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Comment: Re:Build your own? (Score 1) 42

by JohnBailey (#39982991) Attached to: The FIBIAC — a 3D-Printed Electromechanical Computer

Sure, build your own. All you need is a 3D printer (required quality unknown), a laser cutter (no problem, I have two in the garage; snerk), CNC mill (also have a couple of these laying around), and who knows what else.

Simple, real simple.

Wow... So building stuff requires tools.. Who knew..

Comment: Re:Comment 21 (Score 1) 42

by JohnBailey (#39875615) Attached to: Sigrok: An Open Source Logic Analyzer

So, where are all the folks who complain there are not enough "tech" articles on /. anymore?? There are only 20 comments in this thread, and it's several hours old.

Posting comments on non tech articles about there not being enough tech articles. Pretty obvious really.

Realistically.. This is beyond the ability of many /. posters to understand. Let alone flame. and they haven't even got a brand to cheer for. So many will take a quick look at the summary, not understand a word of it, and go away again.

This is real tech.. Not consumer tech, like the latest iPhone rumours or who invented tablets.

+ - Data miners beware! AKA: The sheep revolt!

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Tired of being tracked, profiled, and/or spoon fed info because of your latest search or facebook like?

We need some sharp programmers to create a 'background' process/plug-in which will submit fake search/likes/tweets etc. to mess with the profiling of all our online actions.

Imagine the impact if [insert current pariah] had to deal with 20% randomised data? 50% randomised data? Hell, it could even be a TOR-like online anonymity system. Something where you can play WoW as yourself but your search for 'midget porn' is buried in the noise of a million other user's randomised searches."

Comment: Re:used or bust (Score 1) 423

by JohnBailey (#39755417) Attached to: If You Resell Your Used Games, the Terrorists Win

So... one might say that you were boycotting DRM games.

Yes.. In the same way one might say I have boycotted cigarettes for the best part of a year. I prefer to say I stopped smoking.

Boycott = deliberately and publicly having nothing to do with specific person or company. Can only work if activity is engaged in by large groups.

Quitting = rejecting the entire product line and all similar products. Works on an individual level.

Quitting DRM can be hard or not, depending on how much you have invested in consumer hostile media and devices...

Claiming nobody can quit however, is just the same self enabling co dependent bullshit that every smoker has used for decades...

Microsoft

+ - Are Microsoft Users Smarter than a 4-Year-Old?

Submitted by theodp
theodp (442580) writes "So, is Microsoft trying to insult its customers with an e-mail from the Microsoft Store offering 'Personal Training' on Windows Live Photo Gallery for $49-an-hour? After all, didn't Microsoft boast in an earlier ad campaign that Windows Live Photo Gallery was simple enough for I'm-a-PC-and-I'm-4-and-a-half Kylie to use? So, here's a have-you-stopped-beating-your-wife type question for Steve Ballmer and sidekick Kylie: Did Microsoft exaggerate Live Photo Gallery's ease-of-use in the 'Rookies' TV ad ('Windows Live Photo Gallery. It's That Easy'), or does Microsoft feel its users aren't smarter than a four-year-old?"

Comment: Re:incredibly bad move (Score 1) 231

by JohnBailey (#39683305) Attached to: Open-Source NVIDIA Driver Goes Stable On Linux

Way to go guys.. you've now given Nvidia massive disincentive to continue to do more work with their MODERN drivers.

But if they hadn't.. Would you have been able to post anything this whiny?

Moron...

Nvidia is not releasing drivers for gamers on Linux. Shocking I know. But this hasn't and most likely never will be why Nvidia releases Linux drivers.

Nvidia does however, create drivers for their high end workstation cards. Which are regularly used on Unix/Irix/Linux workstations. The consumer grade stuff is an offshoot of this. Not the other way around. They have already written the code for paying customers.. Why not tweak it a tiny bit and let everyone else benefit.

This is a low end get you working driver, that does not actually get used on high end graphics workstations So no change in incentive.

Comment: Re:Potential issues, regarding memory/cpu usage (Score 1) 50

by JohnBailey (#39116263) Attached to: Get a Glimpse At the Raspberry Pi Fedora Remix

Real embedded systems engineers talk about you behind your back if you waste a couple of KB. They will laugh at your face if you waste a couple of MB.

And real embedded systems engineers will not be using this board. So they are quite possibly laughing even more at the tit who can't tell a Micro controller from a computer.

Comment: Re:Why Apple is good (Score 1) 715

by JohnBailey (#38888287) Attached to: Apple Forcing IT Shops To 'Adapt Or Die'

Growing up in the 80's, almost everyone I knew that had a computer, had a C64. One friend had a TRS-80, and one other had a TI-99. The only place I ever saw an Apple II as a kid was in the classroom. It was archaic looking compared to the Commodore at the time.

I had a ZX81, and later a Spectrum. A friend had a Vic 20 for a while. My brother in law had a BBC right up to the early 90s. When he got an Apricot, and later a succession of PCs.

Another friend's dad had an Apple for business use. Not sure which one. And that was the first Apple I ever saw. Around 1982-3..
Fast forward a few years to 1989, and I played around with a Mac at a training site, where there was one Mac for playing with, and the PCs for serious work. Someone donated it I think.

I have yet to see my third Apple computer outside a shop.

Egotist: A person of low taste, more interested in himself than in me. -- Ambrose Bierce

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