Slashdot stories can be listened to in audio form via an RSS feed, as read by our own robotic overlord.

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Wow. This whole sorry clusterfuck sucks (Score 1) 342

by squiggleslash (#48633937) Attached to: FBI Confirms Open Investigation Into Gamergate

Most of the people I've seen speaking out against GG seem to be the politcally correct thought police

Or... the loudest voices against GG have been those targetted by GG, who by and large are people seen by GG to be Feminists and widely misrepresented as a thought police rather than people sharing concerns they have about sexism.

Comment: Re:harassment attribution (Score 2) 342

by squiggleslash (#48633881) Attached to: FBI Confirms Open Investigation Into Gamergate

You've just proven it's easy to convince yourself of something that's obviously not true simply by creating a narrative and tying some minor details into it.

Sarkeesian needs to screenshot a Twitter user who over the last few minutes is sending her death threats. She's getting notifications every few seconds from Twitter on her mobile device, presumably her phone. She knows how to make a screenshot on a computer, and it'll capture more tweets than the four or five you can typically see on a mobile phone, so she fires up a web browser, goes to the Twitter URL of the harasser who's still in the process of sending her death threats, hits Ctrl-PtSc, and then sends the screenshot somewhere.

Completely normal. Exactly what you'd expect someone to do (I know it's technically possible to take a screenshot on your phone, but (1) you won't get many tweets and (2) personally I don't actually know how to do it, if I were in the same situation I'd have to Google for the information.)

Your idiot evidence tries to make every element of this suspicious. They... *gasp* went to a PC they weren't logged into to make the screenshot. They *horror* didn't wait until the death threat stream had finished before making the screenshot, meaning some were coming in seconds before she took it! Because you've decided she must be making this up, you've had to invent a ridiculous narrative involving tablets and logging out of PCs that has Sarkeesian apparently unaware she can have two browsers on the PC that has a keyboard.

What's even more bizarre is you make these allegations while GamerGate simultaneously acknowledges that Sarkeesian does, actually, get death threats all the time. The GG "Anti-Harassment Patrol" even trumpeted it's "success" at finding a certain Brazillian journalist who is one source of anti-Sarkeesian death threats, and got terribly upset when Sarkeesian said "Yes, I know, I've already reported him" and spun it as "Sarkeesian refuses to report harasser we found!!!1!!"

GamerGate is about harassment. Stop trying to cover it up.

Comment: Re:Hardware keyboards not the issue with Blackberr (Score 1) 108

by squiggleslash (#48633733) Attached to: Review: The BlackBerry Classic Is One of the Best Phones of 2009

Android phone makers experimented with physical keyboards for a while, and lately seem to have decided to just issue the same bland iPhone-but-with-Android form factors and forget about being innovative in that area.

I hope BlackBerry stays relevent enough to undo that and get manufacturers looking at text input again. The current situation may suit many, but I see a 50/50 split between people who are happy with Swype-like text input, and people who really prefer the accuracy of physical push buttons. Me, I'm generally OK with the former, but want to have the latter to fall back on.

Comment: astroturf (Score 3, Insightful) 336

by Ungrounded Lightning (#48633483) Attached to: Colorado Sued By Neighboring States Over Legal Pot

As you can see, the moderation converged on a more proper +5 Insightful

  I've read the post carefully and it doesn't qualify as Flamebait IMHO. It states a controversial political opinion and thus invites a discussion, which may lead to flamage, but does not itself lead with a flame.

So this looks like someone who doesn't like the position trying to suppress it, by hitting it with the most plausible -1, in the hope that one more like-minded person will have mod points and get it suppressed before very many people see it. That works for "politically incorrect" subjects (such as criticisms of the "heat death of the Earth, everybody panic and suppress technology" interpretation of climate data), where a crowd of like-minded free speech haters are ready to suppress opposing opinions. But pro-pot doesn't appear to attract that much system-gaming opposition.

Right now it only takes two downmods to hide a non-anonymous itme. It seems to me that we have enough people willing to moderate that it's time to scale up the mod system, so a small astroturf operation can't shut down debate. Say: double it: Mods get 10 points, -2 hides, non-anynomous starts at +2, high-karma at +4, doulble everybody's current karma and readjust the cutpoints for bonuses, caps, and the like. That would mean it would take two moderators to suppress a anonymous post and four for authors willing to risk reputation. (It would also mean more work for those who are willing to moderate - but they might be more willing to spend a point if they had more to spend.)

Comment: Re:harassment attribution (Score 1) 342

by squiggleslash (#48633409) Attached to: FBI Confirms Open Investigation Into Gamergate

What's happening here is the standard (especially in GG) circle-j where GamerGaters theorize that something is a "false flag", then someone digs out some minor coincidence, KIA has a field day and declares that the case has been proven, and nobody there revisits the issue, usually genuinely shocked that anyone would disagree.

I'm _still_ arguing with people who think (or claim to think) that Nathan Grayson wrote anything at all as a result of his fling with "LW1" [the GamerGate term for their primary target, who isn't a journalist FWIW. The women herself has suffered enough harassment, so I'll subvert this term to actually avoid mentioning her by name respecting her wish she be kept out of it.] They read Grayson did, they've only listened to people who said he did, as far as they're concerned it's true, and no amount of "OK, point me at the articles he supposedly wrote" will change that. Given this is the original attempt to redefine GamerGate as an "ethics" campaign, something even this story has fallen for, that's a pretty bad thing.

Another example:

1. Eron Gjoni initially tried to post his revenge-ex "tell all" about "LW1", to the forums of Something Awful. SA deleted it immediately and banned Gjoni.
2. Gjoni shops around, finally finding 4chan tolerates it long enough to stir up support from various anti-women trolls (well, it's 4chan, of course they're trolls.) Yadayadayada Adam Baldwin yadayadayadayada front page of New York Times, article about GamerGate's harassment and death threat campaign.
3. Goons (SA's term for forum members) discussing the trainwreck on Something Awful's forums notice the New York Times is covering a controversy that started at... Something Awful and post words to the effect of "What started here ended up on the NYT!"

So what happened then? Well, GamerGate developed a consensus, immediately, without any evidence whatsoever beyond forgetting, somehow, that SA was where Gjoni started trying to destroy "LW1", that Something Awful was behind all the death threats and was making them to make GamerGate look bad.

Because that totally makes sense. One, out of context, forum comment, with no actual quotes from SA members organizing this shadow campaign.

I mention this because it's one case where you specifically see the mindset. Something is "proven" because it gets repeated within KIA enough that it becomes an unquestioned fact. This is how GG holds on to its useful idiots long enough for them to make idiots of themselves.

Comment: Gun practice teaches calm - biofeedback style. (Score 1) 532

by Ungrounded Lightning (#48631389) Attached to: Reaction To the Sony Hack Is 'Beyond the Realm of Stupid'

Have you seen people drive? Road rage? Now think many of these same people with guns.

Target range practice is a very powerful biofeedback mechanism for teaching the suppression of the production of adrenaline and of all symptoms of excitement. Aligning gun sights - a pair of visual targets separated by about the length of the gun barrel (inches, a foot, or several feet), aligning them with a target (at tens of feet), and holding the alignment, gives visibility to even microscopic tremors and movement. Getting the image right and stable means drastically suppressing this movement. Over a number of range sessions, this leads to learning how to be icy calm, as a reflex, in the midst of a very stressful environment (full of intermittent explosions, bright lights, acrid smells, and odd-temperature winds).

(The effect is extreme. It was discovered that good target shooters, thinking they were just controlling their breath, had actually learned to "stop their heartbeat" - compressing the time between the pairs of beats before and after firing a shot and doubling the time between beats during the trigger pull.)

The result is that, after just a few good sessions, this becomes imprinted. Even in a rage, putting your hand on a gun drops you into that icy calm state.

Comment: Re:Neville Chamberlin was not available for commen (Score 1) 212

by Rei (#48630561) Attached to: "Team America" Gets Post-Hack Yanking At Alamo Drafthouse, Too

Germany was spending far more on their military during that time than Britain was. If Britain and France had stepped in earlier, Germany would have been totally unprepared and the war would have ended quickly. Not to mention all of the horrors of the Holocaust that would have been prevented.

If Britain and France had managed to delay the war to "prepare" even more, say a few years, the Luftwaffe would have been dominated by jets, German ballistic missiles would have been longer range and more precise, and they might even have become a nuclear power. I really don't think this is the analogy you're looking for.

Comment: Re:Land of the fre (Score 1) 532

by Ungrounded Lightning (#48629431) Attached to: Reaction To the Sony Hack Is 'Beyond the Realm of Stupid'

Indeed, though antagonizing your opponents like that probably isn't going to help the cause.

There is no long a point in trying not antagonizing them. Pretty much anyone who is still actively lobbying against private ownership of guns is either ignoring the evidence, incapable of uncerstandng it, or has a hidden agenda (such as creating victim-rich zones for govenment or criminal activity).

These people are not going to be converted. Things are far enough long that we no longer need them as straw men to raise the bogus argumets to be knocked down with logic. (Those who can be convinced with logic are now mostly either convinced or subject to information shortage). But they remain useful as targets of ridicule, so those who are more interested in being with the in crowd than making smart decisions can be converted.

For those still uncertain on the issue: Do you want to reduce murder, rape, assault, robery, criminal victimization, and institutional suppression of minority groups? Or do you want to want to reduce gun possession? There is no longer any question: More guns mean less of all those things.

Comment: Re: This is not the problem (Score 1) 646

by Copid (#48627817) Attached to: Economists Say Newest AI Technology Destroys More Jobs Than It Creates
As somebody living in one of the expensive tech commute areas, I feel ya on the expensive house thing, but let's be realistic. Telling people, "Sure, I make a lot of money, but after I spend it on expensive things that you can't have like a house in a nice neighborhood and a car to commute with, you and I have about the same amount of money," is a bit tone deaf. It's like eating a hearty dinner and then saying to the guy eating scraps, "See, my plate is empty too. Solidarity!"

Comment: Re:Also... (Score 1) 125

by jfengel (#48627649) Attached to: Research Highlights How AI Sees and How It Knows What It's Looking At

Nothing wrong with being wrong with confidence. Sounds like the majority of humanity the majority of the time.

Oh, it definitely sounds like the majority of humanity the majority of the time. I just don't think it's one of our more admirable traits.

In our case, it's necessary, because we evolved with mediocre brains. I'd like to see our successors do better. They aren't yet, which is what this article is pointing out. This promising system isn't ready yet. It's just not wrong for the reasons that the GGP post thought.

Comment: Re:Never attribute to stupidity (Score 1) 532

by Rei (#48626209) Attached to: Reaction To the Sony Hack Is 'Beyond the Realm of Stupid'

Propaganda campaign by who? I think Singer needs to check his haughtiness at the door:

the ability to steal gossipy emails from a not-so-great protected computer network is not the same thing as being able to carry out physical, 9/11-style attacks in 18,000 locations simultaneously. I can't believe I'm saying this. I can't believe I have to say this."

Except, of course, for the fact that the prime suspect is the hand-picked hacker squad of the Hollywood-obsessed leader of a nuclear armed state with ICBMs, whose family's Hollywood obsession has gone to such extremes in the past as kidnapping filmmakers and forcing at them at gunpoint to make movies for them. I can't believe I'm saying this. I can't believe I have to say this.

Comment: Are You Joking? (Score 3, Interesting) 176

by eldavojohn (#48625017) Attached to: US Links North Korea To Sony Hacking

> It is not known how the US government has determined that North Korea is the culprit

Of course it's known. The same way they established that Iraq had chemical weapons. The method is known as "because we say so".

Are you joking? I thought it was well established that there were chemical weapons in Iraq we just only found weapons designed by us, built by Europeans in factories in Iraq. And therefore the US didn't trumpet their achievements. In the case of Iraqi chemical weapons, the US established that Iraq had chemical weapons not because they said so but because Western countries had all the receipts.

Old programmers never die, they just branch to a new address.

Working...