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+ - MIT computer program makes TCP twice as fast->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "MIT is claiming they can make the Internet faster if we let computers redesign TCP/IP instead of coding it by hand. They used machine learning to design a version of TCP that's twice the speed and causes half the delay, even with modern bufferbloated networks. They also claim it's more "fair." The researchers have put up a lengthy FAQ and source code where they admit they don't know why the system works, only that it goes faster than normal TCP. On the same day that MIT went to court to stop Aaron Swartz's documents from being published, the school is devoting its main website to an animated GIF about faster TCP."
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+ - New "mosh" modernizes SSH with IP roaming, instant local echo->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Launched in 1995, SSH quickly became the king of network login tools, supplanting the old insecure mainstays TELNET and RLOGIN. But 17 years later, a group of MIT hackers have come out with "mosh", which claims to modernize the most annoying parts of SSH. Mosh keeps its connection alive when clients roam among WiFi networks or switch to 3G, and gives instant feedback on typing (and deleting). No more annoying network lag on typing, the MIT boffins say, citing Bufferbloat, which has been increasing latencies. Not sure if the SSH folks will have some tricks up their sleeves though. It's not clear if mosh's security has been vetted yet either."
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Wireless Networking

+ - The many faces of 3G->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Did you ever notice how each new generation of cell-phone tech gets branded "3G", and the previous thing is retroactively downgraded to some lesser number of G's? An MIT engineer explains why in this brilliant essay about "3G" in the last 10 years, showing how the cell carriers have kept offering it and swiping it away to sell more stuff. He cites numerous Cingular/AT&T and Sprint press releases showing how the companies have made "3G" into a brand name ideally suited for amnesiac consumers. Meanwhile, no cell carrier is foolish enough to sell you bottom-line throughput like an ISP in 1996 — you could actually hold them to that."
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Unix

+ - Writing filesystems now as easy as Web apps->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Remember the old days of writing Web apps, when you had to parse the CGI arguments separately, do all the safety checks yourself and implement everything manually? Neither do I, but it looks like all the cool stuff from Web apps is making its way to writing filesystems. This guy shows how to writing an entire Linux filesystem in 50 lines of Python using "dispatch" techniques totally stolen from Ruby on Rails. Are we ready to give up the Web and go back to just using the filesystem for everything, the way Unix intended?"
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+ - Getting bitten by constant factors in MySQL->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Think you're pretty good around a database? I thought I knew plenty about indices and the sweet performance of binary search, but it turns out that when it comes to MySQL, things aren't quite as simple as that! No matter how many fancy indices you have, if you load your data into MySQL in the wrong order (at least if you're using InnoDB), constant factors will totally bite you — as I unfortunately learned this week."
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+ - International Longest Tweet Contest seeks entries->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The 1st International Longest Tweet Contest is open for submissions until April 12. It looks to be a take-off of the famous Obfuscated C Contest. So far the record is 4.2 kilobits encoded per tweet, based on exploiting the fact that Twitter actually passes the full 31 bits of ISO 10646 (the international standard that Unicode is based on), not the roughly 20.08 bits/character of Unicode itself."
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Programming

Simpler "Hello World" Demonstrated In C 582

Posted by kdawson
from the non-obfuscated dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Wondering where all that bloat comes from, causing even the classic 'Hello world' to weigh in at 11 KB? An MIT programmer decided to make a Linux C program so simple, she could explain every byte of the assembly. She found that gcc was including libc even when you don't ask for it. The blog shows how to compile a much simpler 'Hello world,' using no libraries at all. This takes me back to the days of programming bare-metal on DOS!"
Programming

+ - Simpler "Hello World" demonstrated in C->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Wondering where all that bloat comes from so even the classic "Hello world" now takes 11k? An MIT programmer decided to make a Linux C program so simple, she could explain every byte of the assembly. She found gcc was including libc even when you don't ask for it, and shows how to compile a much simpler "Hello world" — using no libraries at all. This takes me back to the days of programming bare-metal on DOS!"
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Linux

+ - "Mythical Man-Month" supposedly busted by MIT firm-> 2

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "We all know about the Mythical Man-Month, the argument that adding more programmers to a software project just makes it later and later. A Linux startup out of MIT claims to have busted the myth of the myth, using an MIT holiday month to hire 20 college student interns to get all their work done in a month and quadrupling its productivity. This picture shows the interns jammed in like sardines to a tiny room. We've written about them previously, but is this really who you want working on your kernel?"
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