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Comment Re:Sad in a philosophical sense (Score 1) 84

For having so many small experiments and projects to maintain, a human presence is really not that much more effort compared to building robotic versions of each experiment. The human is also far more adaptable, able to repair and rebuild systems as needed.

Well, except that humans are pretty much stuck at the landing site. Mars has half the circumference of earth or about 20000 km, you can get the equivalent of the lunar rover and cover maybe 20 km before you have to turn back. Sure, the rovers are a snooze feast but we got several of them in different places. For the same reason it's not practical to repair them or return samples to base either, even if we had a man on Mars.

Comment Re:Not good for per core licencing (Score 1) 245

Server 2016 is going per core licencing which means less cores overclocked

Given the drive to eke every last bit of economy (both dollars and joules) out of commodity server hardware, I see two possible outcomes for that: either future versions of Windows will have to reduce their licensing costs in the multicore scenarios, or most software will get ported over to other operating systems whose licensing costs are lower. (I'd imagine the latter is more sensible, since paying to license a GUI-based OS seems silly when running server software on a headless machine in a data center, but far be it from me to second-guess the IT industry)

Comment Re:speculative execution etc. With 1024 cores ... (Score 1) 245

With 4096 otherwise idle cores, it can make sense to calculate 1,000 possible scenarios in parallel and then ignore the 999 options you didn't need.

Well, maybe from a strict minimize-time-to-result perspective, but if we're also trying to minimize power usage (and given the subject of this article, we presumably are), then I'm not sure you're going to get any kind of efficiency win by doing 1000 times the necessary number of computations and throwing away almost all of them.

Comment Re:Revoke it (Score 1) 31

And in *two whole years*, they should have been able to establish that it was validating malware.

Is the app in question actually malware, according to Apple's definition of the term?

Or to put it another way, how evil does an application have to be before it should be labelled as malware? Is there a formal policy on this posted anywhere?

Comment Re:Meaningless stats (Score 1) 93

Yes, but... what users are complaining about isn't really how "fair" it is from a CS perspective. What they really want to know is how they can say my video streaming is a lot more important than my bittorrent client and if there's CPU contention or IO contention or network contention just let the video take priority. Because usually somebody with a server has optimized the IO quite well for the use case with 100 streams and they're all equally important. That's usually not the case on the client, some things matter much, much more than others.

Comment Re:Because Reasons (Score 1) 364

Indeed, I've been looking at uMatrix (in combination with NoScript), and there's a lot to recommend it. As far as cookie management goes, however, it's not as fine-grained as what Firefox had. You can only enable/disable a site's ability to set cookies. You can't inspect/approve every single cookie request itself. Sometimes you can get a site to work by accepting certain cookies and denying all others. FF's facility let you do that.

Comment Re: Everyone's phone, DSL and copper (Score 1) 153

I still keep a landline for emergency, it's never failed in 40 years.

Of course, the flip side of that is that you're likely paying a significant monthly bill to keep that reliable land line active.

My building's two front-door call boxes were each using a land line for their call-up function, and they were costing the HOA $65/month each. I switched them over to VOIP, now they cost the HOA about 25 cents per month each (not including the $23/month DSL service, since we had that set up anyway for unrelated reasons).

Comment Re:What year is this? (Score 3, Informative) 153

It all depends on how far you are from the nearest central, 3-5 km out on basic ADSL is pretty crap. If you live close to the exchange or they've pulled fiber "close" and you get ADSL2 or VDSL you can get decent 10-50 Mbit. No doubt the growth is fiber though, here in Norway it's now 28% (+6%) fiber, 22% (-5%) DSL since last year.

Comment Re:Sigh. (Score 2) 153

Junk making the front page that talks to me like I don't already work in IT or understand how common household technologies work.

Who are you? I didn't understand how DSL worked until I read the article, now I do. (Well, probably not, but now I know more than I did)

Comment Re:Porsche != 'Luddite' (Score 1) 207

The only problem is that insurance is based on risk pools. This means that as people switch to self driving cars the risk pool for cars that people drive shrinks and by definition they are the most unsafe drivers compared to the autodrive cars. This will mean insurance will go up and move people will stop driving their cars for money reasons and the insurance will keep going up.

No, insurance goes up as risk goes up. Unless driving a car becomes much riskier due to the interaction with self-driving cars or there's a selection bias where the above average safe drivers switch to self-driving and the below average stay the cost should remain constant. There would be a cheaper alternative and many people would surely prefer it but it's not like a wooden house in the countryside becomes more or less flammable because they build concrete condos in the city. Personally I suspect it would be the opposite, the people who know they probably ought not be driving but need a practical way to get from A to B go self-driving and the people who drive are those who want to, when they want to. And you're driving in a world where most cars actually follow the rules and behave nicely, I believe accident rates will go down on both sides. Whether competition works and the rates come down is another matter.

Comment Re:Oh good, a reason (Score 1) 327

What are Trump and Cruz's views on NSA mass surveillance? I doubt that either oppose it but I'm happy to be proven wrong. Rubio's comments don't seem, on the surface, to be out of whack with 99% of Republicans. I'd be surprised if other current candidates considered by most to not be insane strongly disagree with him on this. (Yeah, Rand Paul might, but he's already dropped out, and in any case...)

What makes Rubio more attractive than those two are that he's not on the theocratic wing, unlike Cruz, and... well, he's not Trump.

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