Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Homeless for 6 year or 30 years (Score 1) 318

The article says he has been homeless for 6 years and recently feel on hard times due to a loss of his wife and mother turning to alcohalism.

However this video from the same project says that he has been on the streets for 30 years. (21 seconds in)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v...

The story doesn't jive.

Comment: Re:FYI: that wooshing sound you hear... (Score 1) 151

by JumperCable (#42665587) Attached to: Microsoft May Invest $1B-$3B In Dell Buyout

Not necessarily a fair assessment. The linux boxes & no-OS boxes were priced higher than the same builds WITH Windows pre-installed. Why on earth would I pay more money when I can wipe Windows off of a machine in the blink of an eye.

The problem wasn't Linux. It was the pricing scheme.

Comment: Re:Good (Score 1) 432

by JumperCable (#40992475) Attached to: Ecuador To Grant Assange Political Asylum

I would have rated you funny. Honestly, you don't have to reach out from some grand governmental conspiracy to explain what is going on.

Assange was staying at one woman's house, banged her, then while still using her place as home base, goes out and bangs some other fan-girl. Fan-girl unwittingly contacts the woman who Assange was staying with trying to get in touch with him. The feminist hostess puts two and two together, gets pissed and decides to extract her pound of flesh for revenge. Takes it to the police to see if they can force him to take an STD test. Then it hits the media and all hell breaks loose. Now everyone is scrambling to try to save face. It gets picked up by a prosecutor attempting to make a name for himself in feminist circles and to continues to snowball. Now the only way to save face is if someone at minimum gets legally slapped on the wrist for bad behavior. For Assange & his supporters it is far easier to blame some grand governmental conspiracy than to deal with the accusations being leveled at him.

You don't need some grand governmental conspiracy to explain what is going on. A better explanation is that everyone here is acting in their own self interest, except for the poor fan-girl who got unwittingly drug into this mess.

All of this and the US government didn't have to lift a finger. They have done the best thing possible, which is to sit back, do nothing, break out the popcorn, let people hang themselves and enjoy.

Comment: Because I don't putz with my distro (Score 1) 818

by JumperCable (#40284387) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Why Aren't You Running KDE?

Because I don't want to spend all day tweaking my distro everytime I upgrade to a new one. I grab an all-in-one complete distro that works out of the box (at this point it is Mint Linux). And I am done. I honestly don't want to spend all day reconfiguring every aspect of it. I am to the point where I am going to start skipping the 6 month revisions and stick with the Long Term Support versions. And I will more than happily skip over any version that is reported to be buggy or poorly designed. I want something that just works.

Comment: Keep work & personal life separate (Score 1) 391

by JumperCable (#39652497) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: My Company Wants Me To Astroturf, Should I?

My company's marketing department also asked all of the employees to facebook 'like' the company & post comments about the company. There were not any managers pushing this down on the employees. I won't touch it with a 10 foot pole. My rule is to not discuss my company on the internet that is in any what that is identifiable to my company or myself. Once you cross the line of mixing work with your personal life you are walking into a mine field. The best case scenario is that no one cares that you did it. The worst case scenario is that people start looking at your personal internet life and find something objectionable that you have said, or some strangers on the internet decide they don't like what you said and try to get you fired from your company, or you make some off hand comment about a coworker, company or work situation that lands you in hot water. It just isn't worth it.

Comment: Re:Does that include cost of training and transiti (Score 1) 370

by JumperCable (#39504615) Attached to: Munich Has Saved €4M So Far After Switch To Linux

Not all corporate computer training sucks. Not all of them are power point flip throughs.

The kind I consider the most effective are the ones where everyone has a computer in front of them and go through step by step exercises with sufficient time allowed for people to actually complete the provided task. They also provide a class book that shows the exercise step by step so that when they are done with the class, they can take the book and repeat the exercises back at their desk.

Even from a support position, I saw value in attending some of those classes just so I would know what the users have been taught and are reasonably expected to know.

Comment: cheat, steal, and even disobey traffic laws (Score 1) 1040

by JumperCable (#39178745) Attached to: Are Rich People Less Moral?

The rich are more likely to cheat, steal, and even disobey traffic laws than those with less money and power

Disobeying traffic laws is a no brainer. They can better afford the ticket and insurance rate hikes.

Cheating & stealing? They can afford better legal representation so are less likely to be punished if they do get caught.

Comment: First End-to-End Record of a Full Anonymous Attack (Score 1) 355

by JumperCable (#39177139) Attached to: Vatican Attack Provides Insight Into Anonymous

and may be the first end-to-end record of a full Anonymous attack.

They act as if tracking Anonymous is any difficultly at all. The group is highly transparent. Finding them and following them on specific issues or OPS is not difficult at all. All you need is an strong interest in the subject matter, plenty of time on your hands, and a huge bucket of popcorn.

Comment: Re:Why? (Score 1) 355

by JumperCable (#39177029) Attached to: Vatican Attack Provides Insight Into Anonymous

The abuse scandal was a pattern of abuse and cover-up that exploded into the media spotlight in the late 80s/early 90s. The Church did wrong, but since then, they've done a lot of right

It depends on which country. Check in with Ireland. There is at least one other African country that I can think of off the top of my head that still has issues. They only do a lot right when the media pressure and legal battles becomes too high to just sweep it under the rug.

"But this one goes to eleven." -- Nigel Tufnel

Working...