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Comment: Pricing of other bikes is off (Score 2) 85

by Joe Tennies (#47249433) Attached to: Shawn Raymond's Tandem Bike is Shorter Than Yours (Video)

Yes, you can get a cheap as crap bike at Walmart for that price, but that's the bottom of the barrel bike from them. A sporting goods store is barely any better than a department store. I don't know what you consider a specialty bike store, but I'd expect that they carry Trek, Giant, and Raleigh. $850 is a mid level fitness Trek (FX 7.4 to be exact). Trek's only tandem is 1$200. Raleigh's is $930. Giant doesn't even have one. Heck, look here: http://www.mtbtandems.com/

Comment: I agree Python (Score 5, Informative) 466

by Joe Tennies (#47240873) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Best Rapid Development Language To Learn Today?

My vote is for Python. My reasons are that it'[s very good for the rapid part. There's also tons of libraries to do darn near everything under the sun (see pypi.python.org). Finally, one thing in their mantra is that readability counts. This means that you can pick up your project several months later and know what it does... maybe even someone else's! Try doing this with Perl or Ruby, and it's much harder.

Python works quite well on the UNIX like systems, decently on Windows, has good command line helper libraries (argparse or optparse), and has several really good web frameworks. Heck, you can use IronPython or Jython and mix into your .NET or Java code!

The biggest weak point is probably full GUIs. It's not that there's not any good ones, there's just not a good default one. TkInter is built-in, but it's based on Tcl/Tk, the interface isn't very Pythonic, and the end result isn't great. WxPython is good for a basic GUIs, but adding custom widgets is hard. PyQt and PySidehas a more complete collection of widgets, but it again is tough to add new widgets. PyGTK has the large collection of widgets, and widgets can be written in Python and become first class widgets even in other languages. The new kid on the block is Kivy, which is kind of like QML for Python. Kivy defines very low level functionality that builds up widgets, but it makes it easy to combine them together to make a complete widget. This sounds like a lot of work, but it turns out to not be as bad as you'd expect.

Also, PyDev, PyCharm, and WingIDE are all pretty amazing IDEs for Python.

Finally, there's a good amount of jobs asking for Python, especially in big cities.

Comment: Re:Python (Score 1) 530

by Joe Tennies (#39917327) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Language Should a Former Coder Dig Into?

They have Python support too. It's called PyCharm, and it's a great IDE.

I have the following IDEs: WingIDE (pretty good... I'd love to support those guys more, but the big guns are starting to come into the market); PyDev (Eclipse-based... best free Python one available), which has gotten a lot better since I first used it and is good; and PyCharm, which is great for web development (especially Django).

Mind you, I tend to just use a text editor and command line to do most of it.

Comment: Re:Was this article all a mistake? (Score 1) 688

by Joe Tennies (#36981954) Attached to: Was<nobr> <wbr></nobr>.NET All a Mistake?

Have you looked at the JetBrains IDEs? PyCharm is amazing. IntelliJ IDEA has been the IDE I keep hearing people actually like for Java. I haven't tried the others, but if they are half as good as PyCharm, they're quite good.

Eclipse isn't actually too bad, except that it was over engineered into little components (the Java way). That just tends to leave it pretty slow.

Note: I do not work for JetBrains, just use PyCharm and have really liked it.

Oracle

European Commission Approves Oracle-Sun Merger 144

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the chomp-chomp-chomp dept.
rubycodez writes "The anti-trust body of the EU, the European Commission, has approved Oracle's acquisition of Sun Microsystems, believing competition would be preserved. It saw PostgreSQL as a viable independent alternative to MySQL and that market access to Java would not be restricted. Uncertainty about Sun's future has cost over a billion dollars in lost sales in the past year."

Comment: Re:Coming to Cydia (Score 1) 541

by Joe Tennies (#28862035) Attached to: Apple Kills Google Voice Apps On the iPhone

There is actually 1 thing missing in your spec list.

Touch screen: Resistive vs Capacitive with multitouch support. iPhone wins big.

I don't actually know it's resistive, but most other HTC stuff is. I use a XV6900 (HTC Vogue) running Android and love it, only thing I really would love would be a capacitive screen. Wouldn't consider an iPhone, but it is a huge selling point.

Networking

+ - Pimping out a new house

Submitted by
Jason Michael Perry
Jason Michael Perry writes "I just got preapproved to buy some gutted property in New Orleans. A lot of the houses I'm looking at are blank canvases that need new wiring, new walls, the whole nine-yards. i've always dreamed of a high tech house that says my name when I walk in and now is my chance to get a close as i can with current technology. That said, I'm looking for ideas to pimp out a newly renovated house with all the best technology. If you had a blank canvas to start with what would you do? Run CAT-5 or Fiber Optics? Build a closet for servers and A/V equipment? Install a 7.1 speaker system into the living room inside the walls and ceillings? Automated lights and intercom (with support for Apple equipment)? How about applicances, the kitchen, and other spots...what cool tech can I use there? My only rules and requirements are support for the 4 Mac's I have in the house...and resonable support for technology on the fringes... -Jason"
Security

+ - The Next Super Worm - Analysis of future AJAX Worm->

Submitted by
An anonymous reader writes "
I will start my discussion by linking to XSSED.com. If you don't know what is XSSED.com I would suggest to go and check what it does right now. Are you done? OK! To summarize XSSED.com has the largest archive of real, fully working, XSS vulnerabilities available today. They even have a list of XSS vulnerabilities that are found in websites ranked 500 and bellow according to ALEXA. We are talking about high profile websites here people.

Why this database is interesting to attackers? Well, obviously, attackers can use it to phish users and steal important/sensitive information. In a very typical scenario, the attacker will grab a few of these XSS vectors, develop exploits for them, and send them to as many victims as possible. Of course the situation is quite grim. However, it is a lot worse then that.

Today it is so easy to create an epidemic infection that is totally based on XSS. If an unaware user visits a page that contain malicious JavaScript which recreates a behaviour similar to the one that a described above, they can be exploited on every single domain they have visited during their entire session.


"The Next Super Worm" is quite interesting article that show the characteristics and behavioural patterns of the next generation AJAX worms. The article is based on a research PDP presented at OWASP and there are some really cool POCs that can be found over GNUCITIZEN."

Link to Original Source
Red Hat Software

+ - Fedora 7 Released!

Submitted by Vertana
Vertana (666) writes "After being developed for 6 months, the Fedora Project today has released the 7th release of Fedora (formerly Fedora Core). New in this release are Fast User Switching, the merging of the repositories (Core and Extras are now all in Core), faster package management, as well as more robust hardware detection. Read more about it here."

Good salesmen and good repairmen will never go hungry. -- R.E. Schenk

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