Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop


Forgot your password?
Slashdot Deals: Deal of the Day - Pay What You Want for the Learn to Code Bundle, includes AngularJS, Python, HTML5, Ruby, and more. ×

Submission + - Kickstarter breached; personal information, password hashes stolen

Kalriath writes: Crowdfunding site Kickstarter has admitted to a security breach on Wednesday in which personal information (name, address, email) and encrypted passwords were stolen.

On Wednesday night, law enforcement officials contacted Kickstarter and alerted us that hackers had sought and gained unauthorized access to some of our customers' data. Upon learning this, we immediately closed the security breach and began strengthening security measures throughout the Kickstarter system.

While no credit card data was accessed, some information about our customers was. Accessed information included usernames, email addresses, mailing addresses, phone numbers, and encrypted passwords. Actual passwords were not revealed, however it is possible for a malicious person with enough computing power to guess and crack an encrypted password, particularly a weak or obvious one.

Kickstarter further goes on to say that older passwords were uniquely salted and hashed with SHA-1, and newer passwords with bcrypt.

Submission + - Judge in Dotcom Case Steps Down (

Kalriath writes: After calling the United States "the enemy" at the NetHui conference last week (reported on Slashdot), Judge David Harvey has stepped down from the Dotcom case citing beliefs that the comments could reflect on his impartiality. From the New Zealand Herald:

An internet law expert, Judge Harvey had been considered the perfect choice to hear arguments on whether Dotcom and his Megaupload colleagues should be extradited by the United States to face charges of criminal copyright violation. The district court's chief judge Jan-Marie Doogue said Judge Harvey had made the decision to step down from hearing the case. "He recognises that remarks made in the context of a paper he delivered on copyright law at a recent internet conference could reflect on his impartiality and that the appropriate response is for him to step down from the case.

No word on what this means for the extradition hearing, but it probably isn't good news for Dotcom.

Submission + - FBI ordered by NZ judge to start copying Dotcom data

Kalriath writes: New Zealand High Court Justice Helen Winkelmann today ordered that the FBI begin copying the more than 150TB of information which was seized during the raid earlier this year, a month after another judge ordered that Dotcom's lawyers could get a copy of all the data held by the US government for his defense. The FBI claims that to give him this information, he must appear in a US court, creating quite a catch-22

Submission + - US Company Hijacks OSS Project, Trademarks Name (

Kalriath writes: "Horowhenua Library Trust is the birth place of Koha and the longest serving member of the Koha community. After over a year of battling against it, PTFS/Liblime have managed to have their application for a Trademark on Koha in New Zealand accepted. We now have 3 months to object, but to do so involves lawyers and money."

And some background courtesy of

"For those of you who don’t know [which can’t be many] the background, in the late nineties the Horowhenua Library Trust decided not to go down the traditional path of changing their LMS and developed open-source product called Koha. This was given to the world and is now used widely internationally. A few years ago a company in the US called PTFS/Liblime attempted to hijack Koha and turn it into their proprietary LMS. They have also sort [sic] to claim ownership of the name Koha."

I have a theory that it's impossible to prove anything, but I can't prove it.