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Comment Seafile (Score 4, Informative) 200

I've found Seafile to be quite good and reliable. It's a multiplatform, free software, self-hosted Dropbox alternative that provides file syncing, sharing, a web interface, and tools for team work. Libraries can be encrypted server-side.
I use it for several months now and it is both fast and reliable (much more than the owncloud versions I tested previously). It handles my whole pictures collection (about 90GB) very easily. You can install your own Seafile server (there's even a raspberry pi version), or buy storage space from them. Clients are multiplatform (Windows, Mac, Linux, Android, iPhone/iPad).

Submission + - White Dwarfs gravitational waves found ( 2

Dupple writes: Researchers have spotted visible-light evidence for one of astronomy's most elusive targets — gravitational waves — in the orbit of a pair of dead stars.

Until now, these ripples in space-time, first predicted by Einstein, have only been inferred from radio-wave sources.

But a change in the orbits of two white dwarf stars orbiting one another 3,000 light-years away is further proof of the waves that can literally be seen.


Submission + - Kleii is the Asian Dropbox for cross-platform cloud storage and music streaming (

An anonymous reader writes: With the cloud computing industry expected to generate US$1.1 trillion annual business revenues by 2015, multiple cloud storage and sharing services are being created around the world, all vying to be the top service provider for consumers and enterprises. Western companies such as Dropbox and Box are pitched against their Asian counterparts such as Insync, which positions themselves as the Google Drive for power and business users, and iTwin, who claims to be the secure Dropbox.

Submission + - Google Launches Public DNS Resolver (

AdmiralXyz writes: Google has announced the launch of their free DNS resolution service, called Google Public DNS. According to their blog post, Google Public DNS uses continuous record prefetching to avoid cache misses- hopefully making the service faster- and implements a variety of techniques to block spoofing attempts. They also say that (unlike an increasing number of ISPs), Google Public DNS behaves exactly according to the DNS standard, and will not redirect you to advertising in the event of a failed lookup. Very cool, but of course there are questions about Google's true motivations behind knowing every site you visit...

And on the seventh day, He exited from append mode.