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Submission + - 34,000-Year-Old Organisms Found Buried Alive ( 1

cold fjord writes: A scientist has made a weird and and wonderful find:

It's a tale that has all the trappings of a cult 1960s sci-fi movie: Scientists bring back ancient salt crystals, dug up from deep below Death Valley for climate research. The sparkling crystals are carefully packed away until, years later, a young, unknown researcher takes a second look at the 34,000-year-old crystals and discovers, trapped inside, something strange. Something ... alive.

The Geological Society of America's current issue of GSA Today has the hard science paper.


Submission + - Are cars the next hacking frontier? (

thecarchik writes: Is it time for firewalls and malware protection for your car? Earlier this year we reported on research from the University of Washington and the University of California, San Diego, that showed how researchers were able to break into vehicle networks or change features—in some cases, while the vehicle was in motion. In the United States, the federally-mandated On-Board Diagnostics port, under the dash in virtually all modern vehicles, provides direct and standard access to internal automotive networks . Safety-critical systems (such as stability control or engine control) actually haven't been isolated from non-safety-critical systems (such as entertainment systems).

Submission + - Researchers Cripple Pushdo Botnet (

Trailrunner7 writes: Researchers have made a huge dent in the Pushdo botnet, virtually crippling the network by working with hosting providers to take down about two thirds of the command-and-control servers involved in the botnet. Pushdo for years has been one of the major producers of spam and other malicious activity, and researchers have been monitoring the botnet and looking for ways to do some damage to it since at least 2007. Now, researchers at Last Line of Defense, a security intelligence firm, have made some serious progress in crushing the botnet's spam operations.

After doing an analysis of Pushdo's command-and-control infrastructure, the researchers identified about 30 servers that were serving as C&C machines for the botnet. Working with the hosting providers who maintained the servers in question, the LLOD researchers were able to get 20 of the C&C servers taken offline, the company said.


Submission + - Robot Vans Drive, Driverless, from Italy to China (

kkleiner writes: The VisLab Intercontinental Autonomous Challenge is an epic autonomous road trip from Italy to China. Four (mostly) driverless vans are navigating the streets of Moscow, across Siberia and the Gobi Desert, and into Shanghai in time for the World Fair. The three-month, 8,000 mile venture is electric-powered, robot-steered, and a massive step forward for the field of autonomous driving technology. The team is halfway through their trip, and is currently in Eastern Europe.

Submission + - An iPhone App Store that Apple Doesn't Control (

waderoush writes: Princeton's Ed Felten has criticized the iPhone and iPad as Disneyland-like 'walled gardens' and says there's no way the iTunes App Store can 'offer the scope and variety of apps that a less controlled environment can provide.' Now there's a central marketplace where developers can sell iPhone-optimized apps without going through Apple's gatekeepers. Launched today, it's called OpenAppMkt and it's a showcase for mobile Web apps---not just the type seen back in 2007-2008, before the advent of the App Store, but also for new games and other apps developed using HTML5/CSS/JavaScript (in some cases, the same apps compiled and sold as native iPhone apps). Xconomy has a behind-the-scenes interview with OpenAppMkt's creators, who say they're not out to compete with the native App Store, but that developers deserve new ways to reach users.

Submission + - 6 Brain Sensors You'll Be Using Soon (

D1gital_Prob3 writes: Brain Computer Interface (BCI) ...a technology that creates a direct connection from our brains to our computers- is beginning to reach the market via toys and game controllers. In the process, these thought-controlled sensors are inspiring innovations that, for instance, allow you to call someone on your phone by simply thinking about them.

Submission + - 1-in-1,000 Chance of Asteroid Impact in... 2182? (

astroengine writes: "Sure, we're looking 172 years into the future, but an international collaboration of scientists have developed two mathematical models to help predict when a potentially hazardous asteroid (or PHA) may hit us, not in this century, but the next. The rationale is that to stand any hope in deflecting a civilization-ending or extinction-level impact, we need as much time as possible to deal with the threatening space rock. (Asteroid deflection can be a time-consuming venture, after all.) Enter "(101955) 1999 RQ36" — an Apollo class, Earth-crossing, 500 meter-wide space rock. The prediction is that 1999 RQ36 has a 1-in-1,000 chance of hitting us in the future, and according to one of the study's scientists María Eugenia Sansaturio, half of those odds fall squarely on the year 2182. But will mankind bother getting too flustered about it? Probably not."

Submission + - Largest vertical wind generator announced today (

baosol writes: Just when you thought the dust was settling on the best wind turbine design, the stakes have gotten higher, or in this case, wider. A new design called the Aerogenerator X ('X'to make it sound cooler?) would have a massive span of 275 meters and would produce a whoppingten megawatts of electricity that isthree times the production capacity of typical modern commercial horizontal axis turbines. The innovative design is compared to a sycamore leaf because it rotates horizontally on an offshore platform base, and it responds to the financial and technological limitations of scaling current three blade horizontal axis turbines for off-shore applications.

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