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Comment: There will always be something better (Score 1) 125 125

Front end browser development is littered with dozens of front end frame works that have fizzled over the years. YUI, Prototype, script. aculo.us, etc. All popular in their day. jQuery is still active but certainly on the decline.

You want to be a good front end developer? Learn about the DOM model. Learn about HTTP, HTTP/2 and CSS. Learn the fundamentals of how all that stuff works together and then you'll never need to worry about picking up whatever front end framework is used by the cool kids.

Comment: Re:Amazing and dreadful, simultaneously (Score 2) 380 380

Huh? Most contractors don't make time and a half but they are hourly workers. I make a lot of money as a contractor. Substantially more than a FT employee, even covering my own taxes, insurance and PTO days. Because working over 40 costs money they almost never ask for it. No one bothers me at home because they could easily rack up hours they don't have budgeted for.

As far as getting dismissed? Not really a factor. In most markets IT workers are in high demand. Canceling your contract risks being without a worker for weeks if not months. If the consulting firm finds out they dismissed after asking for unpaid hours that's likely to back fire.

Now if you're an H1B contractor? That's a different ball of wax. Employers can leverage your ability to stay in the country. Those guys can get screwed on wages and can be replaced easily.

If you are getting squeezed in your market then maybe it's time to move to a better place.

Comment: Should We Trust Kaspersky? (Score 4, Interesting) 53 53

As we seem to be heading back down into the familiar territory of the cold war I often wonder if nationalism is something we should consider when thinking about security. For instance I believe that Kaspersky is a very talented company but I can't help but to feel that they would be quite willing to turn a blind eye to malware from their own government. I hear commercials for Kaspersky threat detection software all the time but I would be hard pressed to actually use any of it. It certainly seems China, Russia and parts of Europe are taking country of origin into account when evaluating American security products. Am I wearing a tin-foil hat in feeling we should think twice about trusting Kaspersky?

Comment: Too Many Insurance Companies (Score 4, Insightful) 532 532

The issue is there are too many insurance companies. The core is the same, as in there's a claim and there's standardized billing codes for procedures. However, each insurance company has a different set of policies on how visits should be coded.

This has lead to health care providers hiring claims optimizers that help them code the visit to extract the most money from the insurance company. Which leads to insurance companies hiring claims optimizers to shape policy to reduce the amount they pay. Then times that by the number of insurance companies they might deal with. Add a little more complication if you're insurance is out of state and they use another companies network and policies. It's a giant clusterfuck.

This is also one of the major drivers of health care cost. There are plenty of other countries that have private health insurance. The difference is the gov't sets a common claims format and policy. They typically also set the base cost of each service (adjusted for cost of living for the area). That means the insurance companies compete on having lower administration costs and programs to make the members healthier.

Comment: Re:Hello? The 21st Century Calling (Score 3, Interesting) 229 229

I'm sure the Chinese Gov't would be more than happy to have the US Gov't check the serial numbers on those Xeon chips to tell were the source is. Obviously not. As long as the chips are allowed to be exported to China for general business use I don't see any way for the US to control it. At best whatever quasi Gov't agency in China has to buy through a 3rd party and falsify some paperwork

It's not like China doesn't have FABs and engineers that could make a similar CPU. What Intel fears the most is this will kickstart some national pride that's going to end with gov't funded R&D to make high end CPUs and GPUs.

Comment: Re:Why not hire in "Flyover Land" before India? (Score 1) 442 442

Because "Flyover Land" is still pretty expensive. There's a lot of reasons to choose H1-B. The biggest being that they need to be sponsored. That sponsorship puts the employee under the thumb of the employer. They can revoke that sponsorship at any time forcing the employee to leave the country if they cannot find a new sponsor.

Some corporate bean counter figures he can pay a college hire and a H1-B about the same. The college hire will gain experience and will want a raise. If they don't get it they'll leave. The H1-B visa holder doesn't have that flexibility.

The problem for the companies is that the current Visa caps means even H1-B workers are in short supply. This has not gone unnoticed to the folks that run the consulting companies that often sponsor the Visa candidates. I was talking to an IT manager a few months ago and they were complaining the Wipro wanted to raise their rates for Business Analysts to over $100/hr. Mind you the worker isn't going to see most of that money.

The current bill in the senate that has bi-partisan support entirely removes all H1-B visa caps. It's the nuclear option more or less for American Tech workers.

Comment: Re:Buy american only. (Score 2) 108 108

My experiences with IBM is you get a couple true blue IBM guys that act as front men that go to meetings while the real work is done by off-shore workers. Sometimes the offshore folks are IBM, but a lot of the time they are someone IBM has contracted to do the work. Which is why increasingly American companies have been dumping IBM and cutting deals directly with the offshore companies. Why pay IBM to be a middle-man? It's unclear to me exactly what value IBM brings in China outside a name to make executives and investors feel like good decisions are being made. Maybe that's enough.

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