in a compromising setting in a Hong Kong apartment. And with that, the guy is coerced into spying for the CIA"

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Space

+ - So that is why Big Bird is yellow->

Submitted by
davekleiman
davekleiman writes "A new photo from a NASA sun-watching spacecraft highlights a huge solar feature that looks a lot like the beloved Big Bird from the children's television show "Sesame Street." "I can't get over how much this looks like Big Bird — but it is a coronal hole on the sun," reads a Twitter post today by Camilla Corona SDO, the spacecraft's rubber chicken mascot."
Now the big question is where are Bert and Ernie, maybe it was them that flew the ship that landed Big Bird there."

Link to Original Source

+ - Making use of the LLVM project on Linux->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "We're currently working on a C++ project, where we're able to use some new C++11 features and thus have decided to use a recent version of the Clang compiler and libc++, both from the LLVM(http://llvm.org) project. After manually editing and adapting some libc++ Makefiles for Linux specific settings we're very pleased, so far.
But why aren't tools like libc++(http://libcxx.llvm.org/) or the debugger lldb(http://lldb.llvm.org/) from LLVM more popular on Linux?
It seems to me that to some extend not even the buildsystem for those tools are Linux-friendly and you have to fiddle with it, by yourself.
May this be the case, or even cause of the low popularity?"

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