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Comment: Re:Their service, their terms (Score 0, Troll) 319

by John Nowak (#30499852) Attached to: Verizon Defends Doubling of Early Termination Fee

They should need no license to use the "public" airwaves. The airwaves should be privately owned and traded just like land. The immorality of the state owning the airwaves does not justify the state threatening to destroy a private business if they do not act in the public good as it is perceived by some bureaucrats.

Comment: Re:Their service, their terms (Score 1) 319

by John Nowak (#30499836) Attached to: Verizon Defends Doubling of Early Termination Fee

The federal government gives money to (and takes money from) practically everyone. If that's your standard for judging if someone should be subject to force by the state, we'd all be slaves. The fact that the government gives out money to everyone makes it necessary to take that money whenever it is offered to you lest you lose out to a competitor that took it. If you don't want to be in this sort of moral quandary, have the state stop redistributing your wealth to everyone else.

The Internet

Enforced Ads Coming to Flash Video Players 397

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the advertising-ploy-to-rule-the-world dept.
Dominare writes "The BBC is reporting that Adobe is releasing new player software which will allow websites that use their Flash video player (such as YouTube) to force viewers to watch ads before the video they selected will play. 'But the big seller for Adobe is the ability to include in Flash movies so-called digital rights management (DRM) — allowing copyright holders to require the viewing of adverts, or restrict copying. "Adobe has created the first way for media companies to release video content, secure in the knowledge that advertising goes with it," James McQuivey, an analyst at Forrester Research said.' This seems to have been timed to coincide with Microsoft's release of their own competitor, Silverlight, to Adobe's dominance of online video."
Patents

Amazon Goes Web 2.0 Wild to Defend 1-Click Patent 77

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the no-really-it's-cool-when-we-do-it dept.
theodp writes "Six years ago, Jeff Bezos and Tim O'Reilly urged the masses to give-patent-reform-a-chance as Richard Stallman called for an Amazon boycott. On Monday, the pair will reunite to kick off O'Reilly's new Amazon-sponsored Web 2.0 Expo with A Conversation with Jeff Bezos. Be interesting if the conversation turned to Amazon's ongoing battle against an actor's effort to topple Bezos' 1-Click patent, which The Register notes included dumping 58 lbs. of paperwork on the patent examiner, including dozens of articles from the oh-so-Web-2.0 Wikipedia, which the USPTO had already deemed an un acceptable source of information ('From a legal point of view, a Wiki citation is toilet paper,' quipped patent expert Greg Aharonian)."
Intel

Intel's Single Thread Acceleration 182

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the sometimes-the-few-outweigh-the-needs-of-the-many dept.
SlinkySausage writes "Even though Intel is probably the industry's biggest proponent of multi-core computing and threaded programming, it today announced a single thread acceleration technology at IDF Beijing. Mobility chief Mooly Eden revealed a type of single-core overclocking built in to its upcoming Santa Rosa platform. It seems like a tacit admission from Intel that multi-threaded apps haven't caught up with the availability of multi-core CPUs. Intel also foreshadowed a major announcement tomorrow around Universal Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) — the replacement for BIOS that has so far only been used in Intel Macs. "We have been working with Microsoft," Intel hinted."
Privacy

Student Financial Aid Database Being Misused 182

Posted by kdawson
from the six-solicitations-per-day dept.
pin_gween writes "The Washington Post reports on the probable abuse of the National Student Loan Data System. The database was created in 1993 to help determine which students are eligible for financial aid. Students' Social Security numbers, e-mail addresses, phone numbers, birth dates, and loan balances are in the database. It contains 60 million student records and is covered by federal privacy laws. Advocates worry that businesses are trolling for marketing data they can use to bombard students with mass mailings or other solicitations. The department has spent over $650,000 in the past four years protecting the data. However, some senior education officials are advocating a temporary shutdown of access to the database until tighter security measures can be put in place."

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