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Comment: Re:Time for the mega screens (Score 1) 164

by Joosy (#49162401) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Whiteboard Substitutes For Distributed Teams?

The problem may be that the mega screens are (from what I've seen) video quality, and thus crazy expensive.

Nope. The cost of the display itself pales compared next to the cost of the digitizer.

Then same argument, different component: use digitizers with lower resolution to bring the cost down. You don't need smart-phone or Wacom quality for a whiteboard.

Comment: Re:Time for the mega screens (Score 1) 164

by Joosy (#49157363) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Whiteboard Substitutes For Distributed Teams?

I'm waiting for whiteboard sized touch screens to make their appearance. I know Microsoft was working on this a couple of years back.

No you aren't. You're waiting for them to come down from astronomical prices. You can get them now.

The problem may be that the mega screens are (from what I've seen) video quality, and thus crazy expensive. What's needed for simple whiteboarding, with the equivalent of dry erase "markers" for drawing, could be much lower in resolution and be limited to 256 colors. I really just want to be able to do what I can on a real whiteboard: draw some flow charts and diagrams, write text visible across the room and erase what needs to be changed.

Bonus for the digital version would be some straightforward copy/pasting (ie, move part of a diagram to a different place on the board), recording, and, of course, the remote collaboration aspect. (Any solution that involves a camera aimed at a real whiteboard is going to fail the "remote collaboration" aspect.)

In short, the video and audio conferencing stuff has already been solved, as has document sharing. So let that run in parallel on different systems and just solve the shared whiteboard problem.

Comment: Re:Messaging problem hiding as a whiteboard proble (Score 1) 164

by Joosy (#49157343) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Whiteboard Substitutes For Distributed Teams?

That's why no digital whiteboard will ever beat the real thing

I don't see any reasonable person claiming this. But if your team could use a quick session with another team that's 1000+ miles away, having a functional shared whiteboard is better than 1) taking three days for one team to fly back and forth, or, 2) not meeting at all because there's no point unless they can see the other team's facial tics.

Comment: Re:That clinches it. (Score 2) 393

by Joosy (#49071503) Attached to: PC-BSD: Set For Serious Growth?

now you can download something like Linux Mint and be up and running ... faster than you can with most Windows systems

I can't count how many times I've read this same comment. And it is true, but do you really think the reason someone picks an operating system is because they can save a few minutes when they first install it? What I think would be most frustrating for end users is installing and updating software. For some apps that can be a nightmare.

Comment: Radio and TV announcers voices (Score 1) 790

by Joosy (#48785983) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Sounds We Don't Hear Any More?

In old newsreels (1930's) and old time radio, the announcer's voices were either stentorian and over the top (news) or ultra smooth (radio hosts).

In the 1970's the UHF stations would have the most horribly produced local ads ... "I'M CRAZY HENRY HAVING A BLOW OUT SALE! COME ON DOWN BEFORE THEY TAKE ME AWAYYYYY!!!"

Comment: Re:Irresponsible parents are part of the problem h (Score 2) 137

by Joosy (#47391971) Attached to: Amazon Fighting FTC Over In-App Purchases Fine

We didn't give our son a credit card. We didn't give him a cell phone. We gave him a Kindle Fire HD, and had no idea that by default he would be able to buy things with real money without our needing to put our password in.

After getting a huge charge from in app purchases I complained to Amazon and was immediately and cheerfully given a refund, with instructions for how to turn on the setting to require password for in app purchases.

Amazon knew what it was doing when they made the default setting "no password required for in app purchases". I'd be happy to see them get a massive fine for that greedy and disgusting decision.

Comment: Yes, purchase was refunded, but ... (Score 1) 137

by Joosy (#47391955) Attached to: Amazon Fighting FTC Over In-App Purchases Fine

"when customers told us their kids had made purchases they didn't want, we refunded those purchases."

True, at least in our case.

Still, I could have done without the shock of seeing the huge charge (over $200 ... more than the cost of the Kindle Fire HD!) ... our 8-year old could have done without the stress of having his parents mad at him when he didn't realize he wasn't doing anything wrong ... I could have done without having to spend time getting a refund.

And what about those who didn't jump through the hoops to get their refund?

So, screw Amazon. Throw the book at them.

Comment: Better form factor! (Score 1) 427

by Joosy (#47320183) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Would It Take For You To Buy a Smartwatch?

Smart watch designers have to let go of their idea that it has to look like a watch. It's like the early years of automobiles, where cars were designed to look like carriages without the horse, or vegetarian food in the 1950's and 1960's which had to look like meat.

I want something long and more or less rectangular that wraps partly around my arm, starting from the wrist and going maybe halfway up the forearm up to the elbow. This would allow me to read text messages or notifications without having to squint at something tiny. It would open things up to a huge market for apps that just don't work on something about 1" across. It would allow me - eventually, once they were touchscreens - to press buttons or even type with one hand. And it would open up a huge market for digital tattoo "screensavers".

Comment: Re:The Good Old Days! (Score 1) 522

It's more than just not having your hands leave the keyboard ... it's being able to navigate without moving your hands from the home position.. You can go forward a word with ctrl-f and back a word with ctrl-a, and up and down with ctrl-e and ctrl-x. (Nowadays you also need to remap the control key to be left of the A key where God intended it to be.)

Most modern word processors force you to lift your right hand and move it over to the arrow keys to navigate ... It's true that many word processors can be configured to do the Wordstar diamond, but it can be a pain, and if it's not that way out of the box new users will never know about it, never learn it, and go on using the horribly inefficient arrow keys or even (shudder) the mouse.

Comment: Re:Warning! - Socialism ahead. (Score 1) 732

by Joosy (#45962439) Attached to: If I Had a Hammer

The question is, what happens when literally everything of economic value that a person is capable of doing, can be accomplish more efficiently by a machine?

From a Woody Allen standup routine in the early 1960's:

My father worked for the same firm for twelve years. They fired him. They replaced him with a tiny gadget - this big - that does everything my father does, only it does it much better. The depressing thing is, my mother ran out and bought one.

10 to the 6th power Bicycles = 2 megacycles

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