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Comment: Re:Why do these reaction wheels keep failing? (Score 1) 27

by K. S. Kyosuke (#48638705) Attached to: Kepler Makes First Exoplanet Discovery After Mission Reboot
All you're saying is true, but I think we've had enough problems with space-based moving parts (the assorted reaction wheels, Voyager 1 and 2 scan platforms etc.) compared to non-moving parts that finding a reasonable solution to this problem seems like something that everyone could benefit from. If a number of long-distance scientific missions have all the components working with the exception of moving parts, it would appear that moving parts with long lifetimes are the next major problem to solve. Voyagers had problems early on. That made the scientific output from Voyager 2 diminished even before it got to Uranus and Neptune. It's not just about extended missions in some cases.

Comment: Re:Why do these reaction wheels keep failing? (Score 1) 27

by K. S. Kyosuke (#48638233) Attached to: Kepler Makes First Exoplanet Discovery After Mission Reboot
For these missions, though, it's generally desirable for the vehicle to last as much as you can make it. Surely the average scientific return per day from Opportunity is much, much cheaper now that it's been operating for ten years than it would have been had it only worked for the originally planned ninety days.

+ - FBI confirms open investigation into Gamergate->

Submitted by v3rgEz
v3rgEz (125380) writes "In a terse form letter responding to a FOIA request, the FBI has confirmed it has an open investigation into Gamergate, the loose but controversial coalition of gamers calling for ethics in gaming journalism — even as some members have harassed and sent death threats to female gaming developers and critics"
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Avesome (Score 1) 56

by K. S. Kyosuke (#48630581) Attached to: India Successfully Test Fires Its Heaviest Rocket
You can't conjure the "kinetic energy of a small nuke" out of thin air - the launch vehicle has to provide it. Even with this rocket, you won't get more than ~40 tons of TNT equivalent per launch. That's a tiny nuke. And that's before accounting for atmospheric losses. And forget ground blasts (or low altitude airbursts), not gonna happen with such small masses. Not to mention how awfully impractical such a weapon would be from an operational perspective (target choice, attack timing etc.)

Comment: Re:Sour grapes anyone? (Score 1) 56

by K. S. Kyosuke (#48630241) Attached to: India Successfully Test Fires Its Heaviest Rocket

You used the word 'ripoff'

I did, because it's an accurate description of Vikas. The US equivalent of Indians adopting Vikas would be the US flying to the Moon with the V-2 engine - which obviously didn't happen. The Indian equivalent of replicating the US post-war engine development would be Indians letting French guys immigrate and develop a much improved new engine on Indian salary - which didn't happen either. That's why I considered the topic digression to post-war US completely inconsequential. Their new CE-20 engine is fully domestic, though - although that's exactly the one that hasn't flown yet. Which is unfortunate, because it seems really nice, I'll give them that. If it's cheap enough, it could become a real workhorse for ISRO.

We don't know who it was that discovered water, but we're pretty sure that it wasn't a fish. -- Marshall McLuhan

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