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Comment: Re: This has forced the company to indefinitely su (Score 4, Interesting) 185

by Jon_E (#44422899) Attached to: Thailand Government Declares Bitcoin Illegal

That would be the Bitcoin Co Ltd exchange (https://bitcoin.co.th/) .. that's having issues with the Bank of Thailand (Thailand's central/reserve bank) ..bahtcoin is still open for the moment

This appears to be ramping up - last month bitspend had it's accounts frozen from Chase citing potential money laundering, and new allegations of ponzi schemes are making all the federal regulators nervous - as they should be

Comment: Re:Effect on Carbon dating? (Score 1) 344

by Jon_E (#40225739) Attached to: What Struck Earth in 775?

(somewhat paraphrased conversation between CS Lewis and JRR Tolkein relayed by Humphrey Carpenter that I like)

CS Lewis: "Myths are lies and therefore worthless, even though breathed through silver."
JRR Tolkein: "They are not lies. Far from being lies they were the best way — sometimes the only way — of conveying truths that would otherwise remain inexpressible. We have come from God, and inevitably the myths woven by us, though they contain error, reflect a splintered fragment of the true light, the eternal truth that is with God. Myths may be misguided, but they steer however shakily toward the true harbor, whereas materialistic "progress" leads only to the abyss and the power of evil."

anyhow - read Joseph Pearce's article on the conversation and back story .. quite interesting .. http://catholiceducation.org/articles/arts/al0107.html

Comment: Re:Effect on Carbon dating? (Score 1) 344

by Jon_E (#40225573) Attached to: What Struck Earth in 775?

too lazy to login .. don't slash dots much anymore these days

actually thinking about this more .. what really throws radiocarbon dating off now (IIUC) is the nuclear testing and bombs that were dropped to end WWII - who's to say that previous civilizations didn't reach similar states in the past and perhaps wipe themselves out? Atlantis anyone?

the overall point being that every belief system has some degree of "evidence" and there's always some amount of faith involved in accepting said "evidence" and there's still a lot that we don't know.

Comment: Re:Let's look at that, okay? (Score 3, Interesting) 331

It has to do with honesty and the perception that the person you're talking to has your best interest at heart. People are generally pretty good at smelling a rat, and if your engineer is in the same boat as your customer - then there's a trust that's there that's generally pretty easy to work with. The problem breaks down if the engineer or sales person doesn't have a broader view of the coming problems, or architecture changes that might be necessary as this typically comes from pure experience.

Working for a large consulting arm of a large (now mostly defunct) technical company .. we really turned a corner when we convinced our mgmt that it was bad practice to always have to recommend our companies products - particularly when there were better products out there .. this also enabled us to work more closely with the backline engineers to either make things better, or eliminate dead weight. Honesty can go a long way in developing trust, and can help you either really believe in your product or take you to the place where you can help others understand what needs to be done for customers to believe in your product.

Comment: Re:Followup question... (Score 1) 253

by Jon_E (#32768418) Attached to: Best Format For OS X and Linux HDD?

of course you could also just cross-mount NFS, or setup a central networked fileserver .. as network begins to surpass native FC speeds - it's not a bad option (but needs a bit of tuning, care and feeding)

I played a bit with zfs-fuse too for doing this sort of thing (along with native zfs on opensolaris), but with a stall in cross platform development here i ended up upgrading my pools and obsoleting the fuse versions .. (note: also a bit tricky given the panic on detach model)

Comment: Re:I feel sorry (Score 1) 392

by Jon_E (#31687994) Attached to: Solaris No Longer Free As In Beer

The real thing missing that Solaris engineers took pretty seriously at a time (IMHO) is kernel panics and kernel debugging. Shapiro and Cantrill's work on mdb (and later DTrace) was huge at helping developers prove or identify key behavioural (and philosophical) aspects of the kernel and develop fixes pretty quickly. It also helped to identify key parts of the kernel that could be stripped out to prevent the amount of bloat that's quickly creeping into linux

just a thought

Comment: Re:So fork it. (Score 1) 392

by Jon_E (#31687862) Attached to: Solaris No Longer Free As In Beer

I see Cantrill just updated this page yesterday .. it's still surprising to me that so many drivers that vendors open sourced for linux and worked with Sun to help develop or port are still closed .. I guess some of this just echoes from an earlier time before linux had some of the commercial vendor support and there was still a large amount of vendor FUD (and corporate FUD) around open sourcing some of your key underlying IP. After 12 years in the Sun bubble you really begin to see that innovation really comes from freedom and just a few talented developers (not armies) .. here's to hoping that Oracle doesn't stifle that freedom in the interest of improving Larry's boats.

Comment: Re:MySQL isn't nearly worth the losses Sun is taki (Score 1) 251

by Jon_E (#29833573) Attached to: Sun Microsystems To Cut 3,000 Jobs As Oracle Deal Drags On

I don't even know why Sun paid a billion for it in the first place.

easy .. to screw Oracle over (who was in turn screwing over their customers to turn more licensing revenue on CMT, HT, containers etc) .. if you look at statements McGnarly made just this past spring (before the IBM deal fell through) you'll find his references of Oracle as a cheap heroin dealer - which falls in line with their misguided tactic to try and take on the oracle empire .. of course now that they've accepted Larry's "drug money" - i don't understand why they don't just spin the whole thing off again .. unless they can't afford to, or there's no other tinkerbell investors who believe enough with their wallet ..

If Machiavelli were a hacker, he'd have worked for the CSSG. -- Phil Lapsley

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