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User Journal

Journal Journal: slash code

From the "I wish it would just _work_" department.

slash code => , , , ,
Linux Business

The State of Munich's Ongoing Linux Migration 203

christian.einfeldt writes "The Munich decision to move its 14,000 desktops to Free Open Source Software created a big splash back in 2003 as news circulated of the third-largest German city's defection from Microsoft. When it was announced in 2003, the story garnered coverage even in the US, such as an extensive article in USA Today on-line. Currently, about 60% of desktops are using OpenOffice, with the remaining 40% to be completed by the end of 2009. Firefox and Thunderbird are being used in all of the city's desktop machines. Ten percent of desktops are running the LiMux Debian-based distro, and 80% will be running LiMux by 2012 at the latest. Autonomy was generally considered more important than cost savings, although the LiMux initiative is increasing competition in the IT industry in Munich already. The program has succeeded because the city administration has been careful to reach out to all stakeholders, from managers down to simple end users."

Ksplice Offers Rebootless Updates For Ubuntu Systems 211

sdasher writes "Ksplice has started offering Ksplice Uptrack for Ubuntu Jaunty, a free service that delivers rebootless versions of all the latest Ubuntu kernel security updates. It's currently available for both the 32 and 64-bit generic kernel, and they plan to add support for the virtual and server kernels by the end of the month, according to their FAQ. This makes Ubuntu the first OS that doesn't need to be rebooted for security updates. (We covered Ksplice's underlying technology when it was first announced a year ago.)"

Submission + - Swedish Court says : IP numbers privacy protected (

oh2 writes: "The highest applicable Swedish court, Regeringsrätten, has ruled that IP numbers are protected since they can be traced to individuals. This means that only government agencies are allowed to track and store IP adresses, leaving "anti-piracy" advocates with no legal way to find possible copyright infringers. More in swedish here :"

Submission + - Canadian proposed law would allow warrantless sear (

Anonymous Coward writes: "A bill introduced by Canada's Minister of Public Safety will allow police to (warrantlessly) force ISPs to provide access to any requested digital traffic records, reports News 1130. Police lobbied for the bill as means of "combatting gangsters, pedophiles, or terrorists", but apparently they find the legal principles of judicial review and probable cause, as well as a constitutional provision against "unreasonable search or seizure", to be too much of a hassle, and would rather be able to search anyone's web or e-mail traffic at their own discretion and without any oversight. All in the name of public safety, of course."
The Internet

Submission + - Harvard Study Says Weak Copyright Benefits Society 1

An anonymous reader writes: Michael Geist summarizes an important new study on file sharing from economists Felix Oberholzer-Gee and Koleman Strumpf. The Harvard Business School working paper finds that given the increase in artistic production along with the greater public access conclude that "weaker copyright protection, it seems, has benefited society." The authors' point out that file sharing may not result in reduced incentives to create if the willingness to pay for "complements" such as concerts or author speaking tours increases.

Submission + - NSA Email Surveillance Pervasive and Ongoing

dkleinsc writes: The NY Times has a piece about Congressman Rush Holt's (D-NJ) and others' efforts to curb the NSA efforts to read email and Internet traffic. Some idea of the general tone:

Since April, when it was disclosed that the intercepts of some private communications of Americans went beyond legal limits in late 2008 and early 2009, several Congressional committees have been investigating. Those inquiries have led to concerns in Congress about the agency's ability to collect and read domestic e-mail messages of Americans on a widespread basis, officials said. Supporting that conclusion is the account of a former N.S.A. analyst who, in a series of interviews, described being trained in 2005 for a program in which the agency routinely examined large volumes of Americans' e-mail messages without court warrants. Two intelligence officials confirmed that the program was still in operation.

"You can't get very far in this world without your dossier being there first." -- Arthur Miller