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Comment: Re:Citation needed (Score 1) 745

by Joff_NZ (#29180935) Attached to: Why the Google Android Phone Isn't Taking Off

I have an HTC Hero (I'm in Australia), and it's excellent. HTC have done a fantastic job of polishing up the UI (custom homescreen and widgets). The onscreen keyboard works really well, and it all seems like a well integrated platform.

Check out the videos on the HTC site, and see if you don't immediately get a case of overwhelming gadget lust ;)

Also, look up Locale for it. It can change settings on your phone depending on *where you are*. IMO, it's Android's killer app.

Censorship

Yes Virginia, ISPs Have Silently Blocked Web Sites 204

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the something-to-think-about dept.
Slashdot contributor Bennett Haselton writes "A recurring theme in editorials about Net Neutrality -- broadly defined as the principle that ISPs may not block or degrade access to sites based on their content or ownership (with exceptions for clearly delineated services like parental controls) -- is that it is a "solution in search of a problem", that ISPs in the free world have never actually blocked legal content on purpose. True, the movement is mostly motivated by statements by some ISPs about what they might do in the future, such as slow down customers' access to sites if the sites haven't paid a fast-lane "toll". But there was also an oft-forgotten episode in 2000 when it was revealed that two backbone providers, AboveNet and TeleGlobe, had been blocking users' access to certain Web sites for over a year -- not due to a configuration error, but by the choice of management within those companies. Maybe I'm biased, since one of the Web sites being blocked was mine. But I think this incident is more relevant than ever now -- not just because it shows that prolonged violations of Net Neutrality can happen, but because some of the people who organized or supported AboveNet's Web filtering, are people in fairly influential positions today, including the head of the Internet Systems Consortium, the head of the IRTF's Anti-Spam Research Group, and the operator of Spamhaus. Which begs the question: If they really believe that backbone companies have the right to silently block Web sites, are some of them headed for a rift with Net Neutrality supporters?" Read on for the rest of his story.

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