Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment Excellent idea (Score 1) 552 552

But let's not apply it too narrowly. The top 2%-5% in a *lot* of fields are substantially better than the next 10%. I see a lot of people here complaining about H1B abuses, and I agree that's real, but I think that attracting the top 5% would broaden opportunities for everyone. The catch is to do it in a way that aligns the incentives with the objectives, and I think there's a simple way to accomplish that:

Any company that pays an H1B employee at or above the 95th salary percentile for *domestic* labor can have an H1B that doesn't count against the annual visa quota. At least five American workers in the same band at the same company have to certify under penalty of perjury that the band level for the job is appropriately selected. That way the incentives match the objectives.

Folks: losing your job to an underpaid foreigner who is basically getting treated as slave labor is bad for both of you. Bringing in people who will open up opportunities to create new products or manage new groups is one way to stimulate demand. If they have to be *paid* at the 95th percentile, they won't get brought in willy-nilly.

Oh. Requiring those certifications would also put a fast end to the "captive Indian contracting company" practice, and would save a lot of visiting workers from slave trade types of abuses.

Image

The World's Smallest Legible Font 280 280

hasanabbas1987 writes "From the article: 'Well 'technically' they aren't the smallest fonts in the world as if they were you wouldn't be able to read even a single letter, but, you should be able to read the entire paragraph in the picture given above... we did. A Computer science professor called Ken Perlin designed these tiny fonts and you can fit 500 reasonable words in a resolution of 320 x 240 space. There are at the moment the smallest legible fonts in the world.'"
Image

Google Street View Shoots the Same Woman 43 Times 106 106

Geoffrey.landis writes "Terry Southgate discovered that his wife Wendy appears on the Google Street View of his neighborhood not once or twice but a whopping 43 times. From the article: 'It seems as if the Street View car simply followed the same route as Wendy and Trixie. However, Wendy was a little suspicious that the car was doing something on the "tricksie" side. Several of the Street View shots show Wendy looking with some concern towards the car that was, well, to put it politely, crawling along the curb. "I didn't know what it was doing. It was just driving round very, very slowly," Wendy told the Sun.' The next best thing to being a movie star — a Street View star!"

Nothing is more admirable than the fortitude with which millionaires tolerate the disadvantages of their wealth. -- Nero Wolfe

Working...