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Comment: Re:Nope (Score 0) 217

by DigiShaman (#49163379) Attached to: Samsung Officially Unpacks Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge At MWC

Two things.

1: You're assuming that I'm conflating counterfeit with legitimate 3rd party.

2: I didn't know Anker (whom is a respectable brand) made cellphone batteries at such a price. Previously it was only pirated counterfeits sold anywhere from 12 - 14 dollars. But yes, there are a plethora of counterfeit OEM batteries passing themselves off as the real McCoy. The chemical composition and its purity is dubious at best. So when I said don't let that 12 buck burn a hole in your pocket, I literally meant it. :)

Comment: Re:Nope (Score 0) 217

by DigiShaman (#49162185) Attached to: Samsung Officially Unpacks Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge At MWC

Wow, what a colossal glittering jewel of ignorance the AC espouses! No, not all lithium batteries are the same. At best, a Samsung S4 battery will use a generic 1500mAh cell with filter material to fake a real one that's rated for 1800mAh. At worst, the actual cell is substandard quality in both materials and protection circuitry that leads to a run-away exothermic reaction; FIRE!

Comment: Re:Nope (Score -1, Troll) 217

by DigiShaman (#49161685) Attached to: Samsung Officially Unpacks Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge At MWC

You paid for, and trust a counterfeit battery?! Don't let that 12 bucks burn a hole in your pocket.

BTW, my phone isn't just for personal use, it's also business. When I need a working phone, I need one ASAP. As usual YMMV. For me, value is in turn-around time to resolution; be it replace or repair.

Comment: Re:Smoking Hot Blondes (Score 1) 203

by DigiShaman (#49160689) Attached to: Research Suggests That Saunas Help You Live Longer

Never been to sauna, but I want to try. I'm a texan, so we don't really have the environment for that being a warm gulf state. When I traveled to China, I did try the hot springs (Singapore design I think) while I detoxed with rice tea; more or less. But yes, you come out feeling like a million bucks. I only wish I could do it once a month or more often.

Comment: Re:Nope (Score 0) 217

by DigiShaman (#49160387) Attached to: Samsung Officially Unpacks Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge At MWC

See, that's why I get AppleCare. It's both insurance and covers battery failure too. Just walk right into an Apple store and often they will either replace the battery right then and there, or swap the phone within the hour. Restore from iCloud and done! To hell with those other cell replacement plans or insurance policies, AppleCare is the way to go.

Can I walk into a BestBuy or elsewhere and get the same level of service for a Samsung phone?

Comment: Dept of DUH (Score 1) 31

by DigiShaman (#49150187) Attached to: Simple IT Security Tactics for Small Businesses (Video)

IT 101 for SMB (or any business)

1. Get a business class Next-Generation firewall.
2. Don't install JRE or Flash if you can at all avoid it; they're vector for web drive-by-download malware
3. Installed managed AV for all workstations.
4. Block outbound port 25 (SMTP) so as to not be black-listed and fart SPAM from an infected machine to others out in the world.
5. Block TOR at FW level. Unfortunately. it's how bot-nets communicate these days.
6. Limit share access by department and roles.
7. Educate users of cons online.

Comment: Re:What it really reveals (Score 1) 112

by danheskett (#49134623) Attached to: TrueCrypt Audit Back On Track After Silence and Uncertainty

True, you didn't built everything from source, but you were happy enough that everything traced back to "the" sources to make you feel secure. That's a lot more protection than anything from a commercial vendor, who probably just sold you formulaic encryption without any extra work to make you feel secure. Your data would have been more secure, if not actually secure, but you'd have felt it less, because really you have no way of knowing. So without somebody taking the extra time to make you feel secure, you naturally wouldn't feel it very much, if at all.

The problem is that there is no conceivable way to do what you are saying. It involves compromising or proxying disparate traffic, expertly.

And then, after all that, it would involve rooting an otherwise secure installation that is barely network connected, and using that to inject what, defects into the right sources so that the resulting binaries are weak or exploitable?

I agree that the NSA, CIA, and FBI have extraordinary capabilities, but the attack vectors that have thus far been revealed are the same attack vectors that security researchers have known and published for a long time - firmware, obscure libraries that are often used but seldom examined, zero-day exploits of popular software, mathematical flaws in encryption implementations, and physical security and chain of custody.

All of which is to say, the basic landscape of the threat has not changed much in 20 years. It is sophisticated, but as always, a strong layered defense and strong procedures and policies will minimize the possible impacts, exploits, and severity of breaches (if they occur in the first place). There are few things more secure than a well maintained GNU/Linux or OpenBSD box running in the wild.

Comment: Re:Facts not in evidence (Score 1) 406

by daveschroeder (#49122177) Attached to: NSA Director Wants Legal Right To Snoop On Encrypted Data

Your (and my, and any individual citizen's) personal interpretation of the Constitution is not the measure. It is the interpretation and implementation by our three branches of government. I realize that some reading this believe they have all been compromised, or that they think some particular thing is "obviously unconstitutional" (even though the judicial, legislative, and executive branches say otherwise), but the fact is we have the system of government we have. So how about you consider the alternative: one where you don't assume that everyone working at every/any level of government, e.g., NSA, doesn't have the worst motivations and is actually trying to do their best to honorably, legally, and Constitutionally, protect our nation and its people instead of the opposite. How about that?

Comment: Re:Facts not in evidence (Score 1) 406

by daveschroeder (#49121915) Attached to: NSA Director Wants Legal Right To Snoop On Encrypted Data

If you would actually like to have a discussion, I am more than happy to engage. I have articulated these views (not on this specific topic, of course) long before I ever served in uniform, and they have nothing to do with a "paycheck" -- in fact, it's the inverse: the reason I chose to serve is because of my personal desire to do what I can to support things I believe in, and believe are important for our nation and my family and fellow citizens, not the other way around. Yes, our system of government is imperfect...grossly so -- but I choose to support it over any and all alternatives, warts and all. (And that is not to say that there are not things that cannot be improved.)

And again -- and I sincerely mean this -- if you are actually serious about engaging in a dialogue, I am happy to.

Comment: Re:Actually, ADM Rogers doesn't "want" that at all (Score 1, Flamebait) 406

by daveschroeder (#49121645) Attached to: NSA Director Wants Legal Right To Snoop On Encrypted Data

Yes, where to even begin...

Do you realize that over 70% of FOREIGN internet traffic enters, traverses, or otherwise touches the US?

Do you understand that an individualized warrant is required to target, collect, store, analyze, or disseminate the communications content of a US Person anywhere on the globe, and that the current law on the issue is stronger and more restrictive with regard to US Persons than it has ever been?

Do you understand that the FOREIGN communications we are going after are now intermixed with the communications of the rest of the world, including that of Americans?

Do you understand that when terrorists use Gmail, Facebook, Yahoo, WhatsApp, Hotmail, Twitter, Skype, etc. etc. etc., or Windows, or Dell computers, or Android phones, or Cisco routers, and so on, that there is no technical distinction between your communications and theirs, yet -- surprise -- we still would like to access those communications, and have legal, policy, and technical frameworks to do so, even if you have not personally inspected them yourself?

If you are a US citizen, and not covered by any warrant, no one cares about your communications. And almost by definition, no foreign intelligence agency (NSA, CIA, DIA) remotely gives a shit about your communications, and would greatly prefer to avoid it altogether, unless you have some kind of connection with foreign intelligence targets -- in which case any collection or monitoring of your communications would require an individualized warrant from FISC or another court of competent jurisdiction. I realize you think this isn't the case, and that all of your communications are being mined and monitored (illegally, no less), and since proving a negative is impossible, I won't be able to help in that regard.

C for yourself.

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