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Comment: Re:The big thing that is missing (Score 1) 631

by Jumunquo (#49143351) Attached to: FCC Approves Net Neutrality Rules

What do you mean unrealized? Netflix already got ransomed, and they paid the ransom. The whole fast lane proposal they were trying to get through the FCC was so they could do more of that more easily. The only part unrealized is the part where they charge you specifically more for Netflix access - which they deemed unnecessary because it was easier to just raise your monthly rate, set bandwidth caps fairly low, and then upsell you on an even more expensive plan, but the double charge of you and the website - that's realized.

Comment: Re: nice, now for the real fight (Score 1) 631

by Jumunquo (#49143219) Attached to: FCC Approves Net Neutrality Rules

AOL sucked, but they were totally legit. They competed fairly and went down fairly. They didn't sneakily throttle your service, sue competitors, get laws passed to block competition, nor ransom high-bandwidth websites that were supposed to be part of your monthly service. Today's big ISPs are a totally different story, and most people didn't really paid attention until they asked for fast lines.

Comment: Re: nice, now for the real fight (Score 1) 631

by Jumunquo (#49142675) Attached to: FCC Approves Net Neutrality Rules

I think you are confusing regulating greed with eliminating greed.

Systems like communism that rely on eliminating greed don't work. Systems like capitalism that regulate greed by allowing smart greedy work to rewarded within the confines of the system (and update the rules of the system when necessary) work just fine.

Comment: Re: nice, now for the real fight (Score 2) 631

by Jumunquo (#49142477) Attached to: FCC Approves Net Neutrality Rules

A lot has changed since 1998. Just look at yourself - you're reading news on the Internet instead of a print newspaper or TV. The amount that people communicate on the Internet and the amount of content they watch is on a whole different level than it was back then. Smartphones are a big part of this change. If there's a community w/o Internet, people worry about how that community is getting behind.

Comment: Re: nice, now for the real fight (Score 2) 631

by Jumunquo (#49142173) Attached to: FCC Approves Net Neutrality Rules

Well, Comcast sued in the past too when FCC directed them not to mess w/ traffic, so they can't really blame Verizon. However, the Open Internet rules that Verizon was challenging is one that Comcast agreed to abide by for 7 years from the time of the MSNBC merger, so they probably just didn't want their competitors to get the jump on them.

Comment: Re:nice, now for the real fight (Score 2) 631

by Jumunquo (#49141987) Attached to: FCC Approves Net Neutrality Rules

Actually, in Google's letter to the FCC, one of the reasons they support classifying ISPs as an utility is because it gives them equal access to utility poles to run their lines. Although hundreds of ISPs doesn't make sense, there is certainly space for more similar to the cellular space, if the rules weren't so bent in favor of the near monopolies. So like you, I support the decision, but the way I view it differs a little.

Comment: Only used it when they paid me (Score 5, Insightful) 186

by Jumunquo (#49115891) Attached to: Google Teams Up With 3 Wireless Carriers To Combat Apple Pay

Last year, Softcard bribed me - cash, Amazon gift cards, etc. to use their service.
This year, they stopped, and I went back to swiping my credit card.

The problem is that Softcard payment requires more steps than you think:
1) Unlock phone
2) Open app
3) Type in 4-digit pin (why can't I use my fingerprint?)
4) Tap
Also, the tap is not as easy as you think. The first time you do it like the video, it probably won't work. On my S5, the sweet spot is actually in the middle of the phone horizontally across middle of NFC reader, and once I figured that out, I usually succeeded on the first try. However, some card readers just suck and will frequently require multiple tries. Rite Aid card readers, before they stopped accepting it, were the most likely to have this problem (and it was always the same ones at particular registers that gave me trouble).

The way it SHOULD work is that I put my phone over the NFC reader, it asks me for fingerprint, and done. Reality bites.

Refreshed by a brief blackout, I got to my feet and went next door. -- Martin Amis, _Money_

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