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Comment: Re:faster than light never violates Relativity (Score 1) 145

yes, agreed. the idea of keeping anything larger than an atom entangled for anything longer than a second over any distance over an inch seems like a colossal almost impossible task with today's technology

i was only doing a thought experiment

in the realm of way out there then: i wonder if you could entangle a number of "copies" of yourself: dozens, hundreds, millions

you just sort of disperse throughout the universe (not interacting with anything, i know, basically impossible by today's standards)

but in an instant, if you, or someone outside, decides one "copy" of you should be the one that coheres at a given place: boom, you're there

just an interesting thought with interesting ramifications- you (or someone else) doesn't have to decide out of dozens or maybe thousands of destinations... until the very last moment. that's a pretty exotic form of "travel"

Comment: Re:A niche product in a niche market (Score 1) 303

it's called desalination and it's a common mundane technology

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D...

"boiling the oceans" makes me think you have no fucking clue about the kind of scale we're talking about here

if every nation exerted every single drop of it's GDP building desalination plants, we wouldn't make the tiniest of dents in the oceans genius

Comment: Re:Answer (Score 1) 303

by lgw (#49792799) Attached to: How Much C++ Should You Know For an Entry-Level C++ Job?

That's not C++. That's "C with classes". (No true Scotsman uses C++ that way!) There should really be a new C standard that adds classes, C++-- or something. (BTW, a sure sign that people don't understand C++ is when they argue that the STL is slow.)

It's funny to hear game devs argue that C++ is too abstract, and then in the next breath wonder how they're ever going to get their code to use more than one core. I hope you're not that guy!

I'm in a different world. To me, performance means infinite horizontal scalability. Clarity and performance of work distribution across N machines (for arbitrary N) is where the fun is. Counting cycles and optimizing bytes got boring when machines got fast (a Raspberry Pi blows away the mainframes I started on).

Comment: Re:Answer (Score 1) 303

by lgw (#49792719) Attached to: How Much C++ Should You Know For an Entry-Level C++ Job?

Only catch exceptions that you can fix is the rule. If you can't actually do something useful about an exception, why would you catch it? There's nothing worse than Pokemon code!

catch(...) make perfect sense in one place - in main(), followed by logging the exception and terminating the process.

The whole point of this entire mindset is to stop checking for errors individually after each call. This lets you eliminate about 2/3s of your lines of code, all boilerplate, and reveal the actual business logic of each function by sweeping away the clutter. But there's a whole crowd of devs who like the clutter. They're not actually very good at coding, but mindless repetition they can do. This mindset is anathema to those guys. RAII without exceptions leaves half the clutter, and so doesn't achieve the goal.

Comment: Re:Answer (Score 1) 303

by lgw (#49792635) Attached to: How Much C++ Should You Know For an Entry-Level C++ Job?

If you don't really need to make systems calls, that's absolutely the right answer IMO. I only favor C++ if I need to do platform-specific messing around with filesystem behavior, or low-level netcode. As soon as you need to do any sort of bit-twiddling, or you care at all about asymptotically-constant-time performance improvements, Java stops being useful (and I always prefer C# to Java where practical - same functionality with half as many lines of code).

I really don't see the point of using C (or C-style coding in C++) outside of kernel-mode stuff, however.

Comment: Re:Answer (Score 1) 303

by lgw (#49792569) Attached to: How Much C++ Should You Know For an Entry-Level C++ Job?

A new hire from college is not a "beginner", at least not anywhere I've worked recently. If you choose to interview in C++, you had better know the basic STL classes (string, vector, map) as well. Sure, it's rare to see an interview question that would probe RAII/resource management for entry-level, but knowing that stuff coming in would really help. (We don't care what language someone is good in for an entry level job, but they have to demonstrate some depth in one language of their choice.)

Space

Neil DeGrasse Tyson Urges America To Challenge China To a Space Race 59

Posted by timothy
from the autocorrect-says-neil-degrease-tyson dept.
An anonymous reader writes: According to a Tuesday story in the UK edition of the International Business Times, Neil deGrasse Tyson, the celebrity astrophysicist and media personality, advocates a space race between the United States and China. The idea is that such a race would spur innovation and cause industry to grow. The Apollo race to the moon caused a similar explosive period of scientific research and engineering development. You might prefer the Sydney Morning Herald piece on which the IB Times article is based.

Google News Sci Tech: Google unveils Android Pay, its Apple Pay competitor - VentureBeat->

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VentureBeat

Google unveils Android Pay, its Apple Pay competitor
VentureBeat
Today Google unveiled Android Pay at the Google I/O developer conference. The new payment platform is a competitor to Apple Pay, which allows iPhone 6, 6 Plus, and Apple Watch users to make purchases on their device or in brick and mortar stores.
Google announces Android M, available later this yearThe Verge
Confirmed: HBO NOW is coming to Android and ChromecastSlashGear
Android M officially outlined at Google I/O 2015TrustedReviews
USA TODAY-Android Headlines - Android News-Engadget (blog)
all 1,141 news articles

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Google News Sci Tech: Google's Gmail hits 900 million users, opens up Inbox - USA TODAY->

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Mashable

Google's Gmail hits 900 million users, opens up Inbox
USA TODAY
SAN FRANCISCO — Extending the lead of the world's most popular email service, Gmail now reaches 900 million around the globe, more than double the 425 million monthly active users that it had three years ago. Google's senior vice president of products...
Any Gmail or Google Apps user can now use the Inbox appMashable
Google opens Inbox to everyone, adds new features like Trip Bundles, Undo ... VentureBeat
Google's Newfangled Inbox Email App Opens To Everybody, Unveils New ... Fast Company
TechCrunch
all 8 news articles

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Reactor error - core dumped!

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