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Comment: Re:Unfortunately ... (Score 2, Interesting) 708

by Keldi (#25402147) Attached to: UK Court Rejects Encryption Key Disclosure Defense
Hell, on top of that, encrypt two volumes with two different crimes. One volume with a lesser crime (jaywalking), containing a video of you jaywalking and a text explanation as a "proof of concept". That way you can divulge that key to decrypt that volume and show you're not just bullshitting. Then, a second more serious crime confession to encrypt the second volume with the real data. The first will show that you have encrypted drives with confessions, to give weight to the argument that divulging the second drive's key would be self-incrimination.
PC Games (Games)

+ - EVE Players Revolt Over Subscription Changes

Submitted by Keldi
Keldi (978805) writes "EVE Online's character advancement involves skills that train while both logged in and logged off, ranging from 15 minutes to 30-60 days of training per skill. Up until now, if you set a long skill to train and your account expired, it would continue to train while unsubscribed. CCP has [url=http://myeve.eve-online.com/ingameboard.asp?a=topic&threadID=896003]announced [/url] that this feature will be removed on Wednesday, with no reduction in skill training lengths associated with the change. Their users are up in arms, with 19 pages of replies in 3 hours, many including promises to unsubscribe permanently. "Ghost training" gave users a way to take a break from the game and come back to a new ship, or a new type of weapon, or a newly available set of skills. Looks like those days are over. A great number of ships and pieces of equipment require 30+ days to train for, usually to just unlock one model of ship. To make things worse, EVE encourages the use of multiple accounts at once, even offering a "Power of Two" program to buy two accounts at once for a reduced price. This change's most vocal opponents are those with multiple accounts, who would be impacted to a much greater extent than players with a single account. Many players have 2-3 accounts, some with as many as 8. At $15 a month, it quickly adds up."
Google

+ - Cox Customers Cannot Connect To Google 7

Submitted by
Anonymous Coward
Anonymous Coward writes "Right now Cox Communications Customers cannot connect to google or gmail. They are being blocked by Cox.
The only way to connect is to use a direct IP address. In fact Cox knows it has a problem and if you call their tech support line they specifically acknowledge that customers cannot connect to Google. This seems awfully suspicious... Metered internet access?(!)"
Role Playing (Games)

+ - Chinese gamers get to execute corrupt officials->

Submitted by
enharmonix
enharmonix writes "The Chinese government has launched an online game where players advance by killing corrupt government officials using weapons, magic, or torture. Apparently it's very popular — the game has already reached 100,000 downloads and even had to be taken offline while they upgrade their systems to handle the load."
Link to Original Source
The Internet

+ - The Pirate Bay About To Relaunch Suprnova.org 3

Submitted by kungfujesus
kungfujesus (969971) writes "The Pirate Bay crew has been working on this secret project for quite some time now. Back in April they wrote a cryptic post on their blog announcing that something was coming. In a response to this announcement TPB admin Brokep told TorrentFreak: "The past, the present and the future. It's all the same, but one thing's for sure, we will radiate for weeks", today it became clear that he was referring to the resurrection of Suprnova. Article Here"
United States

+ - Forensics Expert says Al-Qaeda Images Altered

Submitted by WerewolfOfVulcan
WerewolfOfVulcan (320426) writes "Wired reports that researcher Neal Krawetz revealed some veeeeeery interesting things about the Al-Qaeda images that our government loves to show off.

From the article: "Krawetz was also able to determine that the writing on the banner behind al-Zawahiri's head was added to the image afterward. In the second picture above showing the results of the error level analysis, the light clusters on the image indicate areas of the image that were added or changed. The subtitles and logos in the upper right and lower left corners (IntelCenter is an organization that monitors terrorist activity and As-Sahab is the video production branch of al Qaeda) were all added at the same time, while the banner writing was added at a different time, likely around the same time that al-Zawahiri was added, Krawetz says." Why would Al-Qaeda add an IntelCenter logo to their video? Why would IntelCenter add an Al-Qaeda logo? Methinks we have bigger fish to fry than Gonzo and his fired attorneys... }:-) The article contains links to Krawetz's presentation and the source code he used to analyze the photos."
Businesses

+ - The Internet "Bubble" Is NOT About to Burs->

Submitted by
thingyamabob
thingyamabob writes "There will not be a repeat of the previous dot-com bubble burst any time in the next few years, no matter what internet pundits like John Dvorak have to say. Articles like John's are written for those who know the internet only as "that thing where I check my email". Personally, I rely on PC Magazine for my cutting edge internet news as much as I rely on Good Housekeeping for my cutting edge internet news. His "brave" attempt to go against the mainstream and warn us poor common folk of our pending doom has so many flaws and baseless claims, that John's motives are obvious."
Link to Original Source
Google

+ - Google's $4.6bn wireless plan grounded

Submitted by Almir
Almir (1096395) writes "Google's plans to bid for a portion of America's airwaves were dealt a blow last night when the Federal Communications Commission refused to approve two of the internet company's conditions. Google had said that it would match the $4.6 billion (£2.3 billion) reserve price set for a 700MHz licence, which could be used to provide wireless broadband internet access across the US from 2009, if the eventual winner was forced to meet four "open access" conditions. However, two more controversial provisions put forward by Google, which would require the eventual licensee to sell access to its network on a wholesale basis to rivals and allow other parties physical access to infrastructure at realistic points, were not included."

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